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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Babcock, Elisabeth D.
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2014

    Moving out of poverty is no longer a short process of following a simple roadmap to a good job. It has become a lengthy, complex navigational challenge requiring individuals to rely on strong executive function (EF) skills (impulse control, working memory, and mental flexibility) in order to effectively manage life’s competing demands and optimize their decisions over many years. Experiences of social bias, persistent poverty, and trauma can directly undermine brain development and the EF skills most needed for success. The specific EF challenges in managing thoughts, behavior, and health caused by such adverse experiences are increasingly well understood, and this understanding may be used to improve policy and program design.

    The areas of the brain affected by adverse experiences of social bias, persistent poverty, and trauma remain plastic well into adulthood and, through proper coaching, may be strengthened and improved. Improvements in executive functioning are likely to positively impact outcomes in all areas of life, including parenting, personal relationships,...

    Moving out of poverty is no longer a short process of following a simple roadmap to a good job. It has become a lengthy, complex navigational challenge requiring individuals to rely on strong executive function (EF) skills (impulse control, working memory, and mental flexibility) in order to effectively manage life’s competing demands and optimize their decisions over many years. Experiences of social bias, persistent poverty, and trauma can directly undermine brain development and the EF skills most needed for success. The specific EF challenges in managing thoughts, behavior, and health caused by such adverse experiences are increasingly well understood, and this understanding may be used to improve policy and program design.

    The areas of the brain affected by adverse experiences of social bias, persistent poverty, and trauma remain plastic well into adulthood and, through proper coaching, may be strengthened and improved. Improvements in executive functioning are likely to positively impact outcomes in all areas of life, including parenting, personal relationships, money management, educational attainment, and career success. Policy makers and program leaders should attempt to use new learning from brain science to strengthen policy and program design targeting those impacted by social bias, persistent poverty, and trauma and to create frameworks and coaching approaches to augment and improve executive functioning. Based on early learning from brain science and its application to programs at Crittenton Women’s Union (CWU), this white paper offers recommendations on ways this science may be used to improve policy and program design and participant outcomes. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Carey, Camille; Solomon, Robert A.
    Year: 2014

    Domestic violence victims often face the impossible choice between physical safety and financial security. State intervention can offer some protection to victims, but enlisting the criminal justice system through reporting domestic violence or restraining order violations can have drastic financial consequences. Involving the state is likely to lead to sanctions for the abuser which would ultimately deprive the victim of child support, alimony, and other financial support, which may be the totality of the victim’s financial resources. To avoid this result, many victims refuse to enforce court orders intended to maximize their safety. This article examines the context in which victims must “choose” between physical safety and financial security and the lawyer’s difficult position when a client prioritizes financial stability. Using a compelling case study that exemplifies this impossible choice, the article examines the role of economic dependence in victim decision-making; reasons why victims avoid protections offered by the criminal justice system; issues of capacity,...

    Domestic violence victims often face the impossible choice between physical safety and financial security. State intervention can offer some protection to victims, but enlisting the criminal justice system through reporting domestic violence or restraining order violations can have drastic financial consequences. Involving the state is likely to lead to sanctions for the abuser which would ultimately deprive the victim of child support, alimony, and other financial support, which may be the totality of the victim’s financial resources. To avoid this result, many victims refuse to enforce court orders intended to maximize their safety. This article examines the context in which victims must “choose” between physical safety and financial security and the lawyer’s difficult position when a client prioritizes financial stability. Using a compelling case study that exemplifies this impossible choice, the article examines the role of economic dependence in victim decision-making; reasons why victims avoid protections offered by the criminal justice system; issues of capacity, competence, and the Rules of Professional Responsibility in representing victims; the different models of client-centered lawyering and cause lawyering; and recent social science work on the ability to predict future domestic violence based on current behavior. The authors view this through the lens of law school clinical programs, and the experiences of students who work on the cases and what limitations, if any, there are to clinical representation when the client trades safety for economic stability. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schneider, Jo Anne
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2006

    This paper provides a succinct overview of the concept of social capital and describes ways in which social capital can play a role in economic and community development. Examples illustrating these concepts are drawn from more than 20 years of research in urban communities, as well as from case studies produced by others involved with community development. The paper addresses the following questions:
    1) What is social capital, and how do the various kinds of social capital play out in the ways that community needs are met?
    2) What kinds of social capital building strategies are useful in economic and community development?

    (Author abstract)

    This paper provides a succinct overview of the concept of social capital and describes ways in which social capital can play a role in economic and community development. Examples illustrating these concepts are drawn from more than 20 years of research in urban communities, as well as from case studies produced by others involved with community development. The paper addresses the following questions:
    1) What is social capital, and how do the various kinds of social capital play out in the ways that community needs are met?
    2) What kinds of social capital building strategies are useful in economic and community development?

    (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chaudry, Ajay; Henly, Julia; Meyers, Marcia
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2010

    This working paper is one in a series of projects initiated by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to improve knowledge for child care researchers and policy makers about parental child care decision making. In this paper, we identify three distinct conceptual frameworks for understanding child care decisions – a rational consumer choice framework, a heuristics and biases framework, and a social network framework – and review the major assumptions, contributions, and possible limitations of each of these frameworks. We then discuss an integrated conceptual model, the accommodation model that draws from each of these frameworks. The first three frameworks come primarily from the fields of economics, psychology, and sociology, respectively. It is our sense that most research about child care decision making has been informed by the theories, assumptions, and empirical methods of one or more of these frameworks, either explicitly or implicitly, and we provide some examples and elaborate the basic tenets of each framework. The integrative accommodation model was first...

    This working paper is one in a series of projects initiated by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to improve knowledge for child care researchers and policy makers about parental child care decision making. In this paper, we identify three distinct conceptual frameworks for understanding child care decisions – a rational consumer choice framework, a heuristics and biases framework, and a social network framework – and review the major assumptions, contributions, and possible limitations of each of these frameworks. We then discuss an integrated conceptual model, the accommodation model that draws from each of these frameworks. The first three frameworks come primarily from the fields of economics, psychology, and sociology, respectively. It is our sense that most research about child care decision making has been informed by the theories, assumptions, and empirical methods of one or more of these frameworks, either explicitly or implicitly, and we provide some examples and elaborate the basic tenets of each framework. The integrative accommodation model was first presented by Marcia Meyers and Lucy Jordan (2006). We develop and elaborate this model more fully here with explicit attention to its relation to the rational consumer choice framework, the heuristics and biases framework, and the social network frameworks. These frameworks are presented as complementary, rather than mutually exclusive. For a process as complex as parental child care decisions, each can provide a different and useful lens through which to understand unique aspects of the factors, processes and outcomes of parental child care decisions. When considered together, we believe they may inform one another and the development of more integrative models, such as the accommodation model presented here. It is our hope that researchers working primarily within one of the conceptual frameworks discussed here will benefit from learning about other frameworks. In some cases, this may simply suggest additional or new variables to consider when specifying a particular model, while still working from the same conceptual framework. In other cases, it may result in integrative approaches that address multiple dimensions of the decision making process – dimensions that may not be as obvious when working within a single framework. In the concluding section we discuss some of the issues and the implications for future research. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Deke, John
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2018

    Federally funded systematic reviews of research evidence play a central role in efforts to base policy decisions on evidence. These evidence reviews seek to assist decision makers by rating the quality of and summarizing the findings from research evidence. Historically, evidence reviews have reserved the highest ratings of quality for studies that employ experimental designs, namely randomized control trials (RCTs). The RCT is considered the “gold standard” of research evidence because randomization ensures that the only thing that could cause a difference in outcomes between the treatment and control groups is the intervention program.1 However, not all intervention programs can be evaluated using an RCT. To develop an evidence base for those programs, non-experimental study designs may need to be used. In recent years, standards for some federally funded evidence reviews (i.e., the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Review [HomVEE] and the What Works Clearinghouse [WWC]) have been expanded to include two non-experimental designs—the regression discontinuity design (RDD)...

    Federally funded systematic reviews of research evidence play a central role in efforts to base policy decisions on evidence. These evidence reviews seek to assist decision makers by rating the quality of and summarizing the findings from research evidence. Historically, evidence reviews have reserved the highest ratings of quality for studies that employ experimental designs, namely randomized control trials (RCTs). The RCT is considered the “gold standard” of research evidence because randomization ensures that the only thing that could cause a difference in outcomes between the treatment and control groups is the intervention program.1 However, not all intervention programs can be evaluated using an RCT. To develop an evidence base for those programs, non-experimental study designs may need to be used. In recent years, standards for some federally funded evidence reviews (i.e., the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Review [HomVEE] and the What Works Clearinghouse [WWC]) have been expanded to include two non-experimental designs—the regression discontinuity design (RDD) and single case design (SCD). Through the lens of these two reviews, this brief identifies key considerations for systematically and reliably assessing the causal validity of non-experimental studies. Specifically, this brief:

    1. Defines causal validity,

    2. Provides examples of threats to causal validity and methods that can be used to address those threats,

    3. Discusses causal validity ratings in HomVEE and WWC, and

    4. Summarizes key considerations for developing standards to assess the causal validity of nonexperimental designs.

    (Author overview)

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