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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle; McCay, Jonathan; Kauff, Jacqueline F.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    New evidence from neuroscience, psychology, and other behavioral sciences suggests that TANF programs may be able to improve participants’ outcomes by applying the science of self-regulation. Self-regulation refers to a foundational set of skills and personality factors that enable people to control their thoughts, emotions, and behavior. It is what helps people set goals, make plans, solve problems, reason, organize, prioritize, initiate tasks, manage time, and persist in and monitor their actions. Mathematica engaged four TANF programs implementing new interventions informed by evidence on self-regulation and designed to help participants reach their personal and job-related goals in a process to improve the quality of the interventions and their implementation. The process, called Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2), brings social science theory, research evidence, and practice wisdom together, with the goal of creating innovations that are practical, effective, scalable, and sustainable. (Author introduction)

     

    New evidence from neuroscience, psychology, and other behavioral sciences suggests that TANF programs may be able to improve participants’ outcomes by applying the science of self-regulation. Self-regulation refers to a foundational set of skills and personality factors that enable people to control their thoughts, emotions, and behavior. It is what helps people set goals, make plans, solve problems, reason, organize, prioritize, initiate tasks, manage time, and persist in and monitor their actions. Mathematica engaged four TANF programs implementing new interventions informed by evidence on self-regulation and designed to help participants reach their personal and job-related goals in a process to improve the quality of the interventions and their implementation. The process, called Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2), brings social science theory, research evidence, and practice wisdom together, with the goal of creating innovations that are practical, effective, scalable, and sustainable. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Child & Family Policy Institute of California
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    The information in this brief is based on a cross-sectional study of safety net/timed-out and sanctioned parents associated with child-only cases in five northern California counties representing a range of economic, demographic and urban/suburban/rural contexts. This study is the second in a series presenting research on the composition, characteristics and needs of child-only cases. (author introduction)

    The information in this brief is based on a cross-sectional study of safety net/timed-out and sanctioned parents associated with child-only cases in five northern California counties representing a range of economic, demographic and urban/suburban/rural contexts. This study is the second in a series presenting research on the composition, characteristics and needs of child-only cases. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Martinez, Dan; McConnell, Sheena; Simmons, Noelle; Timmerman, Larrry
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS).This session explored goal-oriented, employment-focused coaching programs that serve low-income individuals. Facilitated  by Sheena McConnell (Mathematica Policy Research), this session opened with an explanation of the conceptual and evidence-based underpinnings of coaching, and then featured presentations from three practitioners overseeing coaching programs in San Francisco, CA; Southeast Michigan; and Ramsey County, MN. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS).This session explored goal-oriented, employment-focused coaching programs that serve low-income individuals. Facilitated  by Sheena McConnell (Mathematica Policy Research), this session opened with an explanation of the conceptual and evidence-based underpinnings of coaching, and then featured presentations from three practitioners overseeing coaching programs in San Francisco, CA; Southeast Michigan; and Ramsey County, MN. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Mauldon, Jane; Speiglman, Richard; Sogar, Christina
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2010

    Raising children is a challenge for virtually all parents. It is made harder when a parent is disabled by poor physical health, mental illness, or learning barriers. In 2008-2009, about 31,000 California parents sufficiently disabled and poor to qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) were raising between them some 55,000 children with assistance from the child-only component of CalWORKs, California’s TANF program.

    Drawing on data from families in San Francisco, this brief aims to help policy makers assess how adequately the combination of SSI and CalWORKs meets the needs of these particularly vulnerable families. Many of these parents received CalWORKs themselves before their disability was fully recognized and they moved to SSI. Because SSI provides a much larger parent grant than does CalWORKs, and because SSI is not time-limited, it seems that with this shift in aid families should be better off.

    Under SSI, however, parents and their children are not automatically linked to social work or other services, even though the parents’ limitations are...

    Raising children is a challenge for virtually all parents. It is made harder when a parent is disabled by poor physical health, mental illness, or learning barriers. In 2008-2009, about 31,000 California parents sufficiently disabled and poor to qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) were raising between them some 55,000 children with assistance from the child-only component of CalWORKs, California’s TANF program.

    Drawing on data from families in San Francisco, this brief aims to help policy makers assess how adequately the combination of SSI and CalWORKs meets the needs of these particularly vulnerable families. Many of these parents received CalWORKs themselves before their disability was fully recognized and they moved to SSI. Because SSI provides a much larger parent grant than does CalWORKs, and because SSI is not time-limited, it seems that with this shift in aid families should be better off.

    Under SSI, however, parents and their children are not automatically linked to social work or other services, even though the parents’ limitations are debilitating and the children are likely to be very poor for their entire childhood. The families rarely qualify for auxiliary supports such as transportation, subsidized child care, or behavioral health resources beyond Medi-Cal funded mental health or alcohol and drug services. 

    Additional non-financial strategies may be available to support healthy child development and adult wellbeing among SSI-parent families whose children are on CalWORKs. Since counties differ in their welfare funding, in aspects of CalWORKs program design, and in the extent and variety of resources available, the implications and conclusions to be drawn from this brief will differ from county to county. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Speiglman, Richard; Li, Yongmei
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Since California adopted the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program as the California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program in 1997, the composition of the California welfare population has changed radically. While at its onset the vast majority of CalWORKs cases included an aided adult, over half of CalWORKs cases now receive aid just for the children. The adults either never were eligible or have been excluded from cash aid and receipt of most services. The “child-only” cases include those with: 1) parents timed-out, having reached the five-year, lifetime limit on receipt of aid (safety net cases), 2) parents sanctioned for non-compliance with CalWORKs program requirements (sanction cases), 3) parents of citizen children who are themselves considered not-qualified immigrants (immigrant parent cases), 4) parents receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for themselves (SSI parent cases), and 5) nonparental caregivers.

    Parents associated with sanctioned and safety net cases were at one time “aided adults” on a...

    Since California adopted the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program as the California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program in 1997, the composition of the California welfare population has changed radically. While at its onset the vast majority of CalWORKs cases included an aided adult, over half of CalWORKs cases now receive aid just for the children. The adults either never were eligible or have been excluded from cash aid and receipt of most services. The “child-only” cases include those with: 1) parents timed-out, having reached the five-year, lifetime limit on receipt of aid (safety net cases), 2) parents sanctioned for non-compliance with CalWORKs program requirements (sanction cases), 3) parents of citizen children who are themselves considered not-qualified immigrants (immigrant parent cases), 4) parents receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for themselves (SSI parent cases), and 5) nonparental caregivers.

    Parents associated with sanctioned and safety net cases were at one time “aided adults” on a CalWORKs case. At some point, however, this status changed, and the parents lost aid. For safety net cases, this is because they “used up” their 60 months of lifetime CalWORKs aid. Sanctioned parents who may have received aid for any length of time short of 60 months became unaided when the county sanctioned them for non-compliance with welfare-to-work regulations. Parents and caregivers in the other three case types, however, because of their ineligibility, may themselves never have been aided.

    Lacking information about most child-only cases, and being concerned about the status of both parents/caregivers and children associated with these cases, the Child-only Study was initiated to promote sound CalWORKs policy and program through researching child-only and aided adult CalWORKs cases and informing policy-makers and CalWORKs program administrators about these low-income California families.

    This report is the second in a series presenting research on the composition, characteristics, and needs of child-only cases in California counties. Child-only Study Report #1 analyzed county administrative data to understand (1) the prevalence of subgroups of child-only cases by county, (2) the characteristics of family members comprising child-only cases by subgroup and by county, and (3) the patterns of history of receipt of aid by subgroup and by county. This second report is based on interviews with timed-out and sanctioned parents concerning personal, community, and family characteristics that may serve as barriers to work. (author abstract)

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