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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Freedman, Stephen; Mitchell, Marisa; Navarro, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This report presents first-year participation and impact findings from the evaluation of the Los Angeles Jobs-First GAIN (Greater Avenues for Independence) program, the largest county welfare-to-work program in the nation. Consistent with the philosophy and goals of the 1996 federal welfare reform legislation that created TANF, Los Angeles Jobs-First GAIN emphasizes job search assistance and imparts a strong pro-work message in attempting to move thousands of AFDC/TANF recipients quickly into jobs and, as soon as feasible, off the welfare rolls. This message and emphasis place Jobs-First GAIN in the category of Work First programs, the approach followed by most current state and local welfare-to-work programs. Most of the features of Jobs-First GAIN continue under CalWORKs, California’s program under the TANF provisions. Los Angeles inaugurated its CalWORKs program in April 1998, after the follow-up period for this report. The findings on Jobs-First GAIN have broad significance for welfare reform. Los Angeles County, with a total population of 9.6 million people, has the largest...

    This report presents first-year participation and impact findings from the evaluation of the Los Angeles Jobs-First GAIN (Greater Avenues for Independence) program, the largest county welfare-to-work program in the nation. Consistent with the philosophy and goals of the 1996 federal welfare reform legislation that created TANF, Los Angeles Jobs-First GAIN emphasizes job search assistance and imparts a strong pro-work message in attempting to move thousands of AFDC/TANF recipients quickly into jobs and, as soon as feasible, off the welfare rolls. This message and emphasis place Jobs-First GAIN in the category of Work First programs, the approach followed by most current state and local welfare-to-work programs. Most of the features of Jobs-First GAIN continue under CalWORKs, California’s program under the TANF provisions. Los Angeles inaugurated its CalWORKs program in April 1998, after the follow-up period for this report. The findings on Jobs-First GAIN have broad significance for welfare reform. Los Angeles County, with a total population of 9.6 million people, has the largest welfare population of any county in the United States (about 700,000 people, in about a quarter of a million cases) — roughly one-twelfth of the nation’s welfare caseload and larger than that of any state except New York and California. Hispanics and African-Americans make up about 80 percent of the county’s welfare population. If Los Angeles County’s Work First program succeeds in moving significant numbers of people from welfare to work, the program can serve as a model for many other large urban areas.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fink, Barbara; Widom, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    In order to fully understand how welfare reform influences the well-being of low-income families and communities, we must learn how human service organizations are affected by new welfare policies. This report examines agency staff members’ knowledge about welfare reform, their overall views of welfare reform, their experience of its impact on their agencies, and their expectations of how it will affect them. The findings offer preliminary insights into how new government policies shape other components of the network of service provision that is essential to the well-being of low-income families. (Author abstract) 

    In order to fully understand how welfare reform influences the well-being of low-income families and communities, we must learn how human service organizations are affected by new welfare policies. This report examines agency staff members’ knowledge about welfare reform, their overall views of welfare reform, their experience of its impact on their agencies, and their expectations of how it will affect them. The findings offer preliminary insights into how new government policies shape other components of the network of service provision that is essential to the well-being of low-income families. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Stevens, Max; Toros, Halil; Mehrtash, Farhad; Joshi, Vandana; Dale, La Vern
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    This report was written to inform policymakers and stakeholders about CalWORKs children in the County of Los Angeles. The descriptive research conducted for this study is a product of DPSS’ concern for the well-being of children in CalWORKs families. The report attempts to lay the groundwork for further research that will inform policymaking designed to improve the way CalWORKs serves its child population. 

    Our preliminary analysis of how the CalWORKs aided population has changed in the wake of welfare reform is particularly noteworthy. When the Welfare-to-Work Act was implemented in the State of California in 1998, efforts were made to ensure that the new law would not be injurious to children. For this reason, programmatic features of welfare reform in California, such as sanctions for noncompliance and five-year time limits, do not affect the child portion of CalWORKs cash grants. Children continue to receive cash aid even if their parents reach time limits or are sanctioned. The consequence of this has been quite significant. As sanctions have increased and parents...

    This report was written to inform policymakers and stakeholders about CalWORKs children in the County of Los Angeles. The descriptive research conducted for this study is a product of DPSS’ concern for the well-being of children in CalWORKs families. The report attempts to lay the groundwork for further research that will inform policymaking designed to improve the way CalWORKs serves its child population. 

    Our preliminary analysis of how the CalWORKs aided population has changed in the wake of welfare reform is particularly noteworthy. When the Welfare-to-Work Act was implemented in the State of California in 1998, efforts were made to ensure that the new law would not be injurious to children. For this reason, programmatic features of welfare reform in California, such as sanctions for noncompliance and five-year time limits, do not affect the child portion of CalWORKs cash grants. Children continue to receive cash aid even if their parents reach time limits or are sanctioned. The consequence of this has been quite significant. As sanctions have increased and parents have reached time limits over the last few years, CalWORKs has evolved increasingly into an aid program for children. As of March 2005, less than two-fifths of CalWORKs cases in the County of Los Angeles were cases in which adults received cash aid. The majority of cases are ones in which parents are unaided while their children receive assistance.

    Insofar as CalWORKs is increasingly an aid program for children, a report such as this one becomes all the more important. Identifying areas within CalWORKs where policy enhancements are necessary requires an enriched understanding of the program’s child population. This report makes a contribution towards this end. In the pages that follow, the demographic and background characteristics of CalWORKs children in the County of Los Angeles are identified. Moreover, descriptive analysis of statistical data is provided and reveals the child population in CalWORKs as one with diverse program characteristics. In addition, issues affecting the long-term well-being of CalWORKs children - such as school drop-out rates, teen pregnancy, child abuse, and health insurance coverage - are examined. This valuable information will be an important asset in the hands of policymakers as they consider how to actively respond to the changing nature of the aided population. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Polit, Denise F.; London, Andrew S.; Martinez, John M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    To what extent might the health of welfare recipients and their children play a role in the new welfare environment? In 1996, Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), creating a five-year lifetime limit on the receipt of federal cash welfare benefits for most families. PRWORA dropped the language from prior legislation that excused welfare recipients from mandatory participation in welfare-to-work activities for health reasons. The new policy considers all recipients subject to participation requirements and time limits, except for an undefined 20 percent of each state's caseload who may be excused for "good cause." There is little information about whether the 20 percent figure is sufficient to encompass all recipients with health problems - or whether women leaving welfare will be able to secure the health care they need for themselves and their children.

    This report describes the health and health care needs of welfare recipients (and former recipients) living in large urban areas, where a substantial percentage of...

    To what extent might the health of welfare recipients and their children play a role in the new welfare environment? In 1996, Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), creating a five-year lifetime limit on the receipt of federal cash welfare benefits for most families. PRWORA dropped the language from prior legislation that excused welfare recipients from mandatory participation in welfare-to-work activities for health reasons. The new policy considers all recipients subject to participation requirements and time limits, except for an undefined 20 percent of each state's caseload who may be excused for "good cause." There is little information about whether the 20 percent figure is sufficient to encompass all recipients with health problems - or whether women leaving welfare will be able to secure the health care they need for themselves and their children.

    This report describes the health and health care needs of welfare recipients (and former recipients) living in large urban areas, where a substantial percentage of the national welfare caseload lives. The report is based on 1998-1999 survey and ethnographic data from the Project on Devolution and Urban Change, a multi-component study designed to examine the implementation and effects of PRWORA in four urban counties: Cuyahoga (Cleveland), Los Angeles, Miami-Dade, and Philadelphia. Survey respondents were selected randomly from among the May 1995 public assistance recipients residing in high-poverty neighborhoods in each county. The report compares the health of four groups of women based on their statuses at the time of the survey: women who had left welfare and were working, women who combined welfare and work, women who received welfare and did not work, and women who neither worked nor received welfare. Ethnographic interview data, collected from welfare recipients living in selected neighborhoods in each site, complement and augment the survey findings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinez, John; Farrell, Mary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    This presentation describes findings from Phase 1 of the TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project (TSDTP) in the three project sites: Muskegon County, MI; Los Angeles County, CA; and Ramsey County, MN.  

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes findings from Phase 1 of the TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project (TSDTP) in the three project sites: Muskegon County, MI; Los Angeles County, CA; and Ramsey County, MN.  

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

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