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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Strawn, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Students forced to complete a long sequence of remedial or English language classes before they can begin their postsecondary program rarely earn college certificates or degrees. This brief highlights six promising programs that show how career pathway bridges help lower-skilled students move farther and faster along college and career paths through dual enrollment in linked basic skills and occupational certificate courses. Because creating such bridges requires collaboration across college silos, they can also transform the way colleges operate. (author abstract)

    Students forced to complete a long sequence of remedial or English language classes before they can begin their postsecondary program rarely earn college certificates or degrees. This brief highlights six promising programs that show how career pathway bridges help lower-skilled students move farther and faster along college and career paths through dual enrollment in linked basic skills and occupational certificate courses. Because creating such bridges requires collaboration across college silos, they can also transform the way colleges operate. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lombardi, Allison; Seburn, Mary; Conley, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    In this cross-validation study, the authors examined the psychometric properties of a measure of academic behaviors associated with college and career readiness intended for high school students. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted with a randomly selected portion of the sample (n = 413) and resulted in four reliable factors: Goal-driven Behaviors, Persistence, Study Skills, and Self-Monitoring. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted with the remaining sample (n = 610). Goodness-of-fit indices indicated acceptable model fit. Follow-up analyses revealed significant differences in factor scores among 9th grade students according to gender and race but no significant differences between students in grades 10 through 12, showing the measure functions similarly across students for the most part and particularly for students approaching graduation. Implications for use as a value-added assessment in secondary environments are discussed. (Author abstract)

    In this cross-validation study, the authors examined the psychometric properties of a measure of academic behaviors associated with college and career readiness intended for high school students. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted with a randomly selected portion of the sample (n = 413) and resulted in four reliable factors: Goal-driven Behaviors, Persistence, Study Skills, and Self-Monitoring. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted with the remaining sample (n = 610). Goodness-of-fit indices indicated acceptable model fit. Follow-up analyses revealed significant differences in factor scores among 9th grade students according to gender and race but no significant differences between students in grades 10 through 12, showing the measure functions similarly across students for the most part and particularly for students approaching graduation. Implications for use as a value-added assessment in secondary environments are discussed. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Azurdia, Gilda; Barnes, Zakia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    This paper and accompanying tables present the implementation results and two-year impacts on employment, earnings, and public assistance receipt for the Career Builders program in Portland, Oregon. Using a team-based case management approach, Career Builders intended to remove employment barriers and assist with job placement and employment retention and advancement for a particular group: applicants and recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who had a break in employment or received TANF in the two years prior to study entry. The program was run from two district offices of the Oregon Department of Human Services (“North” and “East” offices) in collaboration with two community colleges (Mount Hood Community College [MHCC] and Portland Community College [PCC]). (author abstract)

    This paper and accompanying tables present the implementation results and two-year impacts on employment, earnings, and public assistance receipt for the Career Builders program in Portland, Oregon. Using a team-based case management approach, Career Builders intended to remove employment barriers and assist with job placement and employment retention and advancement for a particular group: applicants and recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who had a break in employment or received TANF in the two years prior to study entry. The program was run from two district offices of the Oregon Department of Human Services (“North” and “East” offices) in collaboration with two community colleges (Mount Hood Community College [MHCC] and Portland Community College [PCC]). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Copson, Elizabeth; Schneider, Glen; Elkin, Sam; Sarfo, Bright; Kappil, Tresa; Ma, Claire; Morrison, Carly; Nakas, Audra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    A key challenge facing policymakers and program administrators is how to develop effective strategies to help Americans facing economic challenges, particularly the long-term unemployed, to succeed in the labor market. During the deep recession of 2008-2009, an unprecedented number of workers lost their jobs and many remained under- or unemployed, even as the economy recovered. Identifying what strategies that can help them regain their economic footing has been a priority, with a particular interest in employment in higher-paying middle- and high-skill jobs that are in demand by American businesses.

    As part of this effort, in 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) funded the Ready to Work (RTW) Partnership grant program that is the focus of this report. RTW grants went to partnerships of workforce agencies, training providers, employers, and other organizations, to improve the employment prospects of the long-term unemployed by providing a range of customized services including training and job search assistance. The intent of the RTW grant program is to establish...

    A key challenge facing policymakers and program administrators is how to develop effective strategies to help Americans facing economic challenges, particularly the long-term unemployed, to succeed in the labor market. During the deep recession of 2008-2009, an unprecedented number of workers lost their jobs and many remained under- or unemployed, even as the economy recovered. Identifying what strategies that can help them regain their economic footing has been a priority, with a particular interest in employment in higher-paying middle- and high-skill jobs that are in demand by American businesses.

    As part of this effort, in 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) funded the Ready to Work (RTW) Partnership grant program that is the focus of this report. RTW grants went to partnerships of workforce agencies, training providers, employers, and other organizations, to improve the employment prospects of the long-term unemployed by providing a range of customized services including training and job search assistance. The intent of the RTW grant program is to establish programs that might prove effective in preparing U.S. workers for employment, particularly in occupations and industries being filled by foreign workers through the H-1B visa program. In 2014, DOL awarded four-year grants totaling $170 million to 23 grantees, with individual awards ranging from $3 to $10 million.

    DOL's Employment and Training Administration, in collaboration with the Chief Evaluation Office, sponsored a rigorous evaluation of the RTW grant program. The evaluation includes an implementation and impact study and is being conducted by Abt Associates and its partner MEF Associates. In consultation with DOL, the evaluation team purposively selected four grantees for study based on their program design and scale.

    This report documents early findings from the evaluation's implementation study of the four grantees. For each grantee, the report describes the design and operation of its grant-funded program components, including staff guidance, occupational training, employment readiness and job search assistance, work-based training, and other services individualized to each participant's needs and skill gaps. The report also presents key findings related to the implementation and operation of the programs. Future reports will examine the effectiveness of the four grantee programs individually in improving participants' education and employment outcomes. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Scrivener, Susan; Hamilton, Gayle; Farrell, Mary; Freedman, Stephen; Friedlander, Daniel; Mitchell, Marisa; Nudelman, Jodi; Schwartz, Christine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    As states and localities transform their welfare­-to-­work programs in response to the federal legislation, the need to learn about programs that have moved substantial numbers of people into work and off welfare increases.  The two ­year findings presented in this report show the Portland, Oregon, welfare-­to­-work program run between early 1993 and mid 1996 to be among the most successful large ­scale mandatory welfare-­to-­work programs studied, producing large increases in employment and earnings and equally large reductions in welfare receipt for a broad cross section of the welfare caseload.  The positive effects remained very strong at the end of the two ­year period studied, and preliminary data suggest they will continue into the third year.

    This report is the latest from an evaluation of mandatory welfare-­to-­work programs in seven sites called the National Evaluation of welfare-­to-­work Strategies (NEWWS Evaluation), conducted by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) under contract to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with...

    As states and localities transform their welfare­-to-­work programs in response to the federal legislation, the need to learn about programs that have moved substantial numbers of people into work and off welfare increases.  The two ­year findings presented in this report show the Portland, Oregon, welfare-­to­-work program run between early 1993 and mid 1996 to be among the most successful large ­scale mandatory welfare-­to-­work programs studied, producing large increases in employment and earnings and equally large reductions in welfare receipt for a broad cross section of the welfare caseload.  The positive effects remained very strong at the end of the two ­year period studied, and preliminary data suggest they will continue into the third year.

    This report is the latest from an evaluation of mandatory welfare-­to-­work programs in seven sites called the National Evaluation of welfare-­to-­work Strategies (NEWWS Evaluation), conducted by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) under contract to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with support from the U.S. Department of Education.  The report examines the mandatory welfare­-to-­work program run in Portland (Multnomah and Washington counties).  Through the program, Portland provided employment and support services to a broad cross section of the AFDC caseload, including parents with children as young as one year old.  These people were required to participate in program activities or face reductions in their welfare grants.  Although the program studied was designed and implemented prior to the 1996 reform, its overarching goal was similar to that of the new law:  to foster the self­ sufficiency of adult recipients through increased employment and decreased welfare receipt.  (The program that Portland is running under the 1996 welfare reform law includes some key features of the program studied in this report.

    This report describes the implementation, participation patterns, and cost of the Portland program, and presents estimates of the effects of the program on employment, earnings, and welfare receipt during the two years following people’s entry into the program. To determine the effects of Portland’s program, 5,547 single-parent AFDC applicants and recipients aged 21 and over who attended a program orientation between February 1993 and December 1994 were randomly assigned to either a program group, eligible for program services and subject to participation requirements, or a control group, not eligible for services and not subject to participation requirements (although they could participate in other services in the community). Because randomization makes the two groups similar at the start, any differences in average subsequent outcomes (such as two-year earnings) can be confidently attributed to the effects of the program. These differences, known as program impacts, will be discussed later in the summary and are statistically significant unless otherwise noted. (author abstract)

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