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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Montes, Marcela
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    This presentation describes first-year implementation findings from the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative. AO seeks to improve the ability of students with low basic skills to earn valued occupational credentials by enrolling them in for-credit career and technical education courses at local community colleges as they improve their basic education and English language skills.  

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes first-year implementation findings from the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative. AO seeks to improve the ability of students with low basic skills to earn valued occupational credentials by enrolling them in for-credit career and technical education courses at local community colleges as they improve their basic education and English language skills.  

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Liston, Cynthia D.; Donnan, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Casey's Center for Working Families (CWF) partnered with community college programs across the county to help low-income students access, navigate and complete their community college courses. Detailed case studies show how five of these programs are making a difference. (Author abstract)

    Casey's Center for Working Families (CWF) partnered with community college programs across the county to help low-income students access, navigate and complete their community college courses. Detailed case studies show how five of these programs are making a difference. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Showalter, Thomas; Spiker, Katie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    A new paper by National Skills Coalition and National Youth Employment Coalition finds that well-designed work-based learning opportunities can provide youth with occupational and work readiness training while providing income support for disconnected and at-risk youth. The paper examines four different work-based learning strategies, illustrates key elements of success, identifies challenges, and makes policy recommendations to address those challenges. (Author abstract)

    A new paper by National Skills Coalition and National Youth Employment Coalition finds that well-designed work-based learning opportunities can provide youth with occupational and work readiness training while providing income support for disconnected and at-risk youth. The paper examines four different work-based learning strategies, illustrates key elements of success, identifies challenges, and makes policy recommendations to address those challenges. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Bos, Johannes ; Porter, Kristin; Tseng, Fannie M.; Abe, Yasuyo
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of...

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of credentials. (Edited author preface)

  • Individual Author: Zachry Rutschow, Elizabeth; Cullinan, Dan; Welbeck, Rashida
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Improving the success of academically underprepared students who are in need of developmental (or remedial) education is a key challenge facing community colleges today. Many of these students enter college with little awareness of these institutions’ expectations or a clear model for how to make effective decisions about their academic careers. To help students address these challenges, a number of colleges across the country have looked to success courses (also called study skills, student development, or new student orientation courses). This report analyzes a success course for developmental education students at Guilford Technical Community College in Greensboro, North Carolina, and its impact on students’ psychosocial skills and behaviors and academic achievement.

    After joining Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count in 2004, a national organization designed to mentor colleges through an institutionwide, student success-oriented improvement process, Guilford chose to offer a revised version of its student success course to developmental education students,...

    Improving the success of academically underprepared students who are in need of developmental (or remedial) education is a key challenge facing community colleges today. Many of these students enter college with little awareness of these institutions’ expectations or a clear model for how to make effective decisions about their academic careers. To help students address these challenges, a number of colleges across the country have looked to success courses (also called study skills, student development, or new student orientation courses). This report analyzes a success course for developmental education students at Guilford Technical Community College in Greensboro, North Carolina, and its impact on students’ psychosocial skills and behaviors and academic achievement.

    After joining Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count in 2004, a national organization designed to mentor colleges through an institutionwide, student success-oriented improvement process, Guilford chose to offer a revised version of its student success course to developmental education students, aimed at improving psychosocial awareness and academic achievement. Modeled on Skip Downing’s On Course philosophy and curriculum, it placed an intensive focus on changing students’ behaviors and attitudes, including increasing their awareness of their and others’ emotions, understanding their own learning styles, improving time management skills, and recognizing their responsibility for their own learning. Guilford hoped that these changes in students’ personal habits and behaviors might help them take better control of their academic lives, which would ultimately result in gains in achievement.

    This study employed random assignment methodology to examine the impact of Guilford’s success course. (author abstract)

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