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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    In 2007, the 80th Texas Legislature included a rider to the General Appropriations Act for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The rider directed the agency to coordinate with the Texas Education Agency to develop and implement plans to align adult basic education with postsecondary education. The Coordinating Board, in collaboration with the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Workforce Commission, was directed to determine: the current and projected demand for adult basic education services in Texas; the instructional programs needed for current and future populations; the social and economic outcomes related to providing varying levels of adult basic education services; a comparison of programs offered in other states; and the current organizational structure and agency roles for providing adult basic education services as well as recommendations for achieving state goals efficiently and effectively. Researchers at the University of Houston who conducted the study addressed all of the elements identified in the General Appropriations Act. They surveyed the state of...

    In 2007, the 80th Texas Legislature included a rider to the General Appropriations Act for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The rider directed the agency to coordinate with the Texas Education Agency to develop and implement plans to align adult basic education with postsecondary education. The Coordinating Board, in collaboration with the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Workforce Commission, was directed to determine: the current and projected demand for adult basic education services in Texas; the instructional programs needed for current and future populations; the social and economic outcomes related to providing varying levels of adult basic education services; a comparison of programs offered in other states; and the current organizational structure and agency roles for providing adult basic education services as well as recommendations for achieving state goals efficiently and effectively. Researchers at the University of Houston who conducted the study addressed all of the elements identified in the General Appropriations Act. They surveyed the state of adult basic education in Texas, as well as adult basic education in several other states identified by the Coordinating Board. The researchers also validated all data provided by Texas LEARNS--the organization that is contracted by the Texas Education Agency to provide all adult basic education in Texas. The Coordinating Board developed this report based on the findings by the University of Houston. Appended to this report are: (1) General Appropriations Act, HB 1, 80th Texas Legislature, Section 50 (Page III-57); (2) A Study of the Current Organizational Structure and Agency Roles in Providing ABE [Adult Basic Education] in Texas; (3) Funding Mechanisms of ABE Programs in Comparison States; (4) DRAFT: Identification of Best Practices in Adult Basic Education; (5) Annual Cost of Adult Basic Education Enrollments; and (6) Estimation of Adult Basic Education Return on Investment. (Contains 10 tables and 4 figures.) (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mellard, Daryl; Scanlon, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    A strategic instruction model introduced into adult basic education classrooms yields insight into the feasibility of using direct and explicit instruction with adults with learning disabilities or other cognitive barriers to learning. Ecobehavioral assessment was used to describe and compare instructor-learner interaction patterns during learning center models of instruction and explicit, strategic instruction. The strategic instruction produced a higher quantity of instructional time and greater parity and efficiency in the instructor-learner interaction patterns than learning center instruction, which seems to indicate that explicit instruction is a feasible alternative for adult basic education classrooms. (Author abstract)

    A strategic instruction model introduced into adult basic education classrooms yields insight into the feasibility of using direct and explicit instruction with adults with learning disabilities or other cognitive barriers to learning. Ecobehavioral assessment was used to describe and compare instructor-learner interaction patterns during learning center models of instruction and explicit, strategic instruction. The strategic instruction produced a higher quantity of instructional time and greater parity and efficiency in the instructor-learner interaction patterns than learning center instruction, which seems to indicate that explicit instruction is a feasible alternative for adult basic education classrooms. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2015

    This set of SSRC Selections focuses on adult basic education. Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

    This set of SSRC Selections focuses on adult basic education. Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

  • Individual Author: Tout, Dave; Schmitt, Mary Jane
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    Numeracy is an essential skill. In the United States, it may be the cognitive skill that most highly correlates with economic success (Murnane, Willet, & Levy, 1995). It is thus troubling that some segments of the population have been found to be much less numerate than others, limiting their potential to fully participate in and benefit from what society has to offer. The U.S. adult basic education (ABE) system has yet to sufficiently address the gap between those who are less numerate and those who are more numerate. Research on numeracy is minimal. Instructional practice is often constrained by commercial publications and standardized tests and often operates from an outdated notion of what constitutes "basic math." Policy has yet to recognize numeracy as an essential part of being "literate" enough to negotiate the demands of the contemporary workplace and modern life.

    Even so, this is also a particularly active, promising time in the developmental trajectory of adult numeracy education. In 2000, two compendia concerned with how adults use and...

    Numeracy is an essential skill. In the United States, it may be the cognitive skill that most highly correlates with economic success (Murnane, Willet, & Levy, 1995). It is thus troubling that some segments of the population have been found to be much less numerate than others, limiting their potential to fully participate in and benefit from what society has to offer. The U.S. adult basic education (ABE) system has yet to sufficiently address the gap between those who are less numerate and those who are more numerate. Research on numeracy is minimal. Instructional practice is often constrained by commercial publications and standardized tests and often operates from an outdated notion of what constitutes "basic math." Policy has yet to recognize numeracy as an essential part of being "literate" enough to negotiate the demands of the contemporary workplace and modern life.

    Even so, this is also a particularly active, promising time in the developmental trajectory of adult numeracy education. In 2000, two compendia concerned with how adults use and learn mathematics were published. Numeracy is treated as a distinct domain in the international Adult Literacy and Lifeskills (ALL) assessment survey to be conducted in 2002; the National Science Foundation (NSF) has for the first time funded a major mathematics curriculum project for adults enrolled in adult basic and adult secondary education programs; and in July 2000 a conference was held that brought together researchers and practitioners from twelve countries to discuss a wide range of emergent issues in the field of adult numeracy. The time thus seems ripe to examine just how far the field of adult numeracy has come, how far it yet needs to go, and where it might look for models of progress and accomplishment. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ziegler, Mary; Ebert, Olga; Cope, Gail
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    Welfare reform legislation in Tennessee provided adult basic education classes for welfare recipients whose literacy skills were below ninth grade. Although more than half of those eligible enrolled in adult basic education, many dropped out. The Completion Bonus, a cash incentive program, was instituted to encourage the completion of education and employment outcomes. This study focused on the role that cash incentives play in encouraging welfare recipients to make progress in adult basic education. Results showed that the incentive increased the number of participants who remained in an adult education program long enough to achieve academic outcomes. (author abstract)

    Welfare reform legislation in Tennessee provided adult basic education classes for welfare recipients whose literacy skills were below ninth grade. Although more than half of those eligible enrolled in adult basic education, many dropped out. The Completion Bonus, a cash incentive program, was instituted to encourage the completion of education and employment outcomes. This study focused on the role that cash incentives play in encouraging welfare recipients to make progress in adult basic education. Results showed that the incentive increased the number of participants who remained in an adult education program long enough to achieve academic outcomes. (author abstract)

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