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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Pinkett, Randal; Jones, Christopher; Crumel, Kenya ; Dong, Jie; Vandawalker, Melissa; Locke, Gretchen ; Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the...

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the period covered by Phase I of the evaluation solidifying partner roles and responsibilities and developing the systems and procedures needed to accommodate this new and complex approach to providing affordable housing for people with disabilities. The pace of attracting properties and units to the program and leasing units has been slower than HUD and grantees expected for a variety of reasons, such as tight housing market conditions (high-price and low-vacancy), difficulty aligning housing and services, program requirements, and location mismatch. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Woolf, Steven H.; Aron, Laudan
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2018

    White Americans are dying at higher rates from drugs, alcohol, and suicides. And the sharpest increases are happening in rural counties, often in regions with long-standing social and economic challenges. The reasons behind these increases are unclear and complex. The opioid epidemic plays a role but is just one part of a larger public health crisis. Life expectancy in the US as a whole has fallen for the second year in a row, and the nation’s health relative to other countries has been declining for decades. Some combination of factors in American life must explain why the rise in mortality is greatest among white, middle-aged adults and certain rural communities. Possibilities include the collapse of industries and the local economies they supported, greater social isolation, economic hardship, and distress among white workers over losing the security their parents’ generation once enjoyed. Also, over the past 30 years, income inequality and other social divides have widened, middle-class incomes have stagnated, and poverty rates have exceeded those of most rich countries.  ...

    White Americans are dying at higher rates from drugs, alcohol, and suicides. And the sharpest increases are happening in rural counties, often in regions with long-standing social and economic challenges. The reasons behind these increases are unclear and complex. The opioid epidemic plays a role but is just one part of a larger public health crisis. Life expectancy in the US as a whole has fallen for the second year in a row, and the nation’s health relative to other countries has been declining for decades. Some combination of factors in American life must explain why the rise in mortality is greatest among white, middle-aged adults and certain rural communities. Possibilities include the collapse of industries and the local economies they supported, greater social isolation, economic hardship, and distress among white workers over losing the security their parents’ generation once enjoyed. Also, over the past 30 years, income inequality and other social divides have widened, middle-class incomes have stagnated, and poverty rates have exceeded those of most rich countries.  Recent legislation and regulations, however, may prolong or intensify the economic burden on the middle class and weaken access to health care and safety net programs. The consequences of these choices are dire—not only more deaths and illness, but also escalating health care costs, a sicker workforce, and a less competitive economy. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Northrop, Rebecca; Jones, Christopher; Laluces, Dalton; Green, La Tonya; Crumel, Kenya; Vandawalker, Melissa; Henry, Meghan; Solari, Claudia D.; Locke, Gretchen; Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the...

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the period covered by Phase I of the evaluation solidifying partner roles and responsibilities and developing the systems and procedures needed to accommodate this new and complex approach to providing affordable housing for people with disabilities. The pace of attracting properties and units to the program and leasing units has been slower than HUD and grantees expected for a variety of reasons, such as tight housing market conditions (high-price and low-vacancy), difficulty aligning housing and services, program requirements, and location mismatch. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Calloway, Erik; Gundersen, Craig; Henchy, Geraldine; Abdi, Fadumo
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the transcript from Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the transcript from Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children? Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The PowerPoint presentation from the webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Calloway, Erik; Gundersen, Craig; Henchy, Geraldine; Abdi, Fadumo
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the Webinar Q&A from Childhood Obesity: What Are the...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the Webinar Q&A from Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children? Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The Webinar transcript can be found here. The PowerPoint presentation from the Webinar can be found here.

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