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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lee, Joanne; Needels, Karen; Nicholson, Walter
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This is a study of short- and medium-term adjustments that recipients of unemployment insurance (UI) make after a job loss in two regions in California. The study uses data from a two-wave longitudinal survey and UI administrative records to focus on such issues as how recipients’ job search strategies change over time, the role of UI benefits and other strategies unemployed workers use to cope with financial hardships, and UI recipients’ satisfaction with the program. (Author abstract)

    This is a study of short- and medium-term adjustments that recipients of unemployment insurance (UI) make after a job loss in two regions in California. The study uses data from a two-wave longitudinal survey and UI administrative records to focus on such issues as how recipients’ job search strategies change over time, the role of UI benefits and other strategies unemployed workers use to cope with financial hardships, and UI recipients’ satisfaction with the program. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth; Needels, Karen; Gould-Werth, Alix; Patnaik, Ankita; Lee, Joanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report for the Department of Labor examines Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) programs, which help qualifying unemployment insurance recipients set up a business in lieu of seeking a new job. In addition to providing a weekly self-employment allowance, SEA programs typically partnered with other organizations to provide participants with important business development supports, including counseling, mentoring, or training. Researchers examined states’ motivation for establishing SEA programs, states’ experiences with implementing a program, and outcomes of SEA participants and their businesses. (Author abstract)

    This report for the Department of Labor examines Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) programs, which help qualifying unemployment insurance recipients set up a business in lieu of seeking a new job. In addition to providing a weekly self-employment allowance, SEA programs typically partnered with other organizations to provide participants with important business development supports, including counseling, mentoring, or training. Researchers examined states’ motivation for establishing SEA programs, states’ experiences with implementing a program, and outcomes of SEA participants and their businesses. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Baum, Sandy; Steele, Patricia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief explores demographic differences in graduate school enrollment and completion. Students from higher-income backgrounds are more likely than others to enroll, more likely to complete their programs, and more likely to earn degrees likely to generate high earnings. When four-year college graduates from lower-income backgrounds do continue their education beyond college, they are more likely than those from higher-income backgrounds to seek master’s degrees, which yield a considerably lower earnings premium than doctoral and professional degrees. Black college graduates—who make up a much smaller share of their age group than white and Asian college graduates—are actually more likely than those from other racial and ethnic groups to go to graduate school. But they disproportionately enroll in master’s degree programs and about one-quarter of black master’s degree students attend for-profit institutions. (Author abstract)

    This brief explores demographic differences in graduate school enrollment and completion. Students from higher-income backgrounds are more likely than others to enroll, more likely to complete their programs, and more likely to earn degrees likely to generate high earnings. When four-year college graduates from lower-income backgrounds do continue their education beyond college, they are more likely than those from higher-income backgrounds to seek master’s degrees, which yield a considerably lower earnings premium than doctoral and professional degrees. Black college graduates—who make up a much smaller share of their age group than white and Asian college graduates—are actually more likely than those from other racial and ethnic groups to go to graduate school. But they disproportionately enroll in master’s degree programs and about one-quarter of black master’s degree students attend for-profit institutions. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wheaton, Laura; Lynch, Victoria; Johnson, Martha C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Galvez, Martha M.; Simington, Jasmine; Treskon, Mark
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report explores how public housing authorities (PHAs) granted Moving to Work (MTW) status by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) use their unique policy and fiscal flexibility to help low-income households move to opportunity-rich neighborhoods. Policy and programs adopted through MTW include changes to the tenant-based Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program or policies that increase the affordable housing supply in opportunity neighborhoods through the project-based voucher (PBV) program. We draw from an extensive review of publicly available MTW agency plans and reports that document each PHA’s initiatives. (Author abstract)

    This report explores how public housing authorities (PHAs) granted Moving to Work (MTW) status by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) use their unique policy and fiscal flexibility to help low-income households move to opportunity-rich neighborhoods. Policy and programs adopted through MTW include changes to the tenant-based Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program or policies that increase the affordable housing supply in opportunity neighborhoods through the project-based voucher (PBV) program. We draw from an extensive review of publicly available MTW agency plans and reports that document each PHA’s initiatives. (Author abstract)

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