Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract...

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hedge, Jerry W.; Rineer, Jennifer R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Organizational life has become less predictable in today’s rapidly changing workplace. Workers must make career decisions within an increasingly uncertain organizational, societal, and global environment. Businesses face the same evolving landscape, making it difficult for them to anticipate their employees’ needs, desires, and likely career directions. Career pathways systems can provide the structure that is vital for career progression, helping people develop competencies designed to increase employability while helping organizations develop employees strategically, build engagement, and improve retention. In our focus on the workplace, we underscore the need for more holistic, data-driven individual and organizational perspectives on career growth and success; we describe how a career pathways framework can contribute to these goals. We offer directions for future research to promote career growth and success for individuals, and to help employers create or strengthen career pathways systems that will reduce bias and enhance organizational performance by supporting the...

    Organizational life has become less predictable in today’s rapidly changing workplace. Workers must make career decisions within an increasingly uncertain organizational, societal, and global environment. Businesses face the same evolving landscape, making it difficult for them to anticipate their employees’ needs, desires, and likely career directions. Career pathways systems can provide the structure that is vital for career progression, helping people develop competencies designed to increase employability while helping organizations develop employees strategically, build engagement, and improve retention. In our focus on the workplace, we underscore the need for more holistic, data-driven individual and organizational perspectives on career growth and success; we describe how a career pathways framework can contribute to these goals. We offer directions for future research to promote career growth and success for individuals, and to help employers create or strengthen career pathways systems that will reduce bias and enhance organizational performance by supporting the advancement of their employees. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cramer, Lindsey; Goff, Margaret; Peterson, Bryce; Sandstrom, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Relationships between children and their parents are the foundation on which children learn how to form and sustain healthy relationships. Disrupting those relationships—by losing a parent to incarceration, for example—can have long-term effects on children and may lead to antisocial behavior, poor school performance, and physical and mental health problems.

    Recent estimates show that 2.7 million US children have a parent who is incarcerated, and more than 5 million children—7 percent of all US children—have had a parent in prison or jail at some point. African American children and children from economically disadvantaged families are more likely to experience parental incarceration.

    To mitigate the risks of parental incarceration for children, some correctional agencies offer parent-child visits in prisons or jails. There are several types of parent-child visits, but many experts believe contact visits, where the child and parent can physically interact, are the most helpful in safeguarding against risk and forging stronger bonds between parents and children....

    Relationships between children and their parents are the foundation on which children learn how to form and sustain healthy relationships. Disrupting those relationships—by losing a parent to incarceration, for example—can have long-term effects on children and may lead to antisocial behavior, poor school performance, and physical and mental health problems.

    Recent estimates show that 2.7 million US children have a parent who is incarcerated, and more than 5 million children—7 percent of all US children—have had a parent in prison or jail at some point. African American children and children from economically disadvantaged families are more likely to experience parental incarceration.

    To mitigate the risks of parental incarceration for children, some correctional agencies offer parent-child visits in prisons or jails. There are several types of parent-child visits, but many experts believe contact visits, where the child and parent can physically interact, are the most helpful in safeguarding against risk and forging stronger bonds between parents and children.

    Although some evidence suggests visiting practices can lessen the trauma associated with parental incarceration, the full effects of visiting remain understudied. Our goal was to help inform researchers and practitioners about what is known about visiting practices, describe key components of visiting practices, and offer recommendations for practice and research. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spillman, Brenda C.; Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Mallik-Kane, Kamala; Hayes, Emily
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wright, Nicole
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2017

    Posted by Nicole Wright, Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse Staff

    Reliable transportation has long been considered an integral part of achieving economic self-sufficiency. The advent of urban sprawl and the movement of high-demand jobs and growing job sectors into suburban areas has made access to affordable public and private transportation a critical element of finding, attaining, and retaining jobs. Affordability and access issues across transportation types, both public and private (car ownership), have been associated with financial and commuting time burdens that are prohibitive for very low-income families, including paying for gas, insurance, and car maintenance and/or long public transit waits, cumbersome and time-consuming...

    Posted by Nicole Wright, Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse Staff

    Reliable transportation has long been considered an integral part of achieving economic self-sufficiency. The advent of urban sprawl and the movement of high-demand jobs and growing job sectors into suburban areas has made access to affordable public and private transportation a critical element of finding, attaining, and retaining jobs. Affordability and access issues across transportation types, both public and private (car ownership), have been associated with financial and commuting time burdens that are prohibitive for very low-income families, including paying for gas, insurance, and car maintenance and/or long public transit waits, cumbersome and time-consuming transfers, and infrequent service during off-peak hours. Research has shown that upward mobility is in fact higher in cities with “less sprawl, as measured by commute times to work.” Conversely, “areas with greater economic and racial segregation, which might make job searches and commuting more difficult for residents of poor regions” tend to have lower income mobility. For this reason, research, practice, and policy in this field have largely centered on helping families overcome these barriers.  

    One of the key trends in transportation research is the study of spatial mismatch and how to overcome it. Although the spatial mismatch hypothesis was first proposed in the late 1960s, it continues to be relevant to policy and practice today. It originally posited that “serious limitations on black residential choice, combined with the steady dispersal of jobs from central cities, are responsible for the low rates of employment and low earnings of African-American workers.” In the context of transportation, this means that the geographic distance between low-income households and where employment opportunities are available must be bridged by affordable transportation options for individuals to have a means of retaining steady employment. This is especially true in light of a 2012 study that found that the “suburbanization of jobs” prevents transit from connecting workers to opportunity in local labor pools. The study ultimately found that the “typical job” is accessible to only 27 percent of a metropolitan workforce in 90 minutes or less via transit.

    Efforts to mitigate spatial mismatch through policy and practice have led to a debate between public and private transit solutions. Many studies have framed this discussion as one of public transportation access programs versus car ownership programs. Multiple studies have suggested car ownership as the more effective option. This is likely, in part, due to the increasing need for individuals living in urban centers to make a “reverse commute.” The reverse commute, defined as the commute from inner city residential locations to employment opportunities found in the suburbs, often requires private transportation due to a lack of public transportation in suburban areas. However, not all research has shown benefits to car ownership programs. A 2015 study found that although improving automobile access is associated with a decreased probability of future unemployment and greater income gains, the costs of owning and maintaining a car may be greater than the associated gains in income.

    Despite the difficulty many people have accessing and affording reliable transportation, one 2014 study, Getting around when you’re just getting by: Transportation survival strategies of the poor, reveals certain “survival strategies” used by low-income families to manage the expense. The authors found that most low-income households are concerned about transportation expenditure, and as a result, carefully evaluate the cost of travel against the benefits of each possible mode of transportation. These strategies include: modifications to travel behavior, cost-covering strategies, careful management of household expenditures, and reductions in discretionary spending. This study concluded that many of these strategies create additional hardship for low-income families. The findings serve to highlight the importance of helping families access transportation that not only bridges the gap to needed services and employment opportunities, but also fits the unique situation of each family. Other studies such as this one have repeatedly shown how crucial transportation access is to self-sufficiency. It is an issue that continues to grow in importance and a barrier that must be broken to create paths out of poverty for families across the country.

    Learn More About Transportation From the SSRC- The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse library contains numerous articles, reports, and stakeholder resources on transportation and its links to self-sufficiency, including: 

    For more resources, check out the SSRC Library and subscribe to SSRC or follow us on Twitter to receive updates about upcoming events, new library materials on self-sufficiency topics of interest to you and more. 

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1935 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations