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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cole, Nancy; Hoaglin, David; Kirlin, John
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is administered by the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). WIC was established in 1972 to counteract the negative effects of poverty and poor nutrition on prenatal and pediatric health. WIC provides a combination of direct nutritional supplementation, nutrition education and counseling, and increased access to health care and social service providers for pregnant, breastfeeding, and postpartum women; infants; and children up to age five. Since 1992, FNS has produced biennial reports on WIC participant and program characteristics based on the WIC Minimum Data Set (MDS) compiled from state management information systems. The 20 items included in the MDS are collected as part of ongoing WIC operations and consist primarily of information related to participant eligibility. This report presents findings from the National Survey of WIC Participants and Their Local Agencies (NSWP). The NSWP was fielded in spring of 1998 and collected information about WIC participants...

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is administered by the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). WIC was established in 1972 to counteract the negative effects of poverty and poor nutrition on prenatal and pediatric health. WIC provides a combination of direct nutritional supplementation, nutrition education and counseling, and increased access to health care and social service providers for pregnant, breastfeeding, and postpartum women; infants; and children up to age five. Since 1992, FNS has produced biennial reports on WIC participant and program characteristics based on the WIC Minimum Data Set (MDS) compiled from state management information systems. The 20 items included in the MDS are collected as part of ongoing WIC operations and consist primarily of information related to participant eligibility. This report presents findings from the National Survey of WIC Participants and Their Local Agencies (NSWP). The NSWP was fielded in spring of 1998 and collected information about WIC participants and their families, through interviews conducted in WIC service sites throughout the country. The NSWP was the first national survey of WIC enrollees since 1988. Over that ten-year period, the WIC program vastly expanded, with the number of enrollees growing from approximately 3.4 million in 1988 to over 8 million in 1998. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ciurea, Michelle; Blain, Alexandra; DeMarco, Donna; Ly, Hong; Mills, Gregory
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    This report describes the activities undertaken during Phase I of the congressionally-mandated evaluation of the Assets for Independence Act (AFIA), which Abt Associates is conducting under contract to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Act provides grants to qualified organizations to establish individual development accounts (IDAs) for low-income individuals. The savings deposited into these accounts are matched, through a combination of federal and nonfederal funds, when program participants withdraw their savings for home purchase, business capitalization, and postsecondary education.

    During the Phase I period, October 2000 through September 2001, significant progress occurred in the two components of the evaluation, the non-experimental impact study and the process study:

    • Non-experimental impact study: This research includes a multi-wave longitudinal survey of a randomly selected national sample of 600 AFIA program participants to assess the effects of program participation on low-income savings, asset accumulation, and other aspects of...

    This report describes the activities undertaken during Phase I of the congressionally-mandated evaluation of the Assets for Independence Act (AFIA), which Abt Associates is conducting under contract to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Act provides grants to qualified organizations to establish individual development accounts (IDAs) for low-income individuals. The savings deposited into these accounts are matched, through a combination of federal and nonfederal funds, when program participants withdraw their savings for home purchase, business capitalization, and postsecondary education.

    During the Phase I period, October 2000 through September 2001, significant progress occurred in the two components of the evaluation, the non-experimental impact study and the process study:

    • Non-experimental impact study: This research includes a multi-wave longitudinal survey of a randomly selected national sample of 600 AFIA program participants to assess the effects of program participation on low-income savings, asset accumulation, and other aspects of family well-being. The participant outcomes will be measured versus a comparison group of AFIA-eligible nonparticipants, using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. During Phase I, clearance from the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) was obtained for the survey of AFIA program participants.
    • Process study: This research includes site visits each year by Abt Associates staff to five or six selected AFIA programs. During these visits, interviews are conducted with program coordinators, program associates, and representatives of financial institutions to understand how programs have been implemented, how they operate, and how program features may affect participant outcomes. During Phase I, visits were conducted to five IDA programs that received AFIA funding through the initial (Fiscal Year 1999) program grants. (author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Turnham, Jennifer; Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2001

    The problem of housing affordability is so great and so closely related to poverty that we cannot expect it to be dealt with at scale through housing programs alone.  Nonetheless, the voucher program has a critical role to play in providing extremely low income households with access to affordable units, particularly in locations where jobs are accessible.  The program can also enable less deeply targeted production programs to serve extremely low income renters with a portion of their units, enabling the creation of mixed income communities.  However, Congress should appropriate funds for substantial increments of housing vouchers that are not tied to the production of rental housing but can be used in rental housing of a family’s choice throughout the community.

    The following report discusses nine issues identified by members of the Millennial Housing Commission’s Consumer Based Assistance Task Force as areas in which the Commission might want to make recommendations.  We summarize background information, based on past and current research and other information on...

    The problem of housing affordability is so great and so closely related to poverty that we cannot expect it to be dealt with at scale through housing programs alone.  Nonetheless, the voucher program has a critical role to play in providing extremely low income households with access to affordable units, particularly in locations where jobs are accessible.  The program can also enable less deeply targeted production programs to serve extremely low income renters with a portion of their units, enabling the creation of mixed income communities.  However, Congress should appropriate funds for substantial increments of housing vouchers that are not tied to the production of rental housing but can be used in rental housing of a family’s choice throughout the community.

    The following report discusses nine issues identified by members of the Millennial Housing Commission’s Consumer Based Assistance Task Force as areas in which the Commission might want to make recommendations.  We summarize background information, based on past and current research and other information on program experience; present several options for the Task Force’s consideration; and suggest a recommended option based on our review of the background information.

    The Task Force believes that the choice of options should be based on the following principles:

    • Maintaining the choice-based nature of the program;
    • Maintaining the program’s cost effectiveness;
    • Increasing the program’s administrative efficiency;
    • Providing assisted households with effective access to housing units in a broad range of neighborhoods;
    • Making the program more attractive to owners of rental housing;
    • Creating successful links to programs that serve special population groups; and
    • Creating effective links to housing production programs.

    (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Finkel, Meryl; Buron, Larry
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the national success rate for voucher holders in metropolitan areas and to explore the factors that affect chances for success (e.g., market tightness, voucher holder characteristics, and housing authority policies and procedures). This study is based on a sample of over 2,600 voucher holders who were issued vouchers in the spring and summer of 2000. The vouchers were issued by 48 Public PHAs who operated in metropolitan areas of the lower 48 states and had at least 800 voucher slots. (author abstract)

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the national success rate for voucher holders in metropolitan areas and to explore the factors that affect chances for success (e.g., market tightness, voucher holder characteristics, and housing authority policies and procedures). This study is based on a sample of over 2,600 voucher holders who were issued vouchers in the spring and summer of 2000. The vouchers were issued by 48 Public PHAs who operated in metropolitan areas of the lower 48 states and had at least 800 voucher slots. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Golonka, Susan; Matus-Grossman, Lisa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Since the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act in 1996, large numbers of welfare recipients have left welfare for employment. However, much of this employment is low-skilled and provides low pay. It is widely recognized that for welfare recipients and other low-income workers to advance in today's economy, they need to acquire technical skills or postsecondary credentials. While access to and participation in postsecondary education is key to the achievement of long-term self-sufficiency, traditional higher education programs are often ill-suited to working individuals with families.

    Recognizing the importance of education and training to career advancement, a number of states, local agencies, and community colleges have adopted innovative program and policy strategies to encourage and support participation in postsecondary education. Recent welfare and workforce development reforms have presented new funding sources and partnerships, as well as some new rules regarding work requirements and participation in education programs. (...

    Since the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act in 1996, large numbers of welfare recipients have left welfare for employment. However, much of this employment is low-skilled and provides low pay. It is widely recognized that for welfare recipients and other low-income workers to advance in today's economy, they need to acquire technical skills or postsecondary credentials. While access to and participation in postsecondary education is key to the achievement of long-term self-sufficiency, traditional higher education programs are often ill-suited to working individuals with families.

    Recognizing the importance of education and training to career advancement, a number of states, local agencies, and community colleges have adopted innovative program and policy strategies to encourage and support participation in postsecondary education. Recent welfare and workforce development reforms have presented new funding sources and partnerships, as well as some new rules regarding work requirements and participation in education programs. (author abstract)

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