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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1987

    This statute provided a range of services to homeless people, including supportive housing programs, emergency shelter programs and continuum of care programs.

    Public Law No. 100-77 (1987).

    This statute provided a range of services to homeless people, including supportive housing programs, emergency shelter programs and continuum of care programs.

    Public Law No. 100-77 (1987).

  • Individual Author: Mead, Lawrence
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1986

    Mead's timely and closely reasoned analysis makes a strong intellectual and moral case for a more authoritative welfare policy. (author abstract)

    Mead's timely and closely reasoned analysis makes a strong intellectual and moral case for a more authoritative welfare policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Garfinkel, Irwin; McLanahan, Sara S.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1986

    The proportion of children living in households headed by single women is more than one in five. There is concern (and some evidence) that children of single parents are less likely to be successful adults. The book discusses the trends in public debate about this problem. In particular, it examines the issue of providing public assistance to such families and whether doing so fosters long-term welfare dependency. (publisher abstract)

    The proportion of children living in households headed by single women is more than one in five. There is concern (and some evidence) that children of single parents are less likely to be successful adults. The book discusses the trends in public debate about this problem. In particular, it examines the issue of providing public assistance to such families and whether doing so fosters long-term welfare dependency. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Foster, James; Greer, Joel; Thorbecke, Erik
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1984

    Several recent studies of poverty have demonstrated the usefulness of breading down a population into subgroups defined along ethnic, geographical, or other lines. Such an approach to poverty analysis places requirements on the poverty measure in addition to those proposed by Sen. In particular, the question of how the measure relates subgroup poverty to total poverty is crucial to its applicability in this form of analysis. At the very least, one would expect that a decrease in the poverty level of one subgroup ceteris paribus should lead to less poverty for the population as a whole. At best, one might hope to obtain a quantitative estimate of the effect of a change in subgroup poverty on total poverty, or to give a subgroup’s contribution to total poverty.

    One way to satisfy the above criteria is to use a poverty measure that is additively decomposable in the sense that total poverty is a weighted average of the subgroup poverty levels. However, the existing decomposable poverty measures are inadequate in that they violate one or more of the basic properties...

    Several recent studies of poverty have demonstrated the usefulness of breading down a population into subgroups defined along ethnic, geographical, or other lines. Such an approach to poverty analysis places requirements on the poverty measure in addition to those proposed by Sen. In particular, the question of how the measure relates subgroup poverty to total poverty is crucial to its applicability in this form of analysis. At the very least, one would expect that a decrease in the poverty level of one subgroup ceteris paribus should lead to less poverty for the population as a whole. At best, one might hope to obtain a quantitative estimate of the effect of a change in subgroup poverty on total poverty, or to give a subgroup’s contribution to total poverty.

    One way to satisfy the above criteria is to use a poverty measure that is additively decomposable in the sense that total poverty is a weighted average of the subgroup poverty levels. However, the existing decomposable poverty measures are inadequate in that they violate one or more of the basic properties proposed by Sen. Stated another way, of all the measures that are acceptable by the Sen criteria, none is decomposable. In fact, the Sen measure and its variants that rely on rank-order weighting fail to satisfy the basic condition that an increase in subgroup poverty must increase total poverty. This note is a first step towards resolving these inadequacies.

    In what follows we present a simple, new poverty measure that (i) is additively decomposable with population-share weights, (ii) satisfies the basic properties proposed by Sen, and (iii) is justified by a relative deprivation concept of poverty. The inequality measure associated with our poverty measure is shown to by the squared coefficient of variation and indeed the poverty measure may be expressed as a combination of this inequality measure, the headcount ratio, and the income-gap ratio in fashion similar to Sen. We generalize the new poverty measure to a parametric family of measures where the parameter can be interpreted as an indicator of “aversion to poverty.” A brief empirical application demonstrates the usefulness of the decomposability of poverty. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1977

    This statute, also known as the “Farm Bill,” included provisions relating to food stamps, nutrition, rural development and agricultural subsidies. 

    Public Law No. 95-113 (1977).

     

    This statute, also known as the “Farm Bill,” included provisions relating to food stamps, nutrition, rural development and agricultural subsidies. 

    Public Law No. 95-113 (1977).

     

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