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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Jones, Amy
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2001

    For many years, the HCVP was known as Section 8 tenant-based. For most communities, HCVP subsidies remain an essential and positive response to affordable housing needs. However, some PHAs have noted a general lessening of community support for their goals and activities, while others have experienced active resistance to new initiatives related to HCVP such as portability and special mobility programs. Why has HCVP become controversial in some localities and not in others? Are such controversies: the inevitable consequence of demographic and economic changes in the community; a disconnect between program rules and street reality; a reflection of the way PHAs operate their programs; or some other, as yet unidentified, factor? Is there anything HCVP administrators can do to prevent a decline in community support for the program or to restore confidence in the program once it has been lost? This guidebook is the end product of a study commissioned by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to look into these and other questions related to community acceptance of...

    For many years, the HCVP was known as Section 8 tenant-based. For most communities, HCVP subsidies remain an essential and positive response to affordable housing needs. However, some PHAs have noted a general lessening of community support for their goals and activities, while others have experienced active resistance to new initiatives related to HCVP such as portability and special mobility programs. Why has HCVP become controversial in some localities and not in others? Are such controversies: the inevitable consequence of demographic and economic changes in the community; a disconnect between program rules and street reality; a reflection of the way PHAs operate their programs; or some other, as yet unidentified, factor? Is there anything HCVP administrators can do to prevent a decline in community support for the program or to restore confidence in the program once it has been lost? This guidebook is the end product of a study commissioned by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to look into these and other questions related to community acceptance of HCVP. Eight PHAs that volunteered to share their experiences were studied in some detail. The purpose of the study was to try to understand the factors that lead to community dissatisfaction with HCVP and to assess the effectiveness of strategies employed by PHAs to eliminate or alleviate community concerns. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    In Pennsylvania, one child in six lives in a rural county – nearly 500,000 kids leading lives that both sharply contrast and closely mirror those of their urban and suburban counterparts. Like all kids, rural children have basic needs that their families and communities must provide – food, shelter, education, and a learning-rich environment. For most kids, rural and otherwise, those needs are happily met. But in Pennsylvania's rural communities, barriers of distance and scarce resources can challenge families and communities to provide those necessities. In these circumstances, Pennsylvania's rural children face unique hardships that can inhibit their healthy growth. Understanding these circumstances is key to taking corrective policy action to enhance the health, education, and well-being of Pennsylvania’s rural children. (author introduction)

    In Pennsylvania, one child in six lives in a rural county – nearly 500,000 kids leading lives that both sharply contrast and closely mirror those of their urban and suburban counterparts. Like all kids, rural children have basic needs that their families and communities must provide – food, shelter, education, and a learning-rich environment. For most kids, rural and otherwise, those needs are happily met. But in Pennsylvania's rural communities, barriers of distance and scarce resources can challenge families and communities to provide those necessities. In these circumstances, Pennsylvania's rural children face unique hardships that can inhibit their healthy growth. Understanding these circumstances is key to taking corrective policy action to enhance the health, education, and well-being of Pennsylvania’s rural children. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Parkes, Rhae; Wood, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    HOPE VI practitioners face fundamental dilemmas in their day-to day task of helping low-wage, often low skilled individuals advance and be successful participants in the labor force. Furthermore, developing and implementing effective strategies to address the issues of affordable housing and economic self-sufficiency is difficult and complex, and often compounded by local, regional and national economic and political issues. In addition, much of the story told to date about HOPE VI has focused on the many challenges. However, there are many successes. This paper highlights some of the successful and compelling stories of innovation and promising practices in developing strategies to sustain HOPE VI Community and Supportive Services beyond the HOPE VI redevelopment phase. (Author abstract)

    HOPE VI practitioners face fundamental dilemmas in their day-to day task of helping low-wage, often low skilled individuals advance and be successful participants in the labor force. Furthermore, developing and implementing effective strategies to address the issues of affordable housing and economic self-sufficiency is difficult and complex, and often compounded by local, regional and national economic and political issues. In addition, much of the story told to date about HOPE VI has focused on the many challenges. However, there are many successes. This paper highlights some of the successful and compelling stories of innovation and promising practices in developing strategies to sustain HOPE VI Community and Supportive Services beyond the HOPE VI redevelopment phase. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fink, Barbara; Widom, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    In order to fully understand how welfare reform influences the well-being of low-income families and communities, we must learn how human service organizations are affected by new welfare policies. This report examines agency staff members’ knowledge about welfare reform, their overall views of welfare reform, their experience of its impact on their agencies, and their expectations of how it will affect them. The findings offer preliminary insights into how new government policies shape other components of the network of service provision that is essential to the well-being of low-income families. (Author abstract) 

    In order to fully understand how welfare reform influences the well-being of low-income families and communities, we must learn how human service organizations are affected by new welfare policies. This report examines agency staff members’ knowledge about welfare reform, their overall views of welfare reform, their experience of its impact on their agencies, and their expectations of how it will affect them. The findings offer preliminary insights into how new government policies shape other components of the network of service provision that is essential to the well-being of low-income families. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine; Zibman, Chava
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    About 2.5 million nonresident fathers are poor and do not pay child support. Most of them face multiple employment barriers, just like poor custodial mothers, but are significantly less likely than those mothers to participate in work-support programs such as training, education, job search activities, or income security programs. Without access to work-support programs, these fathers will remain unable to provide the financial support that their children need. Given that Congress expects poor nonresident fathers to support their children, it may want to consider directing work-support programs to them so that they can fulfill their financial obligations to their children. (Author abstract)

     

    About 2.5 million nonresident fathers are poor and do not pay child support. Most of them face multiple employment barriers, just like poor custodial mothers, but are significantly less likely than those mothers to participate in work-support programs such as training, education, job search activities, or income security programs. Without access to work-support programs, these fathers will remain unable to provide the financial support that their children need. Given that Congress expects poor nonresident fathers to support their children, it may want to consider directing work-support programs to them so that they can fulfill their financial obligations to their children. (Author abstract)

     

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