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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Blau, David
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1991

    This volume presents results from state-of-the-art economic analyses of child care issues in a form accessible to the nonspecialist. The chapters have been written by economists who are engaged in path-breaking work on child care. The results of this research have to date typically been published in academic economics journals or in technical reports to sponsoring agencies. The authors of the chapters in this book have recognized the need to disseminate their findings to a wide audience and have consequently written papers that report their research results in a nontechnical way, but without sacrificing their key insights. The goal of the volume is to bring basic principles and findings of the economic analysis of child care into wide currency among groups and individuals with a strong interest in and knowledge of child care issues but without the expertise to conduct or evaluate sophisticated economic research. Economists with an interest in child care should also find the volume useful. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Introduction - David Blau...

    This volume presents results from state-of-the-art economic analyses of child care issues in a form accessible to the nonspecialist. The chapters have been written by economists who are engaged in path-breaking work on child care. The results of this research have to date typically been published in academic economics journals or in technical reports to sponsoring agencies. The authors of the chapters in this book have recognized the need to disseminate their findings to a wide audience and have consequently written papers that report their research results in a nontechnical way, but without sacrificing their key insights. The goal of the volume is to bring basic principles and findings of the economic analysis of child care into wide currency among groups and individuals with a strong interest in and knowledge of child care issues but without the expertise to conduct or evaluate sophisticated economic research. Economists with an interest in child care should also find the volume useful. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Introduction - David Blau

    Chapter 2: Child Care Policy and Research: An Economist's Perspective - Phillip Robins and William Prosser

    Chapter 3: Public Policy and the Supply of Child Care Services - James Walker and Deborah Phillips

    Chapter 4: The Importance of Child Care Costs to Women's Decision Making - Rachel Connelly and Sandra Hofferth

    Chapter 5: Quality, Cost, and Parental Choice of Child Care - Ellen Eisker and Rebecca Maynard

    Chapter 6: The Quality of Child Care: An Economic Perspective - David Blau 

  • Individual Author: Gueron, Judith; Pauly, Edward
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1991

    From Welfare to Work appears at a critical moment, when all fifty states are wrestling with tough budgetary and program choices as they implement the new federal welfare reforms. This book is a definitive analysis of the landmark social research that has directly informed those choices: the rigorous evaluation of programs designed to help welfare recipients become employed and self-sufficient. It discusses forty-five past and current studies, focusing on the series of seminal evaluations conducted by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation over the last fifteen years.

    Which of these welfare-to-work programs have worked? For whom and at what cost? In answering these key questions, the authors clearly delineate the trade-offs facing policymakers as they strive to achieve the multiple goals of alleviating poverty, helping the most disadvantaged, curtailing dependence, and effecting welfare savings. The authors present compelling evidence that the generally low-cost, primarily job search-oriented programs of the late 1980s achieved sustained earnings gains and welfare...

    From Welfare to Work appears at a critical moment, when all fifty states are wrestling with tough budgetary and program choices as they implement the new federal welfare reforms. This book is a definitive analysis of the landmark social research that has directly informed those choices: the rigorous evaluation of programs designed to help welfare recipients become employed and self-sufficient. It discusses forty-five past and current studies, focusing on the series of seminal evaluations conducted by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation over the last fifteen years.

    Which of these welfare-to-work programs have worked? For whom and at what cost? In answering these key questions, the authors clearly delineate the trade-offs facing policymakers as they strive to achieve the multiple goals of alleviating poverty, helping the most disadvantaged, curtailing dependence, and effecting welfare savings. The authors present compelling evidence that the generally low-cost, primarily job search-oriented programs of the late 1980s achieved sustained earnings gains and welfare savings. However, getting people out of poverty and helping those who are most disadvantaged may require some intensive, higher-cost services such as education and training. The authors explore a range of studies now in progress that will address these and other urgent issues. They also point to encouraging results from programs that were operating in San Diego and Baltimore, which suggest the potential value of a mixed strategy: combining job search and other low-cost activities for a broad portion of the caseload with more specialized services for smaller groups.

    Offering both an authoritative synthesis of work already done and recommendations for future innovation, From Welfare to Work will be the standard resource and required reading for practitioners and students in the social policy, social welfare, and academic communities. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Edelman, Peter B.; Ladner, Joyce
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1991

    The current situation for poor adolescents in the United States is reviewed in this collection of essays, and some strategies and insights for policymakers are presented. The essays of this volume cover the basic interactions of adolescence and poverty from theoretical and anecdotal perspectives. Critical issues of education and employment are discussed, and separate assessments of the difficulties facing poor girls and poor boys in adolescence are provided. After an introduction by Peter B. Edelman and Joyce Ladner, the following essays are included: (1) "Growing Up in America" (R. Coles); (2) "The Logic of Adolescence" (L. Steinberg); (3) "The Adolescent Poor and the Transition to Early Adulthood" (A. M. Sum and W. N. Fogg); (4) "The High-Stakes Challenge of Programs for Adolescent Mothers" (J. S. Musick); and (5) "Poverty and Adolescent Black Males: The Subculture of Disengagement" (R. L. Taylor). (SLD) (Eric abstract)

    The current situation for poor adolescents in the United States is reviewed in this collection of essays, and some strategies and insights for policymakers are presented. The essays of this volume cover the basic interactions of adolescence and poverty from theoretical and anecdotal perspectives. Critical issues of education and employment are discussed, and separate assessments of the difficulties facing poor girls and poor boys in adolescence are provided. After an introduction by Peter B. Edelman and Joyce Ladner, the following essays are included: (1) "Growing Up in America" (R. Coles); (2) "The Logic of Adolescence" (L. Steinberg); (3) "The Adolescent Poor and the Transition to Early Adulthood" (A. M. Sum and W. N. Fogg); (4) "The High-Stakes Challenge of Programs for Adolescent Mothers" (J. S. Musick); and (5) "Poverty and Adolescent Black Males: The Subculture of Disengagement" (R. L. Taylor). (SLD) (Eric abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zill, Nicholas; Furstenberg, Frank Jr.; Peterson, James; Moore, Kristin
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 1990

    Description: The National Survey of Children (NSC) was designed to assess the physical, social, and psychological well-being of American children, to develop a national profile of the way children in the United States live, to permit analysis of the relationships between the conditions of children's lives and measures of child development, and to examine the effects of marital disruption on the development of children and on the operation of single and multi-parent families. Information is provided on the child's well-being, family, experiences with family disruption, behavior, physical health, and mental health.

    Population: Children between the ages of seven and 11, or born between September 1, 1964 and December 31, 1969, living in households in the 48 contiguous states.

    Periodicity: Data collected and available for all three waves – 1976, 1981, 1987.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Child development, fertility, family structure.

    (Information adapted from the...

    Description: The National Survey of Children (NSC) was designed to assess the physical, social, and psychological well-being of American children, to develop a national profile of the way children in the United States live, to permit analysis of the relationships between the conditions of children's lives and measures of child development, and to examine the effects of marital disruption on the development of children and on the operation of single and multi-parent families. Information is provided on the child's well-being, family, experiences with family disruption, behavior, physical health, and mental health.

    Population: Children between the ages of seven and 11, or born between September 1, 1964 and December 31, 1969, living in households in the 48 contiguous states.

    Periodicity: Data collected and available for all three waves – 1976, 1981, 1987.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Child development, fertility, family structure.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1990

    This statute includes within it the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act, which assists working families with the cost of providing child care. It was a primary source of federal funding to help low-income families gain access to child care and after-school programs. 

    Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1990: Public Law No.101-508 (1990).

     

    This statute includes within it the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act, which assists working families with the cost of providing child care. It was a primary source of federal funding to help low-income families gain access to child care and after-school programs. 

    Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1990: Public Law No.101-508 (1990).

     

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