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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Heymann, S. Jody; Earle, Alison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    Parents who are working in the labor force must find ways to meet the many unpredictable time demands of children. Parents must care for sick children who are unable to go to child care or school, meet with child care providers and teachers when children are having difficulties, arrange for special services when children have learning disabilities or behavioral problems, and cope with unexpected failures in child care or other emergencies.

    For some workers, paid sick leave, vacation leave, and personal days can be taken to care for children. Parents who work in jobs that have flexible schedules or where they have autonomy over where and when they get the work done are more likely to be able to take leave to care for their children when necessary. But conditions of employment such as sick leave, vacations, and flexibility vary greatly among jobs. What sick leave and vacation benefits are available to low-wage parents who seek to balance working and caring for their children? What flexibility do they encounter in the work place? If the demands of the job and children’s needs...

    Parents who are working in the labor force must find ways to meet the many unpredictable time demands of children. Parents must care for sick children who are unable to go to child care or school, meet with child care providers and teachers when children are having difficulties, arrange for special services when children have learning disabilities or behavioral problems, and cope with unexpected failures in child care or other emergencies.

    For some workers, paid sick leave, vacation leave, and personal days can be taken to care for children. Parents who work in jobs that have flexible schedules or where they have autonomy over where and when they get the work done are more likely to be able to take leave to care for their children when necessary. But conditions of employment such as sick leave, vacations, and flexibility vary greatly among jobs. What sick leave and vacation benefits are available to low-wage parents who seek to balance working and caring for their children? What flexibility do they encounter in the work place? If the demands of the job and children’s needs conflict, can they draw upon family and friends to help meet their multiple roles?1

    Our data are drawn from two sources: the National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Using the NMES, we compare the experience of low-income working parents with that of middle- and higher-income parents. Using the NLSY, we examine the experience of past welfare recipients. We examine the conditions of working parents who are employed 20 or more hours per week and who are not self-employed. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Reynolds, Arthur J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    In this study, the effects of the Child-Parent Center and Expansion (CPC) Program on scholastic development up to age 14 were reported for a large sample of economically disadvantaged children. The CPC program is a state- and federally funded early childhood educational intervention for children in the Chicago Public Schools who are at risk of academic underachievement due to poverty and associated factors. The CPCs provide comprehensive educational and family support services from ages 3 to 9, for up to six years of continuous intervention. Longitudinal findings from a matched 1989 graduating cohort of 878 program and 286 comparison-group children indicated that (a) any participation in the program was significantly associated with school performance up to eighth grade, (b) duration of participation was significantly associated with school performance, especially for children who participated for five or six years, (c) participation in extended childhood intervention to second and third grade yielded significantly better school performance than participation ending in...

    In this study, the effects of the Child-Parent Center and Expansion (CPC) Program on scholastic development up to age 14 were reported for a large sample of economically disadvantaged children. The CPC program is a state- and federally funded early childhood educational intervention for children in the Chicago Public Schools who are at risk of academic underachievement due to poverty and associated factors. The CPCs provide comprehensive educational and family support services from ages 3 to 9, for up to six years of continuous intervention. Longitudinal findings from a matched 1989 graduating cohort of 878 program and 286 comparison-group children indicated that (a) any participation in the program was significantly associated with school performance up to eighth grade, (b) duration of participation was significantly associated with school performance, especially for children who participated for five or six years, (c) participation in extended childhood intervention to second and third grade yielded significantly better school performance than participation ending in kindergarten, and (d) longer-term effects of the program were largely explained by cognitive-advantage and family-support factors, both of which are theoretically linked to the program activities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lloyd, Susan
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    This article presents some results of a random household survey that examined the effects of domestic violence on the labor force participation of 824 women living in a low-income neighborhood. It also uses data from twenty-four long interviews.

    Eighteen percent of the respondents reported having experienced physical aggression in the past twelve months, and 11.9% reported more severe physical violence. Women who reported abuse were more likely to have experienced unemployment and held more jobs and to report more health problems. They also had lower personal incomes, and were significantly more likely to receive public assistance. At the same time, women who reported abuse were employed in roughly the same numbers as those who did not. Thus, it appears that domestic violence may depress women’s socioeconomic and occupational status attainment over time, but does not affect employment status per se. The article concludes with comments about the implications of the findings for the redesign of public assistance and job training programs. (author abstract)

    This article presents some results of a random household survey that examined the effects of domestic violence on the labor force participation of 824 women living in a low-income neighborhood. It also uses data from twenty-four long interviews.

    Eighteen percent of the respondents reported having experienced physical aggression in the past twelve months, and 11.9% reported more severe physical violence. Women who reported abuse were more likely to have experienced unemployment and held more jobs and to report more health problems. They also had lower personal incomes, and were significantly more likely to receive public assistance. At the same time, women who reported abuse were employed in roughly the same numbers as those who did not. Thus, it appears that domestic violence may depress women’s socioeconomic and occupational status attainment over time, but does not affect employment status per se. The article concludes with comments about the implications of the findings for the redesign of public assistance and job training programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Smock, Pamela J.; Manning, Wendy D.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    The article presents information on a study which examines the characteristics of nonresident parents in the United States and their child support capabilities. This study uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine the importance of having information about both parents. Using descriptive statistics as well as an extension of the multivariate models, the study examines whether significant differences exist in levels of child support received and paid, as reported by the resident parent and nonresident parent, respectively. And, using bivariate tobit models, it assess the relative merits of predicting child support payments using solely the characteristics of the resident parent, compared with using the nonresident parents' or both parents' characteristics. Findings indicate that the characteristics of nonresident parents are central to understanding levels of child support and underscore the need for data collection that includes obtaining information from both resident and nonresident parents. (Author abstract)

    The article presents information on a study which examines the characteristics of nonresident parents in the United States and their child support capabilities. This study uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine the importance of having information about both parents. Using descriptive statistics as well as an extension of the multivariate models, the study examines whether significant differences exist in levels of child support received and paid, as reported by the resident parent and nonresident parent, respectively. And, using bivariate tobit models, it assess the relative merits of predicting child support payments using solely the characteristics of the resident parent, compared with using the nonresident parents' or both parents' characteristics. Findings indicate that the characteristics of nonresident parents are central to understanding levels of child support and underscore the need for data collection that includes obtaining information from both resident and nonresident parents. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dion, M. Robin; Braver, Sanford L.; Wolchik, Sharlene A. ; Sandler, Irwin M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    In a three-stage study, noncustodial parents' psychopathic deviance and alcohol use accounted for significant variance in custodial parents' reports of child support and visitation. In noncustodial parents' reports, compliance with child support, but not frequency of visitation, was related to measures of deviance. Implications for policy, research, and psychoeducational interventions are discussed. (author abstract)

    In a three-stage study, noncustodial parents' psychopathic deviance and alcohol use accounted for significant variance in custodial parents' reports of child support and visitation. In noncustodial parents' reports, compliance with child support, but not frequency of visitation, was related to measures of deviance. Implications for policy, research, and psychoeducational interventions are discussed. (author abstract)

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