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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Modicamore, Dominic
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Colorado is home to thousands of refugees from all over the world who fled violence and persecution to seek safety and sanctuary in the United States. As these individuals and families put down roots in Colorado, they spark a multitude of regional economic impacts through their spending and through the wages they earn working in industries across the economy. To better understand and quantify these economic implications, the Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS) Refugee Services Program (CRSP) commissioned ICF to measure the economic impact of refugees in Colorado. The intent of this study is to understand the economic impact of the public support paid to refugees and their families as well as the economic impact of refugees’ employment earnings over time. This study is unique for four key reasons:

    • first, unlike previous studies, this analysis relied on actual data on individual refugees’ receipt of public services as well as their earnings;
    • second, this study included not only the impact of public spending on refugees, but also assessed the impact of...

    Colorado is home to thousands of refugees from all over the world who fled violence and persecution to seek safety and sanctuary in the United States. As these individuals and families put down roots in Colorado, they spark a multitude of regional economic impacts through their spending and through the wages they earn working in industries across the economy. To better understand and quantify these economic implications, the Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS) Refugee Services Program (CRSP) commissioned ICF to measure the economic impact of refugees in Colorado. The intent of this study is to understand the economic impact of the public support paid to refugees and their families as well as the economic impact of refugees’ employment earnings over time. This study is unique for four key reasons:

    • first, unlike previous studies, this analysis relied on actual data on individual refugees’ receipt of public services as well as their earnings;
    • second, this study included not only the impact of public spending on refugees, but also assessed the impact of refugees’ earnings in the economy – a critical component of understanding the full scope of impact;
    • third, this analysis used a cohort approach in order to capture a static population of refugees across multiple years;
    • fourth, this analysis accounted for the spending of Colorado taxpayer dollars on refugee assistance by subtracting the impact that would have been generated if the taxpayer had retained that income; and
    • separate from the primary economic impact and fiscal analyses, this report also includes three case studies that provide additional insight into refugee resettlement in Colorado. (Author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Heath, Catherine; Harty, Justin; Pergamit, Mike; White, Tammy
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    The transition to adulthood for youth aging out of foster care can be different from the transition experienced by many of their peers. This panel presented new data analysis using studies from the Chafee Phase II demonstration and the National Youth in Transition Database. These analyses identified predictors and determinants of a successful transition and evaluate programs designed to improve outcomes for this population. Catherine Heath (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (author introduction)

    The transition to adulthood for youth aging out of foster care can be different from the transition experienced by many of their peers. This panel presented new data analysis using studies from the Chafee Phase II demonstration and the National Youth in Transition Database. These analyses identified predictors and determinants of a successful transition and evaluate programs designed to improve outcomes for this population. Catherine Heath (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Reid, Megan; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Alan J.; Manno, Michelle S.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    There is a growing interest in policies and programs that assist low-income fathers to stay involved with their children. Numerous programs have been developed to serve low-income fathers and their families, yet few of these programs have been rigorously evaluated. This panel examined the interventions and findings for a selection of rigorous evaluations to determine program effects. Megan Reid (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (author introduction)

    There is a growing interest in policies and programs that assist low-income fathers to stay involved with their children. Numerous programs have been developed to serve low-income fathers and their families, yet few of these programs have been rigorously evaluated. This panel examined the interventions and findings for a selection of rigorous evaluations to determine program effects. Megan Reid (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Courtney, Mark E.; Okpych, Nathanael J.; Park, Keunhye; Harty, Justin; Feng, Huiling; Torres-Garcia, Adrianna; Sayed, Samiya
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study provides the most comprehensive view to date of young people approaching the transition to adulthood from foster care in the wake of the federal Fostering Connections Act. This Act extended the age of Title IV-E eligibility from 18 to 21 for foster care youth. This study focuses on the state of California, an early adopter of the new policy that also has the largest foster care population in the U.S. The study addresses whether extending foster care past age 18 influenced youths’ outcomes during the transition to adulthood; what factors influence the types of support youth receive during the transition to adulthood in the context of extended foster care; and how living arrangements and other services that result from extending foster care influence the relationship between extending care and youth outcomes. (Author abstract)

    This study provides the most comprehensive view to date of young people approaching the transition to adulthood from foster care in the wake of the federal Fostering Connections Act. This Act extended the age of Title IV-E eligibility from 18 to 21 for foster care youth. This study focuses on the state of California, an early adopter of the new policy that also has the largest foster care population in the U.S. The study addresses whether extending foster care past age 18 influenced youths’ outcomes during the transition to adulthood; what factors influence the types of support youth receive during the transition to adulthood in the context of extended foster care; and how living arrangements and other services that result from extending foster care influence the relationship between extending care and youth outcomes. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hodges, Leslie; Men, Fei
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    In February of 2018, 6.7 million American workers were unemployed. Of these workers, one in four had been unemployed for more than half a year (BLS, 2018). Unemployment has been linked to numerous negative outcomes, including increased risk of poverty and of material hardships. A major goal of the Federal-State Unemployment Compensation Program (UI) is to protect individuals and their households against the economic risks associated with unemployment. By providing weekly cash benefits to displaced workers while they search for new jobs, we expect that UI would help households to meet basic needs and act as a buffer against economic hardships. However, with a few exceptions, the prior literature has not paid a great deal of attention to the effects of UI on poverty and material well-being.

    One reason for this lack of attention is that studies interested in identifying optimal benefit levels and optimal program size have primarily focused on how UI affects the behaviors of workers and firms. Another possible reason is that UI is not targeted towards the poor, and helping...

    In February of 2018, 6.7 million American workers were unemployed. Of these workers, one in four had been unemployed for more than half a year (BLS, 2018). Unemployment has been linked to numerous negative outcomes, including increased risk of poverty and of material hardships. A major goal of the Federal-State Unemployment Compensation Program (UI) is to protect individuals and their households against the economic risks associated with unemployment. By providing weekly cash benefits to displaced workers while they search for new jobs, we expect that UI would help households to meet basic needs and act as a buffer against economic hardships. However, with a few exceptions, the prior literature has not paid a great deal of attention to the effects of UI on poverty and material well-being.

    One reason for this lack of attention is that studies interested in identifying optimal benefit levels and optimal program size have primarily focused on how UI affects the behaviors of workers and firms. Another possible reason is that UI is not targeted towards the poor, and helping workers and their households reach or maintain a certain level of economic well-being is not an explicit goal. As a result, there may be less scrutiny of whether the UI program makes participants better off compared to means-tested programs such as SNAP and TANF.

    Nevertheless, from our perspective, poverty and material hardship measures are particularly appealing for examining the effects of UI participation. First, determining optimal benefit levels requires identifying behavioral distortions and identifying what prior studies call the “beneficial insurance effect," such as knowing how UI receipt affects household income and household consumption of goods and services. Second, UI participation among individuals in or near poverty has received greater attention following welfare reform in the mid-90s and following historical rates of unemployment during the Great Recession. However, by focusing only on the poverty effects of UI, we would be ignoring the effects that the program might have on the economic well-being of households who are not in poverty, and we would be assuming that having a certain income level is synonymous with being able to meet basic needs.

    In order to examine whether receipt of UI benefits reduces poverty and material hardships, we use data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) and bivariate probit regression analysis to model jointly the probability of UI benefit receipt and the probability of experiencing poverty and of experiencing housing, utility, food, and medical hardships. In order to account for unobserved differences between individuals who receive UI benefits while unemployed and those who do not, our models include state UI policies as instrumental variables. Similar to prior studies, our preliminary results suggest that UI receipt has a substantial negative effect on poverty, and that UI receipt reduces food insecurity, but not other hardships. By examining UI's effects on economic well-being this study contributes to current understanding of how the program is meeting the needs of workers in the modern economy. (Author abstract)

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