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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Horn, Wade; Sullivan, Halbert; Wetzler, Scott; McDonald, Robin; Avellar, Sarah
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Established in 2005, ACF’s Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood (HMRF) programs provide services to promote strong, healthy family formation and marriage, responsible fatherhood and parenting, and economic stability. This plenary session presented impact findings from Parents and Children Together, a multi-year, rigorous evaluation of a subset of HMRF programs. Robin McDonald (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the panel and former ACF Assistant Secretary Wade Horn (Deloitte Consulting) served as a discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Established in 2005, ACF’s Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood (HMRF) programs provide services to promote strong, healthy family formation and marriage, responsible fatherhood and parenting, and economic stability. This plenary session presented impact findings from Parents and Children Together, a multi-year, rigorous evaluation of a subset of HMRF programs. Robin McDonald (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the panel and former ACF Assistant Secretary Wade Horn (Deloitte Consulting) served as a discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kasehagen, Laurin; Omland, Laurel; Bailey, Melissa; Biss, Charlie; Holmes, Breena; Kelso, Patsy Tassler
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Introduction

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with a range of health outcomes and risk behaviors. In 2011–2012, the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) included questions about adverse family experiences (AFEs). AFE survey questions are similar to ACE questions, except there are no questions about emotional/physical/sexual trauma, and questions are asked of parents rather than children. Although the relationship between ACEs and work/school absenteeism has been studied, the relationships between AFEs of school-aged children, school performance, and buffering behaviors have not been explored in depth.

    Methods

    We examined AFEs and measures of resilience and school engagement among 1330 Vermont children (6-17 years) included in the NSCH, using descriptive, bivariate, and multivariable analyses.

    Results

    The most prevalent AFEs were divorce/separation of parents; family income hardship; substance use problems; and mental illness, suicidality, or severe depression. Adjusting...

    Introduction

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with a range of health outcomes and risk behaviors. In 2011–2012, the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) included questions about adverse family experiences (AFEs). AFE survey questions are similar to ACE questions, except there are no questions about emotional/physical/sexual trauma, and questions are asked of parents rather than children. Although the relationship between ACEs and work/school absenteeism has been studied, the relationships between AFEs of school-aged children, school performance, and buffering behaviors have not been explored in depth.

    Methods

    We examined AFEs and measures of resilience and school engagement among 1330 Vermont children (6-17 years) included in the NSCH, using descriptive, bivariate, and multivariable analyses.

    Results

    The most prevalent AFEs were divorce/separation of parents; family income hardship; substance use problems; and mental illness, suicidality, or severe depression. Adjusting for sex, age, special health care needs, poverty level, and maternal physical/mental-emotional health status, children who had three or more AFEs had lower odds of completing all required homework [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-6.3] and higher odds of failing to exhibit resilience (AOR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.8), compared to children having no AFEs.

    Discussion

    Children with three or more AFEs had difficulty engaging in school and completing homework, though poor outcomes were buffered when children showed resilience. Parents, school-based mental health professionals, and teachers could help identify children who may be less resilient and have difficulties completing homework assignments. Preventive approaches to children’s emotional problems (e.g., promoting family health, using family-based approaches to treat emotional/behavioral problems) could be applied in schools and communities to foster resilience and improve school engagement of children. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Craigie, Terry-Ann; Myers Jr., Samuel L. ; Darity Jr., William A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Female family headship has strong implications for endemic poverty in the United States. Consequently, it is imperative to explore the chief factors that contribute to this problem. Departing from prior literature that places significant weight on welfare-incentive effects, our study highlights the role of male marriageability in explaining the prevalence of never-married female family headship for blacks and whites. Specifically, we examine racial differences in the effect of male marriageability on never-married female headship from 1980 to 2010. By exploiting data from IPUMS-USA (N = 4,958,722) and exogenous variation from state-level sentencing reforms, the study finds that the decline in the relative supply of marriageable males significantly increases the incidence of never-married female family headship for blacks but not for whites. (Author abstract)

     

    Female family headship has strong implications for endemic poverty in the United States. Consequently, it is imperative to explore the chief factors that contribute to this problem. Departing from prior literature that places significant weight on welfare-incentive effects, our study highlights the role of male marriageability in explaining the prevalence of never-married female family headship for blacks and whites. Specifically, we examine racial differences in the effect of male marriageability on never-married female headship from 1980 to 2010. By exploiting data from IPUMS-USA (N = 4,958,722) and exogenous variation from state-level sentencing reforms, the study finds that the decline in the relative supply of marriageable males significantly increases the incidence of never-married female family headship for blacks but not for whites. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Hadfield, Kristin; Amos, Margaret; Ungar, Michael; Gosselin, Julie; Ganong, Lawrence
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Many children experience multiple family transitions as their parents move into and out of romantic relationships. The instability hypothesis is a stress mediation model that suggests that family transitions cause stress and that this stress leads to worse developmental outcomes. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the evidence base for this hypothesis. Thirty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria. Most reports were secondary analyses of American longitudinal data sets. The support for the instability hypothesis was mixed, with many studies finding no evidence, or evidence only for certain groups, types of transitions, or outcomes. Protective factors and processes that prevent transitions from being stressful may explain some of the variability. Results suggest the need to empirically and theoretically differentiate relationship formation from dissolution, to examine effects of fathers' transitions, to include more and different types of outcomes, and to conduct this research within a broader variety of contexts. (Author abstract)

    Many children experience multiple family transitions as their parents move into and out of romantic relationships. The instability hypothesis is a stress mediation model that suggests that family transitions cause stress and that this stress leads to worse developmental outcomes. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the evidence base for this hypothesis. Thirty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria. Most reports were secondary analyses of American longitudinal data sets. The support for the instability hypothesis was mixed, with many studies finding no evidence, or evidence only for certain groups, types of transitions, or outcomes. Protective factors and processes that prevent transitions from being stressful may explain some of the variability. Results suggest the need to empirically and theoretically differentiate relationship formation from dissolution, to examine effects of fathers' transitions, to include more and different types of outcomes, and to conduct this research within a broader variety of contexts. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kalmijn, Matthijs
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Data on secondary school children in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden show that large differences exist in family structure within the minority population: In some groups, father absence is more common than among natives; in others, it is less common. These patterns reflect the differences in family structure in the origin countries, but the migration process also plays a role. Next, it is found that father absence has negative effects on immigrant children’s well-being, but these effects appear weaker in minority groups where father absence is more common. Heterogeneous effects are interpreted in terms of different degrees of institutionalization of father absence in different minority groups. (Author abstract)

     

    Data on secondary school children in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden show that large differences exist in family structure within the minority population: In some groups, father absence is more common than among natives; in others, it is less common. These patterns reflect the differences in family structure in the origin countries, but the migration process also plays a role. Next, it is found that father absence has negative effects on immigrant children’s well-being, but these effects appear weaker in minority groups where father absence is more common. Heterogeneous effects are interpreted in terms of different degrees of institutionalization of father absence in different minority groups. (Author abstract)

     

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