Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Fan, Z. Joyce; Black, Callie; Felver, Barbara E. M.; Lucenko, Barbara A.; Danielson, Taylor
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report provides demographic and employment information for those participants enrolled in the Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) program during the first year of its five-year implementation period. BEST offers evidence-based supported employment services to individuals with severe mental illnesses and co-occurring substance disorders in an effort to reduce long-term unemployment and improve participant well-being. Of the 102 participants who enrolled in the first year of the program, 57% were unemployed for the entirety of the year prior to joining the program. Participants in Grant and Clark counties received intensive supported employment services and other types of mental health outpatient services to manage their behavioral health needs. Preliminary comparisons of pre- and post-enrollment employment rates indicate that participant employed increased by 23%, with 53% of all participants having some form of employment following enrollment in the program. Future analyses will focus on longer-term outcomes and will include a statically matched comparison group to control...

    This report provides demographic and employment information for those participants enrolled in the Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) program during the first year of its five-year implementation period. BEST offers evidence-based supported employment services to individuals with severe mental illnesses and co-occurring substance disorders in an effort to reduce long-term unemployment and improve participant well-being. Of the 102 participants who enrolled in the first year of the program, 57% were unemployed for the entirety of the year prior to joining the program. Participants in Grant and Clark counties received intensive supported employment services and other types of mental health outpatient services to manage their behavioral health needs. Preliminary comparisons of pre- and post-enrollment employment rates indicate that participant employed increased by 23%, with 53% of all participants having some form of employment following enrollment in the program. Future analyses will focus on longer-term outcomes and will include a statically matched comparison group to control for other sources of change. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    To combat the public health crisis associated with the opioid overdose epidemic, HHS will host an Opioid Code-a-Thon on December 6-7, 2017 to develop data driven solutions to combat the opioid epidemic. This Data Brief presents an overview of the data sources that could be leveraged to study the opioid crisis within each of the five HHS strategic areas, highlights some of the key research questions within these areas, and summarizes data linking strategies that can be used to support research on opioids. This brief is based on a forthcoming ASPE report that will provide expanded details and examples of data sources and linkages for studying the opioid crisis. The brief is intended to inform participants in HHS' Opioid Code-a-Thon and to encourage new studies that use existing data to generate information that improves the understanding of opioid addiction, overdoses, and the populations that are affected by the opioid crisis. (Author abstract) 

    To combat the public health crisis associated with the opioid overdose epidemic, HHS will host an Opioid Code-a-Thon on December 6-7, 2017 to develop data driven solutions to combat the opioid epidemic. This Data Brief presents an overview of the data sources that could be leveraged to study the opioid crisis within each of the five HHS strategic areas, highlights some of the key research questions within these areas, and summarizes data linking strategies that can be used to support research on opioids. This brief is based on a forthcoming ASPE report that will provide expanded details and examples of data sources and linkages for studying the opioid crisis. The brief is intended to inform participants in HHS' Opioid Code-a-Thon and to encourage new studies that use existing data to generate information that improves the understanding of opioid addiction, overdoses, and the populations that are affected by the opioid crisis. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hammond, Ivy; Eastman, Andrea Lane; Leventhal, John M.; Putnam-Hornstein, Emily
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Background. Existing literature has documented a strong relationship between parental mental illness and child maltreatment, but little is known about the prevalence of mental illness among childbearing women. In the present study, linked administrative records were used to identify the prevalence of maternal mental health (MH) disorders documented at birth and determine the associated likelihood of maltreatment reports during infancy. Materials and Methods. Vital records for California’s 2006 birth cohort were linked to hospital discharge and Child Protective Services (CPS) records. The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) billing codes from the mother’s delivery hospitalization were used to determine diagnosed maternal MH disorders for 551,232 infants born in 2006, and reports of alleged maltreatment were documented from CPS records. Vital birth records were used to control for sociodemographic factors. Finally, the associated risk of reported maltreatment during the first year of life was examined using...

    Background. Existing literature has documented a strong relationship between parental mental illness and child maltreatment, but little is known about the prevalence of mental illness among childbearing women. In the present study, linked administrative records were used to identify the prevalence of maternal mental health (MH) disorders documented at birth and determine the associated likelihood of maltreatment reports during infancy. Materials and Methods. Vital records for California’s 2006 birth cohort were linked to hospital discharge and Child Protective Services (CPS) records. The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) billing codes from the mother’s delivery hospitalization were used to determine diagnosed maternal MH disorders for 551,232 infants born in 2006, and reports of alleged maltreatment were documented from CPS records. Vital birth records were used to control for sociodemographic factors. Finally, the associated risk of reported maltreatment during the first year of life was examined using generalized linear models. Results. Among infants in this statewide birth cohort, 2.8% were born to a mother with a documented MH disorder, of which 41.3% had documented maternal substance abuse issues versus less than 0.5% of infants born to mothers without a diagnosed MH disorder. Further, 34.6% of infants born to mothers with a MH disorder were reported to CPS within one year, and a majority of those reports were made within the first month of life (77.2%). In contrast, among children born to mothers without a MH disorder, 4.4% were reported to CPS during infancy. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, the rate of CPS reports during infancy for infants born to mothers with a MH disorder but no substance use disorder was 2.6 times that of infants born to mothers without a MH disorder (95% CI = 2.47, 2.73). Among infants born to mothers with MH and substance use disorders, the rate of CPS reports during infancy was 5.69 times that of infants born to mothers without a MH disorder (95% CI = 5.51, 5.87). Conclusions. Administrative records provide a method for identifying infants born to mothers with MH disorders, enabling researchers to track rates over time and generate population-level data to inform policy development and improve service delivery. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hui, Katrina; Angelotta, Cara; Fisher, Carl E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    In July 2016, Tennessee allowed its ‘fetal-assault’ statute to expire. This controversial law was the first to criminalize substance use explicitly during pregnancy. While the law’s expiration is a positive development, its enactment 2 years prior reflects a growing trend in pregnancy control measures in the United States, where there has been a dramatic increase in punitive policies toward women who use alcohol during pregnancy. These measures are part of a broader surge in restrictive provisions regarding sexual and reproductive health; 30% of all such restrictions enacted since 1973 have been established only during the past 6 years. Unlike Tennessee, more than one-third of US states punish pregnant women for substance use through pre-existing laws, erecting considerable barriers to treatment and co-opting the medical profession through mandatory testing and reporting. Although the United States is an outlier in this respect, these practices deserve special attention, both to advocate for change and to caution against the international adoption of similar policies, an ever-...

    In July 2016, Tennessee allowed its ‘fetal-assault’ statute to expire. This controversial law was the first to criminalize substance use explicitly during pregnancy. While the law’s expiration is a positive development, its enactment 2 years prior reflects a growing trend in pregnancy control measures in the United States, where there has been a dramatic increase in punitive policies toward women who use alcohol during pregnancy. These measures are part of a broader surge in restrictive provisions regarding sexual and reproductive health; 30% of all such restrictions enacted since 1973 have been established only during the past 6 years. Unlike Tennessee, more than one-third of US states punish pregnant women for substance use through pre-existing laws, erecting considerable barriers to treatment and co-opting the medical profession through mandatory testing and reporting. Although the United States is an outlier in this respect, these practices deserve special attention, both to advocate for change and to caution against the international adoption of similar policies, an ever-present risk, as long as the criminalization of substance use can be seized upon for political gain (as demonstrated by events in the Philippines). States should, instead, work towards comprehensive treatment of women with substance use disorders, an essential public health need. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Singh, Gopal K. ; Kogan, Michael D. ; Slifkin, Rebecca T.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Appalachia—a region that stretches from Mississippi to New York—has historically been recognized as a socially and economically disadvantaged part of the United States, and growing evidence suggests that health disparities between it and the rest of the country are widening. We compared infant mortality and life expectancy disparities in Appalachia to those outside the region during the period 1990–2013. We found that infant mortality disparities widened for both whites and blacks, with infant mortality 16 percent higher in Appalachia in 2009–13, and the region’s deficit in life expectancy increased from 0.6 years in 1990–92 to 2.4 years in 2009–13. The association between area poverty and life expectancy was stronger in Appalachia than in the rest of the United States. We found wide health disparities, including a thirteen-year gap in life expectancy among black men in high-poverty areas of Appalachia, compared to white women in low-poverty areas elsewhere. Higher mortality in Appalachia from cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases or chronic...

    Appalachia—a region that stretches from Mississippi to New York—has historically been recognized as a socially and economically disadvantaged part of the United States, and growing evidence suggests that health disparities between it and the rest of the country are widening. We compared infant mortality and life expectancy disparities in Appalachia to those outside the region during the period 1990–2013. We found that infant mortality disparities widened for both whites and blacks, with infant mortality 16 percent higher in Appalachia in 2009–13, and the region’s deficit in life expectancy increased from 0.6 years in 1990–92 to 2.4 years in 2009–13. The association between area poverty and life expectancy was stronger in Appalachia than in the rest of the United States. We found wide health disparities, including a thirteen-year gap in life expectancy among black men in high-poverty areas of Appalachia, compared to white women in low-poverty areas elsewhere. Higher mortality in Appalachia from cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, nephritis or kidney diseases, suicide, unintentional injuries, and drug overdose contributed to lower life expectancy in the region, compared to the rest of the country. Widening health disparities were also due to slower mortality improvements in Appalachia. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1998 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations