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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Dank, Meredith; Yahner, Jennifer; Yu, Lilly; Vasquez-Noriega, Carla; Gelatt, Julia; Pergamit, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report summarizes findings from a study to develop and pre-test a human trafficking screening tool with 617 youth in runaway and homeless youth (RHY) and child welfare (CW) settings. The tool was found to be accessible, easy to administer, and effective in identifying trafficked youth in these settings, though additional research is needed. (Author summary)

    This report summarizes findings from a study to develop and pre-test a human trafficking screening tool with 617 youth in runaway and homeless youth (RHY) and child welfare (CW) settings. The tool was found to be accessible, easy to administer, and effective in identifying trafficked youth in these settings, though additional research is needed. (Author summary)

  • Individual Author: Jannetta, Jesse; Okeke, Cameron
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Crime, victimization, and justice system responses greatly affect the life prospects of the most vulnerable Great Lakes youth, restricting their access to ladders of opportunity. This brief describes how crime and justice involvement impact youth development and opportunity generally, and explores the specific crime and justice intervention context in the Great Lakes states. It presents an array of promising and proven policies and practices that have the potential to deliver more safety while reducing juvenile justice and criminal justice involvement and their negative impact on youth. This brief is part of a series recommending policies that will build ladders of opportunity and economic mobility for young people in the six state Great Lakes region—Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. (Author abstract) 

    Crime, victimization, and justice system responses greatly affect the life prospects of the most vulnerable Great Lakes youth, restricting their access to ladders of opportunity. This brief describes how crime and justice involvement impact youth development and opportunity generally, and explores the specific crime and justice intervention context in the Great Lakes states. It presents an array of promising and proven policies and practices that have the potential to deliver more safety while reducing juvenile justice and criminal justice involvement and their negative impact on youth. This brief is part of a series recommending policies that will build ladders of opportunity and economic mobility for young people in the six state Great Lakes region—Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Cusack, Meagan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The HUD-VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines HUD’s housing choice vouchers, administered by public housing authorities (PHAs), with VA case management to offer homeless Veterans permanent supportive housing. The HUD-VASH Exit study, commissioned by HUD and VA, investigated HUD-VASH at four sites: Houston, TX; Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CA; and Philadelphia, PA. The study examined program implementation, the movement of Veterans from homelessness to being housed, and the nature of Veterans’ exits from HUD-VASH. To do this, the research team analyzed administrative data covering 2008 to 2014 at the four sites, and surveyed Veterans and conducted site visits (including interviews with staff and Veterans) between 2011 and 2014. As such the study captures HUD-VASH during a time of transformation. In 2008, HUD-VASH served fewer than 2,000 Veterans. By 2014, HUD-VASH was a major program that housed 53,000 Veterans and had served more than 80,000 Veterans. The study defined three HUD-VASH Veteran groups: (1) stayers (Veterans in the program for at least 600 days), (2) leased...

    The HUD-VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines HUD’s housing choice vouchers, administered by public housing authorities (PHAs), with VA case management to offer homeless Veterans permanent supportive housing. The HUD-VASH Exit study, commissioned by HUD and VA, investigated HUD-VASH at four sites: Houston, TX; Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CA; and Philadelphia, PA. The study examined program implementation, the movement of Veterans from homelessness to being housed, and the nature of Veterans’ exits from HUD-VASH. To do this, the research team analyzed administrative data covering 2008 to 2014 at the four sites, and surveyed Veterans and conducted site visits (including interviews with staff and Veterans) between 2011 and 2014. As such the study captures HUD-VASH during a time of transformation. In 2008, HUD-VASH served fewer than 2,000 Veterans. By 2014, HUD-VASH was a major program that housed 53,000 Veterans and had served more than 80,000 Veterans. The study defined three HUD-VASH Veteran groups: (1) stayers (Veterans in the program for at least 600 days), (2) leased-up exiters (Veterans who exited after leasing up), and (3) nonleased exiters (Veterans who exited before accessing housing). “Exit” was defined as leaving VA case management as recorded in VA administrative data by case managers. The study finds that about half of the leased-up exiters left HUD-VASH for positive reasons such as accomplishing their goals or increased income, but that only a quarter of nonleased exiters had positive reasons for exit. Common negative reasons for exit included housing difficulties, loss of contact with the program, illness, incarceration, and non-compliance with program rules. Specific recommendations to ensure continued program effectiveness converge around (1) improving coordination of HUD and VA processes in HUD-VASH sites; (2) targeting financial resources for specific situations such as move-in, threat of eviction, and transitioning out of HUD-VASH; and (3) ensuring continuity of care for Veterans in the program. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fan, Z. Joyce; Black, Callie; Felver, Barbara E. M.; Lucenko, Barbara A.; Danielson, Taylor
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report provides demographic and employment information for those participants enrolled in the Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) program during the first year of its five-year implementation period. BEST offers evidence-based supported employment services to individuals with severe mental illnesses and co-occurring substance disorders in an effort to reduce long-term unemployment and improve participant well-being. Of the 102 participants who enrolled in the first year of the program, 57% were unemployed for the entirety of the year prior to joining the program. Participants in Grant and Clark counties received intensive supported employment services and other types of mental health outpatient services to manage their behavioral health needs. Preliminary comparisons of pre- and post-enrollment employment rates indicate that participant employed increased by 23%, with 53% of all participants having some form of employment following enrollment in the program. Future analyses will focus on longer-term outcomes and will include a statically matched comparison group to control...

    This report provides demographic and employment information for those participants enrolled in the Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) program during the first year of its five-year implementation period. BEST offers evidence-based supported employment services to individuals with severe mental illnesses and co-occurring substance disorders in an effort to reduce long-term unemployment and improve participant well-being. Of the 102 participants who enrolled in the first year of the program, 57% were unemployed for the entirety of the year prior to joining the program. Participants in Grant and Clark counties received intensive supported employment services and other types of mental health outpatient services to manage their behavioral health needs. Preliminary comparisons of pre- and post-enrollment employment rates indicate that participant employed increased by 23%, with 53% of all participants having some form of employment following enrollment in the program. Future analyses will focus on longer-term outcomes and will include a statically matched comparison group to control for other sources of change. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    To combat the public health crisis associated with the opioid overdose epidemic, HHS will host an Opioid Code-a-Thon on December 6-7, 2017 to develop data driven solutions to combat the opioid epidemic. This Data Brief presents an overview of the data sources that could be leveraged to study the opioid crisis within each of the five HHS strategic areas, highlights some of the key research questions within these areas, and summarizes data linking strategies that can be used to support research on opioids. This brief is based on a forthcoming ASPE report that will provide expanded details and examples of data sources and linkages for studying the opioid crisis. The brief is intended to inform participants in HHS' Opioid Code-a-Thon and to encourage new studies that use existing data to generate information that improves the understanding of opioid addiction, overdoses, and the populations that are affected by the opioid crisis. (Author abstract) 

    To combat the public health crisis associated with the opioid overdose epidemic, HHS will host an Opioid Code-a-Thon on December 6-7, 2017 to develop data driven solutions to combat the opioid epidemic. This Data Brief presents an overview of the data sources that could be leveraged to study the opioid crisis within each of the five HHS strategic areas, highlights some of the key research questions within these areas, and summarizes data linking strategies that can be used to support research on opioids. This brief is based on a forthcoming ASPE report that will provide expanded details and examples of data sources and linkages for studying the opioid crisis. The brief is intended to inform participants in HHS' Opioid Code-a-Thon and to encourage new studies that use existing data to generate information that improves the understanding of opioid addiction, overdoses, and the populations that are affected by the opioid crisis. (Author abstract) 

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