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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Johnson-Staub, Christine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This guide aims to help states look beyond the major sources of child care and early education funding and consider alternative federal financing sources to bring comprehensive services into early childhood settings. Why? Because the sources of child care funding historically available to states have limited supply and allowable uses, and comprehensive services are critical to the success of children – especially those who are most at risk for developmental challenges and delays. The information in this guide can help states go beyond Head Start and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds to build on early childhood systems and improve access to services for children. Partnerships expanding access to comprehensive services in child care and early education settings can take different forms. They can build program staff’s capacity to directly provide services to children, or they can bring other professionals (e.g. mental health consultants, nurses, etc.) and resources into early childhood settings to collaborate with child care and early education staff. In this...

    This guide aims to help states look beyond the major sources of child care and early education funding and consider alternative federal financing sources to bring comprehensive services into early childhood settings. Why? Because the sources of child care funding historically available to states have limited supply and allowable uses, and comprehensive services are critical to the success of children – especially those who are most at risk for developmental challenges and delays. The information in this guide can help states go beyond Head Start and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds to build on early childhood systems and improve access to services for children. Partnerships expanding access to comprehensive services in child care and early education settings can take different forms. They can build program staff’s capacity to directly provide services to children, or they can bring other professionals (e.g. mental health consultants, nurses, etc.) and resources into early childhood settings to collaborate with child care and early education staff. In this guide, we explore partnerships using federal funding streams to provide comprehensive services to children in early childhood settings. These partnerships may be administered directly by child care and early education agencies or by partner agencies with authority over the funds.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sommers, Benjamin; Baicker, Katherine; Epstein, Arnold
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Medicaid currently insures 60 million people, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will extend Medicaid eligibility to millions more starting in 2014. The recent Supreme Court ruling enables states to choose whether to expand Medicaid under the ACA, and many states facing budget pressures are considering cutbacks instead. Yet evidence regarding Medicaid's effect on health remains surprisingly sparse, particularly for adults. Previous research showed that Medicaid expansions in the 1980s reduced mortality among infants and children, though other studies showed little effect. Numerous observational studies have documented a correlation between Medicaid coverage and adverse outcomes among adults prompting some observers to claim that Medicaid coverage is worse than no coverage. However, such studies are plagued by unmeasured confounders that make Medicaid patients sicker than others. One ongoing randomized trial of an expansion of Medicaid in Oregon showed significant improvements in self-reported health and access to care in the first year.

    Traditionally, Medicaid covers only...

    Medicaid currently insures 60 million people, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will extend Medicaid eligibility to millions more starting in 2014. The recent Supreme Court ruling enables states to choose whether to expand Medicaid under the ACA, and many states facing budget pressures are considering cutbacks instead. Yet evidence regarding Medicaid's effect on health remains surprisingly sparse, particularly for adults. Previous research showed that Medicaid expansions in the 1980s reduced mortality among infants and children, though other studies showed little effect. Numerous observational studies have documented a correlation between Medicaid coverage and adverse outcomes among adults prompting some observers to claim that Medicaid coverage is worse than no coverage. However, such studies are plagued by unmeasured confounders that make Medicaid patients sicker than others. One ongoing randomized trial of an expansion of Medicaid in Oregon showed significant improvements in self-reported health and access to care in the first year.

    Traditionally, Medicaid covers only low-income children, parents, pregnant women, and disabled persons. During the past decade, however, several states have expanded Medicaid to cover nondisabled adults without dependent children (“childless adults”), a group that is similar to the population gaining eligibility under the ACA (i.e., all adults with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level). We used this natural experiment to determine whether state expansions of Medicaid were associated with decreased mortality. We hypothesized that Medicaid expansions would reduce mortality, rates of uninsurance, and cost-related barriers to care and would improve self-reported health, particularly among minority and lower-income populations. (author abstract)