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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Wood, Michelle; Gubits, Daniel; Dastrup, Sam; Dunton, Lauren; Wulff, Carli
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Family Options Study, which is a random assignment study examining the impact of housing and services for homeless families in twelve communities across the United States. Topics covered include the study design, findings from the first 18 months, and the services needs of the families involved in the study.
    See fam more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/workforce-innovation-and-opportunity-act-federal-interagency-coordination-state

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Family Options Study, which is a random assignment study examining the impact of housing and services for homeless families in twelve communities across the United States. Topics covered include the study design, findings from the first 18 months, and the services needs of the families involved in the study.
    See fam more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/workforce-innovation-and-opportunity-act-federal-interagency-coordination-state

  • Individual Author: Ahrens, Katherine A.; Haley, Barbara A.; Rossen, Lauren M.; Lloyd, Patricia C.; Aoki, Yutaka
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Objectives  To compare blood lead levels (BLLs) among US children aged 1 to 5 years according to receipt of federal housing assistance.

    Methods  In our analyses, we used 2005 to 2012 data for National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) respondents that were linked to 1999 to 2014 administrative records from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). After we restricted the analysis to children with family income-to-poverty ratios below 200%, we compared geometric mean BLLs and the prevalence of BLLs of 3 micrograms per deciliter or higher among children who were living in assisted housing at the time of their NHANES blood draw (n = 151) with data for children who did not receive housing assistance (n = 1099).

    Results After adjustment, children living in assisted housing had a significantly lower geometric mean BLL (1.44 µg/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31, 1.57) than comparable children who did not receive housing assistance (1.79 µg/dL; 95% CI = 1.59, 2.01; P < .01). The...

    Objectives  To compare blood lead levels (BLLs) among US children aged 1 to 5 years according to receipt of federal housing assistance.

    Methods  In our analyses, we used 2005 to 2012 data for National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) respondents that were linked to 1999 to 2014 administrative records from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). After we restricted the analysis to children with family income-to-poverty ratios below 200%, we compared geometric mean BLLs and the prevalence of BLLs of 3 micrograms per deciliter or higher among children who were living in assisted housing at the time of their NHANES blood draw (n = 151) with data for children who did not receive housing assistance (n = 1099).

    Results After adjustment, children living in assisted housing had a significantly lower geometric mean BLL (1.44 µg/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31, 1.57) than comparable children who did not receive housing assistance (1.79 µg/dL; 95% CI = 1.59, 2.01; P < .01). The prevalence ratio for BLLs of 3 micrograms per deciliter or higher was 0.51 (95% CI = 0.33, 0.81; P < .01).

    Conclusion  Children aged 1 to 5 years during 2005 to 2012 who were living in HUD-assisted housing had lower BLLs than expected given their demographic, socioeconomic, and family characteristics. (Author Abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Feinberg, Emily; Trejo, Bricia; Sullivan, Brianna; Ferreira-Cesar Suarez, Zhandra
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    This article describes the collaboration that supported the development and implementation of the nation’s first contemporary program to use housing as a strategy to promote healthy birth outcomes. Using case study methodology, we examine how two agencies with distinctly different missions, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) and the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), were able to successfully collaborate and develop the program Healthy Start in Housing (HSiH) in 2011. HSiH provides priority access to housing in the city’s traditional family housing developments to homeless and housing insecure pregnant women who have existing medical risks associated with poor birth outcomes. Data were collected from eight key stakeholder interviews, two focus groups with HSiH staff, program documents, and archival records. The contextual factors, chronology of the development of HSiH, and lessons learned were identified from an analysis of the case. We found that recognizing the need for interdependence, having a history of previous interagency collaboration, and clear and mutually shared...

    This article describes the collaboration that supported the development and implementation of the nation’s first contemporary program to use housing as a strategy to promote healthy birth outcomes. Using case study methodology, we examine how two agencies with distinctly different missions, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) and the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), were able to successfully collaborate and develop the program Healthy Start in Housing (HSiH) in 2011. HSiH provides priority access to housing in the city’s traditional family housing developments to homeless and housing insecure pregnant women who have existing medical risks associated with poor birth outcomes. Data were collected from eight key stakeholder interviews, two focus groups with HSiH staff, program documents, and archival records. The contextual factors, chronology of the development of HSiH, and lessons learned were identified from an analysis of the case. We found that recognizing the need for interdependence, having a history of previous interagency collaboration, and clear and mutually shared goals facilitated the development of the HSiH collaboration. The challenges to cross-agency collaboration between the BHA and BPHC were minor but did exist, including difficulty in assessing BHA eligibility at program entry. This case study provides insights to the key components of a unique collaboration that aims to promote healthy birth outcomes and sets the stage for future research to assess the health effects of program participation. (author abstract)

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