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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: MDRC; Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project conducted randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions at two child care agencies in Indiana and Oklahoma. This brief provides an overview of the interventions the BIAS team designed in partnership with these sites, which targeted two primary problems:

    1. Many parents who receive Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) vouchers do not select a highly rated provider, even in states that have a standardized system for rating provider quality,.
    2. Some parents who are required to periodically document their continued eligibility for CCDF subsidies do not complete this process on time, which can lead to gaps in service, loss of funds for providers, and increased administrative burden for agencies.

    One-page site summaries in this brief detail the problem or problems of interest at each agency, the behavioral intervention(s) implemented to address each of those problems, and the findings from the tests of the interventions. (Author abstract) 

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project conducted randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions at two child care agencies in Indiana and Oklahoma. This brief provides an overview of the interventions the BIAS team designed in partnership with these sites, which targeted two primary problems:

    1. Many parents who receive Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) vouchers do not select a highly rated provider, even in states that have a standardized system for rating provider quality,.
    2. Some parents who are required to periodically document their continued eligibility for CCDF subsidies do not complete this process on time, which can lead to gaps in service, loss of funds for providers, and increased administrative burden for agencies.

    One-page site summaries in this brief detail the problem or problems of interest at each agency, the behavioral intervention(s) implemented to address each of those problems, and the findings from the tests of the interventions. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Madill, Rebecca; Bui Lin, Van-Kim; Friese, Sarah; Paschall, Katherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    As of 2015, about one in five children in the United States lived at or below the federal poverty level. Many children living in poverty face multiple risk factors that are negatively associated with school readiness and later achievement. High-quality early care and education (ECE) can help close the gap between disadvantaged children and their more advantaged peers by improving school readiness, reducing risk for grade repetition and special education placement, and increasing high school graduation rates. Importantly, the quality of care matters: ECE settings that offer well-organized, developmentally appropriate learning opportunities allow children to make the greatest gains. The present study asked how low-income children’s access to ECE might differ from that of their higher-income peers, and how child care subsidy policies might be helping to close the gap. (Author introduction)

    As of 2015, about one in five children in the United States lived at or below the federal poverty level. Many children living in poverty face multiple risk factors that are negatively associated with school readiness and later achievement. High-quality early care and education (ECE) can help close the gap between disadvantaged children and their more advantaged peers by improving school readiness, reducing risk for grade repetition and special education placement, and increasing high school graduation rates. Importantly, the quality of care matters: ECE settings that offer well-organized, developmentally appropriate learning opportunities allow children to make the greatest gains. The present study asked how low-income children’s access to ECE might differ from that of their higher-income peers, and how child care subsidy policies might be helping to close the gap. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Rohacek, Monica; Isaacs, Julia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Child care subsidies are critical for the well-being of low-income families, including parents’ economic success and children’s development. To inform state efforts to simplify access to child care subsidies and improve service delivery, this report highlights steps taken and lessons learned by five states that participated in the Work Support Strategies initiative between 2012 and 2015. These states worked to improve child care subsidy access and retention, efficiency of service delivery, quality of client service, and alignment with other benefit programs. The report also discusses the implications of these findings for implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Fund. (Author abstract)

    Child care subsidies are critical for the well-being of low-income families, including parents’ economic success and children’s development. To inform state efforts to simplify access to child care subsidies and improve service delivery, this report highlights steps taken and lessons learned by five states that participated in the Work Support Strategies initiative between 2012 and 2015. These states worked to improve child care subsidy access and retention, efficiency of service delivery, quality of client service, and alignment with other benefit programs. The report also discusses the implications of these findings for implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Fund. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Tran, Victoria; Minton, Sarah; Haldar, Sweta; Giannarelli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    If a child’s parents both work full-time and together earn $25,000 per year, can the family receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if one of the parents is a full-time student and not working? If the family does qualify for a subsidy, how much will they still have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including: the ages of the children; the number of people in the family; income; where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers. (Author introduction)

    If a child’s parents both work full-time and together earn $25,000 per year, can the family receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if one of the parents is a full-time student and not working? If the family does qualify for a subsidy, how much will they still have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including: the ages of the children; the number of people in the family; income; where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Research Department, Illinois Action for Children
    Reference Type: Report, White Papers
    Year: 2017

    The year ending June 30, 2016 saw several significant shocks occur to child care services in Cook County. An unprecedented restriction of eligibility in the Illinois Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) imposed a period of great uncertainty on parents and child care providers alike. This challenge — and the state's continuing budget crisis — reversed Illinois' long-term trend of increasing investments in a robust system of early care and education. In just the second year of the state's efforts to improve child care quality through its ExceleRate Illinois quality rating and improvement system, child care providers faced falling enrollments, unpaid bills and staff layoffs. (Author introduction)

    The year ending June 30, 2016 saw several significant shocks occur to child care services in Cook County. An unprecedented restriction of eligibility in the Illinois Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) imposed a period of great uncertainty on parents and child care providers alike. This challenge — and the state's continuing budget crisis — reversed Illinois' long-term trend of increasing investments in a robust system of early care and education. In just the second year of the state's efforts to improve child care quality through its ExceleRate Illinois quality rating and improvement system, child care providers faced falling enrollments, unpaid bills and staff layoffs. (Author introduction)

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