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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Burd-Sharps, Sarah; Lewis, Kristen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In 2016, the number of young people disconnected from both work and school declined for the sixth year in a row. The 2016 disconnected youth rate of 11.7 percent represents a 20 percent decrease since 2010, when disconnection peaked in the aftermath of the Great Recession—about 1.2 million fewer young people. A large group of young people saw their opportunities expand alongside the expanding economy; the youth unemployment rate was roughly half in 2016 what it was in 2010. But not all young people saw growth: 4.6 million young women and men remain disconnected from both school and the labor market, unmoored from routines of work and school that give shape, purpose, and direction to one’s days, and deprived of experiences that build knowledge, networks, skills, and confidence.

    More than a Million Reasons for Hope: Youth Disconnection in America Today analyzes youth disconnection in the United States by state, metro area, county, and community type, and by gender, race, and ethnicity. Disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, are teenagers and young...

    In 2016, the number of young people disconnected from both work and school declined for the sixth year in a row. The 2016 disconnected youth rate of 11.7 percent represents a 20 percent decrease since 2010, when disconnection peaked in the aftermath of the Great Recession—about 1.2 million fewer young people. A large group of young people saw their opportunities expand alongside the expanding economy; the youth unemployment rate was roughly half in 2016 what it was in 2010. But not all young people saw growth: 4.6 million young women and men remain disconnected from both school and the labor market, unmoored from routines of work and school that give shape, purpose, and direction to one’s days, and deprived of experiences that build knowledge, networks, skills, and confidence.

    More than a Million Reasons for Hope: Youth Disconnection in America Today analyzes youth disconnection in the United States by state, metro area, county, and community type, and by gender, race, and ethnicity. Disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. This report is the first in Measure of America’s disconnected youth series to compare American and European metro areas or to examine disconnection by group characteristics such as poverty status, motherhood, marriage status, disability, English proficiency, citizenship, educational attainment, institutionalization, and household composition for different racial and ethnic groups. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Morgan, Paul L.; Farkas, George; Cook, Michael; Strassfeld, Natasha M.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Pun, Wik Hung; Wang, Yangyang; Schussler, Deborah L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively. Among studies with the strongest internal and external validity, none of the 90 estimates (i.e., 0%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to racial or ethnic bias. Of the 18 estimates for language-minority and ELL children combined, only 3 (16.7%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to language use. Two of the 4 ELL-specific estimates (50%) indicated that children receiving English-as-a-second-language services may be overrepresented in special education. Overall, and replicating findings from a prior best-evidence synthesis, this synthesis indicated that children are underidentified as having disabilities based on their race or...

    We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively. Among studies with the strongest internal and external validity, none of the 90 estimates (i.e., 0%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to racial or ethnic bias. Of the 18 estimates for language-minority and ELL children combined, only 3 (16.7%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to language use. Two of the 4 ELL-specific estimates (50%) indicated that children receiving English-as-a-second-language services may be overrepresented in special education. Overall, and replicating findings from a prior best-evidence synthesis, this synthesis indicated that children are underidentified as having disabilities based on their race or ethnicity and language use. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schmit, Stephanie
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    High-quality child care and early education can build a strong foundation for young children's healthy development; yet, current federal and state child care and early education investments are not sufficient to meet the great need among young children. While these gaps in access to child care and early education are widely recognized, less is understood about how access differs by race and ethnicity. (Author introduction)

    High-quality child care and early education can build a strong foundation for young children's healthy development; yet, current federal and state child care and early education investments are not sufficient to meet the great need among young children. While these gaps in access to child care and early education are widely recognized, less is understood about how access differs by race and ethnicity. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Toldson, Ivory A. ; Crowell, Candice
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The purpose of this project is to provide an analysis of policy issues affecting middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color in the areas of education, health, and pathways to employment. This policy scan and subsequent recommendations will provide valuable background knowledge to inform the future direction of policy efforts for the target population. In addition, findings from this analysis will be used to inform the framing of future policy discussions and implementation at the national, state, and local level. CLASP designed four surveys to gather data about policies and programming affecting men and boys of color. Participants were instructed to select a survey to complete based on their area of expertise. If participants had expertise in multiple areas, they were encouraged to complete multiple surveys. The target audience included anyone involved with providing services, programming, research, or policy on education, employment, and health for males of color. The four surveys included: (1) Middle School Aged Boys; (2) High School Aged Young Men; (3)...

    The purpose of this project is to provide an analysis of policy issues affecting middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color in the areas of education, health, and pathways to employment. This policy scan and subsequent recommendations will provide valuable background knowledge to inform the future direction of policy efforts for the target population. In addition, findings from this analysis will be used to inform the framing of future policy discussions and implementation at the national, state, and local level. CLASP designed four surveys to gather data about policies and programming affecting men and boys of color. Participants were instructed to select a survey to complete based on their area of expertise. If participants had expertise in multiple areas, they were encouraged to complete multiple surveys. The target audience included anyone involved with providing services, programming, research, or policy on education, employment, and health for males of color. The four surveys included: (1) Middle School Aged Boys; (2) High School Aged Young Men; (3) Health; and (4) Out-of-School Young Men. Each survey consisted of demographic questions that detailed participants' sex, city and state of residence, industry, and position type. Ten issues were listed for participants to rank according to their level of importance. Volunteers were then asked to answer open-ended/qualitative questions about the top three issues they chose. The open-ended questions included assessing whether they knew of local or national agencies working to address the issues and whether policy supported initiatives around those issues. Survey results are presented. Transcript of Telephone interviews is appended. (author abstract)

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