Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Shaefer, H. Luke ; Edin, Kathryn ; Fusaro, Vincent ; Wu, Pinghui
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2019

    Since the early 1990s, the social safety net for families with children in the United States has undergone an epochal transformation. Aid to poor working families has become more generous. In contrast, assistance to the deeply poor has declined sharply, and what remains often takes the form of in-kind aid. A historical view finds that this dramatic change mirrors others. For centuries, the nature and form of poor relief has been driven in part by shifting cultural notions of which social groups constitute the “deserving” and “undeserving” poor. This line was firmly redrawn in the 1990s. Did the re-institutionalization of these categorizations in policy have material consequences? In this study, we examine the relationship between the decline of traditional cash welfare during the 2001-2015 period and two direct measures of wellbeing among households with children: household food insecurity and public school child homelessness. Using models that control for state and year trends, along with other factors, we find that the decline of cash assistance is associated with increases in...

    Since the early 1990s, the social safety net for families with children in the United States has undergone an epochal transformation. Aid to poor working families has become more generous. In contrast, assistance to the deeply poor has declined sharply, and what remains often takes the form of in-kind aid. A historical view finds that this dramatic change mirrors others. For centuries, the nature and form of poor relief has been driven in part by shifting cultural notions of which social groups constitute the “deserving” and “undeserving” poor. This line was firmly redrawn in the 1990s. Did the re-institutionalization of these categorizations in policy have material consequences? In this study, we examine the relationship between the decline of traditional cash welfare during the 2001-2015 period and two direct measures of wellbeing among households with children: household food insecurity and public school child homelessness. Using models that control for state and year trends, along with other factors, we find that the decline of cash assistance is associated with increases in these two forms of hardship. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Wood, Michelle; Gubits, Daniel; Dastrup, Sam; Dunton, Lauren; Wulff, Carli
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Family Options Study, which is a random assignment study examining the impact of housing and services for homeless families in twelve communities across the United States. Topics covered include the study design, findings from the first 18 months, and the services needs of the families involved in the study.
    See fam more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/workforce-innovation-and-opportunity-act-federal-interagency-coordination-state

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Family Options Study, which is a random assignment study examining the impact of housing and services for homeless families in twelve communities across the United States. Topics covered include the study design, findings from the first 18 months, and the services needs of the families involved in the study.
    See fam more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/workforce-innovation-and-opportunity-act-federal-interagency-coordination-state

  • Individual Author: Williams, Amanda L.; Merten, Michael J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Research on family homelessness is advancing and often focuses on homeless mothers; yet we know little about their life experiences from their unique perspectives. This gap is addressed in the present study, which involved weekly group meetings during a 3-month period with seven single mothers who were homeless and living in transitional housing. Each week, participants shared stories from their past, current experiences, and future goals, which were recorded using researcher field notes. Phenomenological analysis was used to understand the essence of their shared experiences, and resulting themes indicate participants’ past family relationships, particularly with a maternal figure, systemically affected their current family situations and adult relationships. Family-of-origin adversities and related adult relational difficulties also influenced each woman's sense of identity, ability to create and maintain healthy boundaries, as well as parenting perspectives and behaviors. Implications of these findings for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers are discussed. Results...

    Research on family homelessness is advancing and often focuses on homeless mothers; yet we know little about their life experiences from their unique perspectives. This gap is addressed in the present study, which involved weekly group meetings during a 3-month period with seven single mothers who were homeless and living in transitional housing. Each week, participants shared stories from their past, current experiences, and future goals, which were recorded using researcher field notes. Phenomenological analysis was used to understand the essence of their shared experiences, and resulting themes indicate participants’ past family relationships, particularly with a maternal figure, systemically affected their current family situations and adult relationships. Family-of-origin adversities and related adult relational difficulties also influenced each woman's sense of identity, ability to create and maintain healthy boundaries, as well as parenting perspectives and behaviors. Implications of these findings for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers are discussed. Results suggest that residential transitional programs focusing on development of self might be key resources for permanent transitions out of homelessness, but additional research is needed to empirically verify the long-term impact of such programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dotson, Hilary M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Many homeless women become separated from their children. The purpose of this study is to determine the predictors of entering a shelter with or without children and predictors of being separated from one or more children. Further, the authors also seek to understand the unique experience of homeless mothers separated from children. Findings suggest that women with mental illnesses and those separated from children are less likely to enter the shelter with children. Special needs were not significant predictors for being separated from any children. Focus group findings elucidate the pain separated mothers endure. (author abstract)

    Many homeless women become separated from their children. The purpose of this study is to determine the predictors of entering a shelter with or without children and predictors of being separated from one or more children. Further, the authors also seek to understand the unique experience of homeless mothers separated from children. Findings suggest that women with mental illnesses and those separated from children are less likely to enter the shelter with children. Special needs were not significant predictors for being separated from any children. Focus group findings elucidate the pain separated mothers endure. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fischer, Robert L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    Homeless families face the economic and personal challenges of sparse employment opportunities and child care and nutrition needs, compounded by the loss of adequate housing. The Family Development Center (FDC) is a transitional housing program in Atlanta, Georgia, designed to provide young homeless mothers an opportunity to emerge from what may well be desperate circumstances and begin the journey to economic self-sufficiency. This paper describes the research on programs for homeless families and presents the results of a comprehensive look at the operation and effectiveness of the FDC program during its first 5 years of existence. The work shows that while many families were able to effect notable positive changes in their lives during and after taking part in the housing program. for some the recovery from homelessness was extremely difficult. For even the most successful formerly homeless families-those that secured employment, housing, and other social supports-the escape from welfare dependence and poverty proved very difficult. The paper concludes with a discussion of...

    Homeless families face the economic and personal challenges of sparse employment opportunities and child care and nutrition needs, compounded by the loss of adequate housing. The Family Development Center (FDC) is a transitional housing program in Atlanta, Georgia, designed to provide young homeless mothers an opportunity to emerge from what may well be desperate circumstances and begin the journey to economic self-sufficiency. This paper describes the research on programs for homeless families and presents the results of a comprehensive look at the operation and effectiveness of the FDC program during its first 5 years of existence. The work shows that while many families were able to effect notable positive changes in their lives during and after taking part in the housing program. for some the recovery from homelessness was extremely difficult. For even the most successful formerly homeless families-those that secured employment, housing, and other social supports-the escape from welfare dependence and poverty proved very difficult. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for relevant public policy. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1996 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations