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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Mazelis, Joan Maya
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Norms of reciprocity partially govern social support behavior, particularly in the context of an organization requiring participation in an exchange network. This article focuses on ethnographic interviews with 25 members of the Kensington Welfare Rights Union (KWRU). The social capital KWRU offers members helps them survive, but members can find reciprocity obligations onerous. Reciprocity fosters social capital for those who fulfill norms of reciprocity and hinders social capital for those who violate them. Reciprocity provides an avenue for involved members to build social capital crucial to survival, while it becomes a burden too great for some members to bear. (author abstract)

    Norms of reciprocity partially govern social support behavior, particularly in the context of an organization requiring participation in an exchange network. This article focuses on ethnographic interviews with 25 members of the Kensington Welfare Rights Union (KWRU). The social capital KWRU offers members helps them survive, but members can find reciprocity obligations onerous. Reciprocity fosters social capital for those who fulfill norms of reciprocity and hinders social capital for those who violate them. Reciprocity provides an avenue for involved members to build social capital crucial to survival, while it becomes a burden too great for some members to bear. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: DeVerteuil, Geoffrey
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    This paper illustrates the relationship between government assistance (housing subsidies and/or welfare payments) and housing outcomes, using qualitative methods and a sample of 25 extremely low-income, homeless women at an emergency shelter in Central Los Angeles. The paper seeks to illustrate three specific patterns (identified within the larger literature) to this complex and multifaceted relationship: (1) that the presence of housing subsidies promotes the most positive outcomes overall, such as stability and independence; (2) that, in the absence of housing subsidies, the predictability and amount of welfare become critical in promoting positive housing outcomes; and (3) housing outcomes are least positive for those lacking both housing subsidies and welfare payments. Results largely conformed to these expectations, although less so for the last pattern. (Author abstract)

    This paper illustrates the relationship between government assistance (housing subsidies and/or welfare payments) and housing outcomes, using qualitative methods and a sample of 25 extremely low-income, homeless women at an emergency shelter in Central Los Angeles. The paper seeks to illustrate three specific patterns (identified within the larger literature) to this complex and multifaceted relationship: (1) that the presence of housing subsidies promotes the most positive outcomes overall, such as stability and independence; (2) that, in the absence of housing subsidies, the predictability and amount of welfare become critical in promoting positive housing outcomes; and (3) housing outcomes are least positive for those lacking both housing subsidies and welfare payments. Results largely conformed to these expectations, although less so for the last pattern. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Marr, Matthew D.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has found that Section 8 voucher recipients are often unable to secure apartments outside of high-poverty areas in tight urban rental markets. However, intensive housing placement services greatly improve the success and mobility of voucher holders. Drawing on ethnographic research in the housing placement department of a private, nonprofit community-based organization, I first describe how fundamental problems in implementing the public subsidy program in a tight private rental market generate apprehension among landlords and voucher recipients that can prevent the successful use of vouchers. Second, I demonstrate how housing placement specialists can dispel and overcome this apprehension through a variety of tactics that require extensive soft skills and a deep commitment to the mission of housing poor families. These findings provide support for the increased use of housing placement services to improve success and mobility rates for Section 8 vouchers. (author abstract)

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has found that Section 8 voucher recipients are often unable to secure apartments outside of high-poverty areas in tight urban rental markets. However, intensive housing placement services greatly improve the success and mobility of voucher holders. Drawing on ethnographic research in the housing placement department of a private, nonprofit community-based organization, I first describe how fundamental problems in implementing the public subsidy program in a tight private rental market generate apprehension among landlords and voucher recipients that can prevent the successful use of vouchers. Second, I demonstrate how housing placement specialists can dispel and overcome this apprehension through a variety of tactics that require extensive soft skills and a deep commitment to the mission of housing poor families. These findings provide support for the increased use of housing placement services to improve success and mobility rates for Section 8 vouchers. (author abstract)