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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Bloom, Jacqueline
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2007

    Transitional housing programs offer an array of residential and support services that are designed to help families successfully move from homelessness into permanent housing, while increasing self-sufficiency and life satisfaction. Different models of transitional housing range from those in which individual housing units become permanent with subsidies phasing out, to facilities which house multiple families who at graduation must secure permanent housing. The latter programs are more controversial because they prolong housing instability. Debate exists over whether these programs take money that would be better spent on permanent housing and force families who need housing to receive support services, or whether the comprehensive supports provided assist, at least some families to be more successful in accomplishing goals. Limited outcome research suggests that some transitional housing residents have better outcomes than homeless families exiting shelters, but poorly articulates the process by which programs affect change and how those enrolled believe these experiences...

    Transitional housing programs offer an array of residential and support services that are designed to help families successfully move from homelessness into permanent housing, while increasing self-sufficiency and life satisfaction. Different models of transitional housing range from those in which individual housing units become permanent with subsidies phasing out, to facilities which house multiple families who at graduation must secure permanent housing. The latter programs are more controversial because they prolong housing instability. Debate exists over whether these programs take money that would be better spent on permanent housing and force families who need housing to receive support services, or whether the comprehensive supports provided assist, at least some families to be more successful in accomplishing goals. Limited outcome research suggests that some transitional housing residents have better outcomes than homeless families exiting shelters, but poorly articulates the process by which programs affect change and how those enrolled believe these experiences impact their lives. The primary focus of this research was on the consumer's view of transitional housing in order to understand their experiences and how they assign meanings to them. Participants were current and former residents of a 13 family facility located in a major West Coast city. Grounded interpretive investigation was used to evaluate how these consumers viewed their time in transitional housing, the effect of the program on social networks, how program rules shaped the experience, what they found helpful and limiting about the program, and whether their views had changed over time. Consumers were also asked about their opinions of program effectiveness and satisfaction; suggestions for program improvements were collected. Residents were recruited through posting and mailing fliers. The perspectives of residents who left the program several years ago were included as were the views of those who had difficult residencies. For comparison, opinions of staff members were collected. In total, 43 volunteers were interviewed: 11 current residents, 26 former residents, and 6 staff members. Results suggest that the interaction between program structure and practices as well as resident and staff member's abilities and resources influence meanings assigned to experiences. The program created an atmosphere conducive for change, but the ability of residents to respond played a pivotal role. Some residents quickly partnered with the program, some after time, and a small number did not respond in any significant way. Residents' ability to form trusting relationships with staff members appeared to be the most crucial factor in creating bonds. Residents who connected immediately focused on ways in which they had grown and their lives had changed. Their central tenet was the program's positive impact on their lives. Residents who were slow to connect formed relationships that were dominated by staff members who continued to provide support even when their behavior was destructive and they felt undeserving; the core belief around which they organized their views was that staff members' refusal to abandon them resulted in a gradual increase in feelings of self-worth. The residents who never attached created meanings that were characterized by distance and mistrust; they were driven by conflict and difficulties and focused on separation and individuation from the program.(author abstract)

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