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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Labella, Madelyn H.; McCormick, Christopher M.; Narayan, Angela J.; Desjardins, Christopher D. ; Masten, Ann S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2019

    A multimethod, multi-informant design was used to examine links among sociodemographic risk, family adversity, parenting quality, and child adjustment in families experiencing homelessness. Participants were 245 homeless parents (Mage = 31.0, 63.6% African American) and their 4- to 6-year-old children (48.6% male). Path analyses revealed unique associations by risk domain: Higher sociodemographic risk predicted more externalizing behavior and poorer teacher–child relationships, whereas higher family adversity predicted more internalizing behavior. Parenting quality was positively associated with peer acceptance and buffered effects of family adversity on internalizing symptoms, consistent with a protective effect. Parenting quality was associated with lower externalizing behavior only when sociodemographic risk was below the sample mean. Implications for research and practice are discussed. (author abstract)

    A multimethod, multi-informant design was used to examine links among sociodemographic risk, family adversity, parenting quality, and child adjustment in families experiencing homelessness. Participants were 245 homeless parents (Mage = 31.0, 63.6% African American) and their 4- to 6-year-old children (48.6% male). Path analyses revealed unique associations by risk domain: Higher sociodemographic risk predicted more externalizing behavior and poorer teacher–child relationships, whereas higher family adversity predicted more internalizing behavior. Parenting quality was positively associated with peer acceptance and buffered effects of family adversity on internalizing symptoms, consistent with a protective effect. Parenting quality was associated with lower externalizing behavior only when sociodemographic risk was below the sample mean. Implications for research and practice are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Elliott, Diana; Quakenbush, Caleb
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Washington, DC, is a city of contrasts with respect to residents’ financial security. While some residents are among the country’s most financially secure, others find it hard to make ends meet. High housing costs, unequal opportunity, and economically segregated neighborhoods make it challenging for some residents to feel financially secure and to weather unexpected expenses and emergencies.

    The city has extensive resources to support residents, ranging from policies that protect consumers to city-led programs that assist those in need to deep nonprofit capacity that helps residents improve their financial standing. But even in a city with strong supports for financial health, more can be done. To learn where gaps and opportunities exist in DC’s financial landscape, we spoke with residents about their financial challenges, how they address financial crises, the financial services they like and use most, and what financial service needs are not being met. From this knowledge, better programs can be designed to help residents shore up their financial standing.

    This...

    Washington, DC, is a city of contrasts with respect to residents’ financial security. While some residents are among the country’s most financially secure, others find it hard to make ends meet. High housing costs, unequal opportunity, and economically segregated neighborhoods make it challenging for some residents to feel financially secure and to weather unexpected expenses and emergencies.

    The city has extensive resources to support residents, ranging from policies that protect consumers to city-led programs that assist those in need to deep nonprofit capacity that helps residents improve their financial standing. But even in a city with strong supports for financial health, more can be done. To learn where gaps and opportunities exist in DC’s financial landscape, we spoke with residents about their financial challenges, how they address financial crises, the financial services they like and use most, and what financial service needs are not being met. From this knowledge, better programs can be designed to help residents shore up their financial standing.

    This brief describes the financial landscape for DC residents and the products and services that would help them most. Additionally, this brief is responsive to the city’s concurrent and ongoing policy and program conversations. For one, the DC government is investigating whether a financial empowerment center—where residents can receive financial counseling—may be needed and for whom. For another, nonprofit and government stakeholders have been discussing small-dollar loan gaps, where residents seek emergency funds, and how best to address such needs. This brief is grounded in these conversations and related questions, explored through six focus groups conducted in October and December 2018 with residents accessing financial programs through various DC nonprofit service providers. We conducted additional stakeholder interviews among leaders working within the DC government and at area nonprofits who work with people with notable financial needs of potential interest for financial empowerment center programming. These people include returning citizens, immigrants, those transitioning off Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and those transitioning out of homelessness.

    The findings reveal the financial service needs that programs are not meeting and potential avenues to better help DC residents move toward greater security.

    Key findings include the following:

    • Distrust in financial institutions is prevalent. Most residents in the focus groups were banked. But there was considerable distrust of large financial institutions because of negative experiences with banks and loans. Some residents reported switching banks or credit unions after bad experiences and reported pulling money out of their accounts.
    • Residents struggle to build up savings. Most respondents reported that saving money for emergencies and long-term financial goals was difficult for such reasons as student loan payments, transportation expenses, financial disruptions, unpredictable employment, and consumer debt. Housing costs were frequently cited as the biggest expense and concern.
    • Credit access and understanding is limited. Despite an interest in improving their credit scores, respondents did not necessarily have the correct information or know the best way to achieve this goal. In addition, not all residents have access to revolving credit, and its access is limited in less affluent areas.
    • Small-dollar loans could help. Residents expressed a need for emergency cash assistance. There are few safe and affordable small-dollar loan products in DC, and none provide immediate assistance, so expanding access could help. But residents are concerned about borrowing money and being locked into an inflexible payment cycle and schedule.

    Many residents could be served well by a financial empowerment center. This includes returning citizens, people transitioning off government assistance and housing programs, and immigrants. Financial counseling and coaching, loan products, and programs that target debt management and housing expenses could offer benefits. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Scally, Corianne; Batko, Samantha; Popkin, Susan; DuBois, Nicole
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Recent proposals, including the President’s FY 2018 proposed budget and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s A Better Way plan, propose deep cuts and possible reforms to housing assistance. Currently, only one in five eligible renter households receives federal assistance. Any reductions to funding and the proposed reforms threaten the well-being of millions of households. This report provides an overview of the current landscape of housing assistance, its central role in the safety net, the evidence on contemporary policy proposals, and identifies critical gaps in our knowledge that suggest the need for more investigation prior to policy changes. (Author abstract) 

    Recent proposals, including the President’s FY 2018 proposed budget and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s A Better Way plan, propose deep cuts and possible reforms to housing assistance. Currently, only one in five eligible renter households receives federal assistance. Any reductions to funding and the proposed reforms threaten the well-being of millions of households. This report provides an overview of the current landscape of housing assistance, its central role in the safety net, the evidence on contemporary policy proposals, and identifies critical gaps in our knowledge that suggest the need for more investigation prior to policy changes. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    This set of selections focuses on homeless families and self-sufficiency. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

    This set of selections focuses on homeless families and self-sufficiency. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

  • Individual Author: Pinkett, Randal; Jones, Christopher; Crumel, Kenya ; Dong, Jie; Vandawalker, Melissa; Locke, Gretchen ; Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the...

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the period covered by Phase I of the evaluation solidifying partner roles and responsibilities and developing the systems and procedures needed to accommodate this new and complex approach to providing affordable housing for people with disabilities. The pace of attracting properties and units to the program and leasing units has been slower than HUD and grantees expected for a variety of reasons, such as tight housing market conditions (high-price and low-vacancy), difficulty aligning housing and services, program requirements, and location mismatch. (Author abstract) 

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