Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Edin, Kathryn; Nelson, Timothy J.; Butler, Rachel; Francis, Robert
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2019

    U.S. children are more likely to live apart from a biological parent than at any time in history. Although the Child Support Enforcement system has tremendous reach, its policies have not kept pace with significant economic, demographic, and cultural changes. Narrative analysis of in-depth interviews with 429 low-income noncustodial fathers suggests that the system faces a crisis of legitimacy. Visualization of language used to describe all forms child support show that the formal system is considered punitive and to lead to a loss of power and autonomy. Further, it is not associated with coparenting or the father–child bond—themes closely associated with informal and in-kind support. Rather than stoking men’s identities as providers, the system becomes “just another bill to pay.” Orders must be sustainable, all fathers should have coparenting agreements, and alternative forms of support should count toward fathers’ obligations. Recovery of government welfare costs should be eliminated. (Author abstract)

    U.S. children are more likely to live apart from a biological parent than at any time in history. Although the Child Support Enforcement system has tremendous reach, its policies have not kept pace with significant economic, demographic, and cultural changes. Narrative analysis of in-depth interviews with 429 low-income noncustodial fathers suggests that the system faces a crisis of legitimacy. Visualization of language used to describe all forms child support show that the formal system is considered punitive and to lead to a loss of power and autonomy. Further, it is not associated with coparenting or the father–child bond—themes closely associated with informal and in-kind support. Rather than stoking men’s identities as providers, the system becomes “just another bill to pay.” Orders must be sustainable, all fathers should have coparenting agreements, and alternative forms of support should count toward fathers’ obligations. Recovery of government welfare costs should be eliminated. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kim, Hyunil; Drake, Brett
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Background: Child maltreatment is a pressing social problem in the USA and internationally. There are increasing calls for the use of a public health approach to child maltreatment, but the effective adoption of such an approach requires a sound foundation of epidemiological data. This study estimates for the first time, using national data, total and type-specific official maltreatment risks while simultaneously considering environmental poverty and race/ethnicity. Methods: National official maltreatment data (2009–13) were linked to census data. We used additive mixed models to estimate race/ethnicity-specific rates of official maltreatment (total and subtypes) as a function of county-level child poverty rates. The additive model coupled with the multilevel design provided empirically sound estimates while handling both curvilinearity and the nested data structure. Results: With increasing county child poverty rates, total and type-specific official maltreatment rates increased in all race/ethnicity groups. At similar poverty...

    Background: Child maltreatment is a pressing social problem in the USA and internationally. There are increasing calls for the use of a public health approach to child maltreatment, but the effective adoption of such an approach requires a sound foundation of epidemiological data. This study estimates for the first time, using national data, total and type-specific official maltreatment risks while simultaneously considering environmental poverty and race/ethnicity. Methods: National official maltreatment data (2009–13) were linked to census data. We used additive mixed models to estimate race/ethnicity-specific rates of official maltreatment (total and subtypes) as a function of county-level child poverty rates. The additive model coupled with the multilevel design provided empirically sound estimates while handling both curvilinearity and the nested data structure. Results: With increasing county child poverty rates, total and type-specific official maltreatment rates increased in all race/ethnicity groups. At similar poverty levels, White maltreatment rates trended higher than Blacks and Hispanics showed lower rates, especially where the data were most sufficient. For example, at the 25% poverty level, total maltreatment report rates were 6.91% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.43%–7.40%] for Whites, 6.30% (5.50%–7.11%) for Blacks and 3.32% (2.88%–3.76%) for Hispanics. Conclusions: We find strong positive associations between official child maltreatment and environmental poverty in all race/ethnicity groups. Our data suggest that Black/White disproportionality in official maltreatment is largely driven by Black/White differences in poverty. Our findings also support the presence of a ‘Hispanic paradox’ in official maltreatment, where Hispanics have lower risks compared with similarly economically situated Whites and Blacks. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mattingly, Marybeth J.; Schaefer, Andrew; Gagnon, Douglas J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The mathematics of poverty suggest that family composition changes may influence poverty rates and, in particular, that the addition of a new child increases estimated family expenses and correspondingly the family’s poverty threshold. This analysis of 2015 Current Population Survey data finds that those families more likely to live in poverty—Black and Hispanic families, families with children, less-educated families, and those living in more rural or highly urban environments—are at heightened risk of falling into poverty with an additional child. (Author abstract)

    The mathematics of poverty suggest that family composition changes may influence poverty rates and, in particular, that the addition of a new child increases estimated family expenses and correspondingly the family’s poverty threshold. This analysis of 2015 Current Population Survey data finds that those families more likely to live in poverty—Black and Hispanic families, families with children, less-educated families, and those living in more rural or highly urban environments—are at heightened risk of falling into poverty with an additional child. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Roby, Scott; Stanley, Scott; Johnson, Charisse; Friend, Daniel; Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This session, moderated by Charisse Johnson (Administration for Children and Families), featured findings from the process study of the Strengthening Relationship Education and Marriage Services (STREAMS) evaluation of two Healthy Marriage-Relationship Education (HMRE) programs: Career STREAMS in St. Louis, MO and MotherWise, in Denver, CO. After the presentations, Scott Roby (Public Strategies), a technical assistance provider and trainer on HMRE curricula, and Scott Stanley (University of Denver), a research professor and HMRE curriculum developer, responded to the study findings. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This session, moderated by Charisse Johnson (Administration for Children and Families), featured findings from the process study of the Strengthening Relationship Education and Marriage Services (STREAMS) evaluation of two Healthy Marriage-Relationship Education (HMRE) programs: Career STREAMS in St. Louis, MO and MotherWise, in Denver, CO. After the presentations, Scott Roby (Public Strategies), a technical assistance provider and trainer on HMRE curricula, and Scott Stanley (University of Denver), a research professor and HMRE curriculum developer, responded to the study findings. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Davis, Alexandra N.; Streit, Cara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    The current study aimed to examine themes surrounding the moral identity of adolescents from two low-income communities in the United States using qualitative interviews. Based on previous conceptual models, the authors aimed to examine the co-occurrence of themes of morality, stressors, and family processes. Participants were adolescents from the Northeast and Midwest (n = 38; mean age = 15.64; 73.7% female; 23.7% Black, 30.6% Latino, and 47.4% White). The results demonstrated that morality was a salient theme among adolescents. In addition, a subset of adolescents discussed stressors and family processes in conjunction with morality. The discussion will focus on the resiliency of youth living in low-income communities. (Author abstract)

     

    The current study aimed to examine themes surrounding the moral identity of adolescents from two low-income communities in the United States using qualitative interviews. Based on previous conceptual models, the authors aimed to examine the co-occurrence of themes of morality, stressors, and family processes. Participants were adolescents from the Northeast and Midwest (n = 38; mean age = 15.64; 73.7% female; 23.7% Black, 30.6% Latino, and 47.4% White). The results demonstrated that morality was a salient theme among adolescents. In addition, a subset of adolescents discussed stressors and family processes in conjunction with morality. The discussion will focus on the resiliency of youth living in low-income communities. (Author abstract)

     

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1998 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations