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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Edin, Kathryn; Nelson, Timothy J.; Butler, Rachel; Francis, Robert
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2019

    U.S. children are more likely to live apart from a biological parent than at any time in history. Although the Child Support Enforcement system has tremendous reach, its policies have not kept pace with significant economic, demographic, and cultural changes. Narrative analysis of in-depth interviews with 429 low-income noncustodial fathers suggests that the system faces a crisis of legitimacy. Visualization of language used to describe all forms child support show that the formal system is considered punitive and to lead to a loss of power and autonomy. Further, it is not associated with coparenting or the father–child bond—themes closely associated with informal and in-kind support. Rather than stoking men’s identities as providers, the system becomes “just another bill to pay.” Orders must be sustainable, all fathers should have coparenting agreements, and alternative forms of support should count toward fathers’ obligations. Recovery of government welfare costs should be eliminated. (Author abstract)

    U.S. children are more likely to live apart from a biological parent than at any time in history. Although the Child Support Enforcement system has tremendous reach, its policies have not kept pace with significant economic, demographic, and cultural changes. Narrative analysis of in-depth interviews with 429 low-income noncustodial fathers suggests that the system faces a crisis of legitimacy. Visualization of language used to describe all forms child support show that the formal system is considered punitive and to lead to a loss of power and autonomy. Further, it is not associated with coparenting or the father–child bond—themes closely associated with informal and in-kind support. Rather than stoking men’s identities as providers, the system becomes “just another bill to pay.” Orders must be sustainable, all fathers should have coparenting agreements, and alternative forms of support should count toward fathers’ obligations. Recovery of government welfare costs should be eliminated. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Koohi-Kamali, Feridoon; Liu, Ran
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2017

    The combined influence of gender and race has been a defining feature of poverty in the USA, especially for single mothers. Recent applications of capability-based multidimensional poverty (MP) measurement to US data have examined race and gender, but little attention has been given to the intersection of the two. We address this gap in the literature on multidimensional poverty by employing household-level US Census data for the years 2006–2010 that are from Pennsylvania, a state with key income poverty indicators close to the mid-poverty values for all fifty states. We employ a dual cut-off procedure to present MP measures by levels of population sub-groups. The poverty ranking by single motherhood shows Hispanics are the most deprived, Whites as the least deprived, and African–Americans coming in between. Our findings suggest that the provision of child care facilities can prove effective for poverty reduction; and the improvement of language skills is likely to be critical for Hispanics. (Author abstract)

    The combined influence of gender and race has been a defining feature of poverty in the USA, especially for single mothers. Recent applications of capability-based multidimensional poverty (MP) measurement to US data have examined race and gender, but little attention has been given to the intersection of the two. We address this gap in the literature on multidimensional poverty by employing household-level US Census data for the years 2006–2010 that are from Pennsylvania, a state with key income poverty indicators close to the mid-poverty values for all fifty states. We employ a dual cut-off procedure to present MP measures by levels of population sub-groups. The poverty ranking by single motherhood shows Hispanics are the most deprived, Whites as the least deprived, and African–Americans coming in between. Our findings suggest that the provision of child care facilities can prove effective for poverty reduction; and the improvement of language skills is likely to be critical for Hispanics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moffett, Erin
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2016

    Childhood obesity is a serious crisis in the United States and is disproportionately affecting minorities. Compared to only 28.5% of white adolescents, 38.9% of Hispanic adolescents are overweight or obese indicating a need for immediate action. As parents are the primary decision makers of their children’s dietary intakes, it is necessary to understand what food choices parents are making for themselves and their children and what factors are influencing this relationship. As part of a larger cross-sectional study, this investigation aimed to understand the dietary intakes of 31 Hispanic mother-child dyads in Southern Chester County Pennsylvania. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were used to measure dietary intakes among the population and bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods were used to assess the relationship between mother and child diet. The dietary intakes and mother-child diet similarity were then examined with respect to acculturation, food security, and participation in food assistance programs. Consistent with previous findings, Hispanic children and...

    Childhood obesity is a serious crisis in the United States and is disproportionately affecting minorities. Compared to only 28.5% of white adolescents, 38.9% of Hispanic adolescents are overweight or obese indicating a need for immediate action. As parents are the primary decision makers of their children’s dietary intakes, it is necessary to understand what food choices parents are making for themselves and their children and what factors are influencing this relationship. As part of a larger cross-sectional study, this investigation aimed to understand the dietary intakes of 31 Hispanic mother-child dyads in Southern Chester County Pennsylvania. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were used to measure dietary intakes among the population and bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods were used to assess the relationship between mother and child diet. The dietary intakes and mother-child diet similarity were then examined with respect to acculturation, food security, and participation in food assistance programs. Consistent with previous findings, Hispanic children and women were not meeting most recommended dietary intakes and are experiencing high rates of overweight and obesity, with 42% of children and 81% of mothers in this sample classified as overweight or obese. Overall, our study found that the diets of the mothers had minimal modeling effects on the diets of their children (majority of p > 0.05), and that the diets of the children were mainly constrained by food availability. Future interventions should focus on increasing access and availability of healthy foods to low income and immigrant families. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bird, Kisha; Okoh, Clarence
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Employment is an important part of youth development and the successful progression into young adulthood. Young people learn important communication and social skills, and are also exposed to careers, workplace culture, and opportunities to hone problem-solving and interpersonal skills. Research reinforces the importance of early work experience, especially for poor and low-income youth. Youth employment strategies, including summer jobs, paid internships, and year-round subsidized work experiences, can be linked to a broader approach to address poverty. Children who are born poor—and are persistently poor—are significantly more likely than those not poor at birth to experience poverty in adulthood, unemployment, and underemployment. Persistent childhood poverty (living below the federal poverty level for at least half of one’s childhood) is prevalent among Black children. To lift children—particularly children and youth of color—out of poverty, they must have access to work and a career path leading into adulthood. Beyond eventual economic security and social mobility, there are...

    Employment is an important part of youth development and the successful progression into young adulthood. Young people learn important communication and social skills, and are also exposed to careers, workplace culture, and opportunities to hone problem-solving and interpersonal skills. Research reinforces the importance of early work experience, especially for poor and low-income youth. Youth employment strategies, including summer jobs, paid internships, and year-round subsidized work experiences, can be linked to a broader approach to address poverty. Children who are born poor—and are persistently poor—are significantly more likely than those not poor at birth to experience poverty in adulthood, unemployment, and underemployment. Persistent childhood poverty (living below the federal poverty level for at least half of one’s childhood) is prevalent among Black children. To lift children—particularly children and youth of color—out of poverty, they must have access to work and a career path leading into adulthood. Beyond eventual economic security and social mobility, there are many short and long-term benefits to youth employment. Employed teens are more likely to graduate high school, and recent research studies suggest that employment during the summer months can prevent involvement in the juvenile and criminal justice systems. Moreover, employment in the teen years is a significant predictor of successful attachment to the labor market into adulthood. It is also linked to increased earnings in the short-term and later in life. In fact, older youth have almost a 100% chance of being employed in a given year if they have worked more than 40 weeks in the previous year. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Romero, Lisa M.; Middleton, Dawn; Mueller, Trisha; Avellino, Lia; Hallum-Montes, Rachel
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Purpose: The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement.

    Methods: Health center partner baseline data were collected in the first year (2011) and before program implementation of a 5-year community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative. A needs assessment on health center capacity and implementation of evidence-based clinical practices was administered with 51 health centers partners in 10 communities in the United States with high rates of teen pregnancy.

    Results: Health centers reported inconsistent implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in providing reproductive health services to adolescents. Approximately 94.1% offered same-day appointments, 91.1% had infrastructure to reduce cost barriers, 90.2% offered after-school appointments, and 80.4% prescribed hormonal contraception...

    Purpose: The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement.

    Methods: Health center partner baseline data were collected in the first year (2011) and before program implementation of a 5-year community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative. A needs assessment on health center capacity and implementation of evidence-based clinical practices was administered with 51 health centers partners in 10 communities in the United States with high rates of teen pregnancy.

    Results: Health centers reported inconsistent implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in providing reproductive health services to adolescents. Approximately 94.1% offered same-day appointments, 91.1% had infrastructure to reduce cost barriers, 90.2% offered after-school appointments, and 80.4% prescribed hormonal contraception without prerequisite examinations or testing. Approximately three quarters provided visual and audio privacy in examination rooms (76.5%) and counseling areas (74.5%). Fewer offered a wide range of contraceptive methods (67.8%) and took a sexual health history at every visit (54.9%). Only 45.1% reported Quick Start initiation of hormonal contraception, emergency contraception (43.1%), or intrauterine devices (12.5%) were “always” available to adolescents.

    Conclusions: The assessment highlighted opportunities for health center improvement. Strategies to build capacity of health center partners to implement evidence-based clinical practices may lead to accessibility and quality of reproductive health services for adolescents in the funded communities. (Author abstract)

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