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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Denny-Brown, Noelle; Livermore, Gina; Shenk, Marisa; Morris, Eric
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in...

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in the pilot project spend their time across various Pathways and non-Pathways activities. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Forber-Pratt, Anjali J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    The present study examined the views of students with varying physical disabilities on disability culture in a post-Americans with Disability Act society. Qualitative, participatory research methods were used to observe approximately 30 disabled students and conduct in-depth interviews with four disabled students. The main objective was initially to answer the following question: Do disabled students recognize an identifiable disability culture at that particular university, and if so, what does it look like? While the sheer presence of disabled students does not automatically equate to a robust disability culture, it became apparent that there was a disability culture at this site, and therefore the research question was refined to: What are the features of disability culture according to this population? The participants were all students at an institute of higher education in the Midwestern United States. The researcher self-identifies as having a disability. Using in vivo coding for analysis to preserve the voices of the participants themselves, the results indicated that...

    The present study examined the views of students with varying physical disabilities on disability culture in a post-Americans with Disability Act society. Qualitative, participatory research methods were used to observe approximately 30 disabled students and conduct in-depth interviews with four disabled students. The main objective was initially to answer the following question: Do disabled students recognize an identifiable disability culture at that particular university, and if so, what does it look like? While the sheer presence of disabled students does not automatically equate to a robust disability culture, it became apparent that there was a disability culture at this site, and therefore the research question was refined to: What are the features of disability culture according to this population? The participants were all students at an institute of higher education in the Midwestern United States. The researcher self-identifies as having a disability. Using in vivo coding for analysis to preserve the voices of the participants themselves, the results indicated that there was a disability culture and the key values defining this culture included independence, social justice, and giving back to others. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Salisbury, Sarah
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the important role that transportation plays, the goals of achieving full community integration, and the challenges with transportation in the current environment.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the important role that transportation plays, the goals of achieving full community integration, and the challenges with transportation in the current environment.

  • Individual Author: Poe-Yamagata, Eileen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This presentation was given during the 2017 NAWRS conference. Topics include determining if American Job Centers (AJCs) are accessible to people with disabilities, how accessibility varies across three domains (physical, communication, and programmatic), and how accessibility varies by characteristics of the AJCs. 

    This presentation was given during the 2017 NAWRS conference. Topics include determining if American Job Centers (AJCs) are accessible to people with disabilities, how accessibility varies across three domains (physical, communication, and programmatic), and how accessibility varies by characteristics of the AJCs. 

  • Individual Author: Miller, Rachel; Sevak, Purvi; Honeycutt, Todd
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief illustrates how state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies can use performance management tools and processes to leverage their data systems to improve their programs. VR agencies play an important role in delivering services to transition-aged youth with disabilities who are preparing to move into employment or postsecondary education. VR agencies collect, or can obtain, large amounts of data on client services and outcomes—data that can go largely underutilized. As agencies try to improve outcomes for youth clients, performance management tools can use these data to track existing outcomes and can inform program and policy changes to serve clients better. These tools are especially important, given the emphasis on performance measurement and evidence-based best practices by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and organizations like the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition. (Author abstract) 

    This brief illustrates how state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies can use performance management tools and processes to leverage their data systems to improve their programs. VR agencies play an important role in delivering services to transition-aged youth with disabilities who are preparing to move into employment or postsecondary education. VR agencies collect, or can obtain, large amounts of data on client services and outcomes—data that can go largely underutilized. As agencies try to improve outcomes for youth clients, performance management tools can use these data to track existing outcomes and can inform program and policy changes to serve clients better. These tools are especially important, given the emphasis on performance measurement and evidence-based best practices by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and organizations like the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition. (Author abstract) 

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