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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Kalil, Ariel
    Reference Type: Conference Paper, Report
    Year: 2017

    This article presents a brief overview of gaps by family income in some important child development outcomes. I argue that a big part of the mechanism in linking poverty to child development outcomes works through differences by family background in parenting, and I review efforts to narrow gaps in how parents interact with their children by family income. Finally, I describe my current research project, which draws on behavioral economics for insight into how parents make decisions about investing time with their children, how that process might differ by family background, and what promise those findings might hold for intervention efforts. (author introduction)

    This article presents a brief overview of gaps by family income in some important child development outcomes. I argue that a big part of the mechanism in linking poverty to child development outcomes works through differences by family background in parenting, and I review efforts to narrow gaps in how parents interact with their children by family income. Finally, I describe my current research project, which draws on behavioral economics for insight into how parents make decisions about investing time with their children, how that process might differ by family background, and what promise those findings might hold for intervention efforts. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ludwig, Rebekah
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    The American family has changed dramatically over the past half century, increasing in instability, diversity, and complexity. More people are having children outside of marriage , some with partners and others as single parents; more unmarried couples are living together; up to half of couples that do marry, divorce; and many couples with children that break up go on to have more children with new partners…

    These changes in couples’ relationships and childbearing, which have led to unprecedented family complexity, have been accompanied by a steep increase in U.S. economic inequality over the last quarter of the 20th century.

    Researchers have found growing gaps in children’s experiences by their parents’ socioeconomic status. The differences in family structure are thought to also affect increasing inequality, and vice versa. (author introduction)

    The American family has changed dramatically over the past half century, increasing in instability, diversity, and complexity. More people are having children outside of marriage , some with partners and others as single parents; more unmarried couples are living together; up to half of couples that do marry, divorce; and many couples with children that break up go on to have more children with new partners…

    These changes in couples’ relationships and childbearing, which have led to unprecedented family complexity, have been accompanied by a steep increase in U.S. economic inequality over the last quarter of the 20th century.

    Researchers have found growing gaps in children’s experiences by their parents’ socioeconomic status. The differences in family structure are thought to also affect increasing inequality, and vice versa. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Watson, Tara; Sheppard, Lara Shore; Schmidt, Lucie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Does the safety net reduce food insecurity in families? In this paper we investigate how the structure of benefits for five major safety net programs – TANF, SSI, EITC, SNAP, and Medicaid – affects low food security in families and very low food security among children. We build a calculator for the years 2001-2009 to impute eligibility and benefits for these programs in each state, taking into account cross-program eligibility rules. To identify a causal effect of the safety net, we instrument for imputed eligibility and benefits using simulated eligibility and benefits for a nationally representative sample. Focusing on non-immigrant, single-parent families with incomes below 300 percent of the poverty line, the results suggest that the median annual cash and food package of roughly $3400 reduces low food security by 5.1 percentage points on a base incidence of 33 percent, a 16 percent reduction. The same package reduces the more extreme outcome of childhood very low food security by an imprecisely estimated 36 percent. Controlling for receipt of other program benefits, the...

    Does the safety net reduce food insecurity in families? In this paper we investigate how the structure of benefits for five major safety net programs – TANF, SSI, EITC, SNAP, and Medicaid – affects low food security in families and very low food security among children. We build a calculator for the years 2001-2009 to impute eligibility and benefits for these programs in each state, taking into account cross-program eligibility rules. To identify a causal effect of the safety net, we instrument for imputed eligibility and benefits using simulated eligibility and benefits for a nationally representative sample. Focusing on non-immigrant, single-parent families with incomes below 300 percent of the poverty line, the results suggest that the median annual cash and food package of roughly $3400 reduces low food security by 5.1 percentage points on a base incidence of 33 percent, a 16 percent reduction. The same package reduces the more extreme outcome of childhood very low food security by an imprecisely estimated 36 percent. Controlling for receipt of other program benefits, the SNAP food assistance program improves food security: each $1000 in annual SNAP eligibility reduces low food security by 1.8 percentage points. We are unable to reject equivalent impacts of cash and food assistance. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bratter, Jenifer; Damaske, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Capturing the conditions of children of color living in single-parent families has become more complex due to the growing presence of interracial households. This analysis assesses the size and poverty status of single-female headed families housing multiracial children. Using data from the 2000 Census, we find that 9 percent of female-headed families house either children who are classified with more than one race or are classified as a single race different than their mother’s compared to only 3 percent of married couple families. Logistic regression analyses assessing the odds of poverty status for families finds that being a multiracial family does not constitute a uniform advantage or disadvantage for female headed households. Rather, these families, like most families of color, are more likely to experience poverty than white monoracial families. The two exceptions are White multiracial families who are more likely to be in poverty relative to this reference group and Asian multiracial families who have similar poverty rates as white monoracial families (and a lower rate...

    Capturing the conditions of children of color living in single-parent families has become more complex due to the growing presence of interracial households. This analysis assesses the size and poverty status of single-female headed families housing multiracial children. Using data from the 2000 Census, we find that 9 percent of female-headed families house either children who are classified with more than one race or are classified as a single race different than their mother’s compared to only 3 percent of married couple families. Logistic regression analyses assessing the odds of poverty status for families finds that being a multiracial family does not constitute a uniform advantage or disadvantage for female headed households. Rather, these families, like most families of color, are more likely to experience poverty than white monoracial families. The two exceptions are White multiracial families who are more likely to be in poverty relative to this reference group and Asian multiracial families who have similar poverty rates as white monoracial families (and a lower rate than Asian monoracial families). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chau, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    After nearly a decade of decline, the number of children living in low-income families has increased significantly since 2000. This data book provides national and 50-state trend data on the characteristics of low-income children over the past decade: parental education, parental employment, marital status, family structure, race and ethnicity, age distribution, parental nativity, home ownership, residential mobility, type of residential area, and region of residence. The most current year of data can also be accessed at www.nccp.org—see NCCP’s 50-State Demographic Profiles or build custom tables using NCCP’s 50-State Demographics Wizard. For a discussion of these data and selected policy implications, see NCCP’s fact sheets on low-income children, which are updated annually. (Author introduction)

    After nearly a decade of decline, the number of children living in low-income families has increased significantly since 2000. This data book provides national and 50-state trend data on the characteristics of low-income children over the past decade: parental education, parental employment, marital status, family structure, race and ethnicity, age distribution, parental nativity, home ownership, residential mobility, type of residential area, and region of residence. The most current year of data can also be accessed at www.nccp.org—see NCCP’s 50-State Demographic Profiles or build custom tables using NCCP’s 50-State Demographics Wizard. For a discussion of these data and selected policy implications, see NCCP’s fact sheets on low-income children, which are updated annually. (Author introduction)

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