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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Montgomery O'Keefe, Siobhan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Incarceration in the United States has a serious impact on families and on children. Incarcerated adults have children at nearly the same rates as the non-incarcerated population, and children living in families with an incarcerated parent are more likely to experience certain hardships. (Edited author introduction)

    Incarceration in the United States has a serious impact on families and on children. Incarcerated adults have children at nearly the same rates as the non-incarcerated population, and children living in families with an incarcerated parent are more likely to experience certain hardships. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Child maltreatment happens in all kinds of families, but low income is the most consistent predictor. This holds true in the United States and many other nations and the correlation is substantiated by decades of research. But new research goes beyond association to reveal a causal relationship between poverty and child maltreatment. A set of studies published in the journal Children and Youth Services Review shows that poverty exists as both a cause and consequence of child abuse and neglect. Just as child maltreatment is most prevalent in poor families, mistreated children often struggle to achieve economic success as adults. This brief describes the latest statistics on child maltreatment as reported to child protective services (CPS) agencies and goes on to highlight related findings from a limited selection of the studies included in the journal. (Author abstract)

    Child maltreatment happens in all kinds of families, but low income is the most consistent predictor. This holds true in the United States and many other nations and the correlation is substantiated by decades of research. But new research goes beyond association to reveal a causal relationship between poverty and child maltreatment. A set of studies published in the journal Children and Youth Services Review shows that poverty exists as both a cause and consequence of child abuse and neglect. Just as child maltreatment is most prevalent in poor families, mistreated children often struggle to achieve economic success as adults. This brief describes the latest statistics on child maltreatment as reported to child protective services (CPS) agencies and goes on to highlight related findings from a limited selection of the studies included in the journal. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rynell, Amy; Tuttle, Samantha; Buitrago, Katie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Chicago is currently facing a devastating surge in lethal violence in addition to staggering rates of poverty across Illinois. Policymakers and community leaders are struggling with finding short- and long-term solutions to stem the violence and allow neighborhoods to heal. In the meantime, communities are fearing for their own safety and grieving over lost parents, children, friends, and leaders every day. The stakes forgetting the solutions right could not be higher. Poverty and violence often intersect, feed one another, and share root causes. Neighborhoods with high levels of violence are also characterized by high levels of poverty, lack of adequate public services and educational opportunity, poorer health outcomes, asset and income inequality, and more. The underlying socioeconomic conditions in these neighborhoods perpetuate both violence and poverty. Furthermore, trauma can result from both violence and poverty. Unaddressed trauma worsens quality of life, makes it hard to rise out of poverty by posing barriers to success at school and work, and raises the likelihood of...

    Chicago is currently facing a devastating surge in lethal violence in addition to staggering rates of poverty across Illinois. Policymakers and community leaders are struggling with finding short- and long-term solutions to stem the violence and allow neighborhoods to heal. In the meantime, communities are fearing for their own safety and grieving over lost parents, children, friends, and leaders every day. The stakes forgetting the solutions right could not be higher. Poverty and violence often intersect, feed one another, and share root causes. Neighborhoods with high levels of violence are also characterized by high levels of poverty, lack of adequate public services and educational opportunity, poorer health outcomes, asset and income inequality, and more. The underlying socioeconomic conditions in these neighborhoods perpetuate both violence and poverty. Furthermore, trauma can result from both violence and poverty. Unaddressed trauma worsens quality of life, makes it hard to rise out of poverty by posing barriers to success at school and work, and raises the likelihood of aggressive behavior. In this way, untreated trauma—coupled with easy gun availability and other factors—feeds the cycle of poverty and violence. (Author desription)

  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; Magnuson, Katherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Early childhood is an important, but contested, topic of research related to the production of human capital, and the only period of childhood and adolescence with relatively little public investment. Some scholars interpret the early childhood intervention evidence as showing promising opportunities for addressing inequities in human capital, and consequently argue for significant expansion of public investment. Other scholars come to more cautious or even negative conclusions, worrying particularly about the degree of risk and uncertainty in current evidence regarding longterm payoffs to early childhood investments. In this article, we review the evidence on the potential of early childhood investments, particularly center-based early childhood education, to reduce economic inequality. (author introduction)

    Early childhood is an important, but contested, topic of research related to the production of human capital, and the only period of childhood and adolescence with relatively little public investment. Some scholars interpret the early childhood intervention evidence as showing promising opportunities for addressing inequities in human capital, and consequently argue for significant expansion of public investment. Other scholars come to more cautious or even negative conclusions, worrying particularly about the degree of risk and uncertainty in current evidence regarding longterm payoffs to early childhood investments. In this article, we review the evidence on the potential of early childhood investments, particularly center-based early childhood education, to reduce economic inequality. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Damron, Neil
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of sources, especially work by IRP affiliates and Professors Barbara Wolfe (Economics, Public Affairs, and Population Health Sciences), Seth Pollak (Psychology, Anthropology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Public Affairs), and Katherine Magnuson (Social Work), who provided guidance and content review. (Author abstract)

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of sources, especially work by IRP affiliates and Professors Barbara Wolfe (Economics, Public Affairs, and Population Health Sciences), Seth Pollak (Psychology, Anthropology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Public Affairs), and Katherine Magnuson (Social Work), who provided guidance and content review. (Author abstract)

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