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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Radel, Laura; Baldwin, Melinda; Crouse, Gilbert; Ghertner, Robin; Waters, Annette
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Shattuck, Rachel M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

  • Individual Author: Markham, Christine M.; Rushing, Stephanie C.; Jessen, Cornelia; Gorman, Gwenda; Torres, Jennifer; Lambert, William E.; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; Miller, Leslie; Allums-Featherston, Kelly; Addy, Robert C.; Peskin, Melissa F.; Shegog, Ross
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Background: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth face multiple health challenges compared to other racial/ethnic groups, which could potentially be ameliorated by the dissemination of evidence-based adolescent health promotion programs. Previous studies have indicated that limited trained personnel, cultural barriers, and geographic isolation may hinder the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs among AI/AN youth. Although Internet access is variable in AI/AN communities across the United States, it is swiftly and steadily improving, and it may provide a viable strategy to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs to this underserved population.

    Objective: We explored the potential of using the Internet to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs on multiple health topics to AI/AN youth living in diverse communities across 3 geographically dispersed regions of the United States. Specifically, we assessed the Internet's potential to increase the reach and implementation of...

    Background: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth face multiple health challenges compared to other racial/ethnic groups, which could potentially be ameliorated by the dissemination of evidence-based adolescent health promotion programs. Previous studies have indicated that limited trained personnel, cultural barriers, and geographic isolation may hinder the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs among AI/AN youth. Although Internet access is variable in AI/AN communities across the United States, it is swiftly and steadily improving, and it may provide a viable strategy to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs to this underserved population.

    Objective: We explored the potential of using the Internet to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs on multiple health topics to AI/AN youth living in diverse communities across 3 geographically dispersed regions of the United States. Specifically, we assessed the Internet's potential to increase the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs for AI/AN youth, and to engage AI/AN youth.

    Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 25 participating sites in Alaska, Arizona, and the Pacific Northwest. Predominantly AI/AN youth, aged 12-14 years, accessed 6 evidence-based health promotion programs delivered via the Internet, which focused on sexual health, hearing loss, alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use, and nutrition and physical activity. Adult site coordinators completed computer-based education inventory surveys, connectivity and bandwidth testing to assess parameters related to program reach (computer access, connectivity, and bandwidth), and implementation logs to assess barriers to implementation (program errors and delivery issues). We assessed youths' perceptions of program engagement via ratings on ease of use, understandability, credibility, likeability, perceived impact, and motivational appeal, using previously established measures.

    Results: Sites had sufficient computer access and Internet connectivity to implement the 6 programs with adequate fidelity; however, variable bandwidth (ranging from 0.24 to 93.5 megabits per second; mean 25.6) and technical issues led some sites to access programs via back-up modalities (eg, uploading the programs from a Universal Serial Bus drive). The number of youth providing engagement ratings varied by program (n=40-191; 48-60% female, 85-90% self-identified AI/AN). Across programs, youth rated the programs as easy to use (68-91%), trustworthy (61-89%), likeable (59-87%), and impactful (63-91%). Most youth understood the words in the programs (60-83%), although some needed hints to complete the programs (16-49%). Overall, 37-66% of the participants would recommend the programs to a classmate, and 62-87% found the programs enjoyable when compared to other school lessons.

    Conclusions: Findings demonstrate the potential of the Internet to enhance the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs, and to engage AI/AN youth. Provision of back-up modalities is recommended to address possible connectivity or technical issues. The dissemination of Internet-based health promotion programs may be a promising strategy to address health disparities for this underserved population. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Person, Ann E. ; Clary, Elizabeth; Zief, Susan; Adamek, Katie; Caplan, Valerie; Worthington, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report is the first systematic description of the Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) grant program’s efforts to support expectant and parenting youth. It examines early grant implementation among the 17 states and Indian tribes awarded PAF grants in 2013. The study team gathered and analyzed data from two sources: (1) a standardized review of grant applications, and (2) telephone interviews with administrators representing the 17 grantees. Drawing upon systematic analysis of both data sources, this report describes how grantees developed their strategic approaches and the contextual factors that influenced their decisions. It examines how grantees’ design choices address the wide-ranging needs of expectant and parenting youth and how grantees’ administrative structures support program implementation. It also provides a set of profiles summarizing each grantee’s specific program approach. (Author abstract)

     

    This report is the first systematic description of the Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) grant program’s efforts to support expectant and parenting youth. It examines early grant implementation among the 17 states and Indian tribes awarded PAF grants in 2013. The study team gathered and analyzed data from two sources: (1) a standardized review of grant applications, and (2) telephone interviews with administrators representing the 17 grantees. Drawing upon systematic analysis of both data sources, this report describes how grantees developed their strategic approaches and the contextual factors that influenced their decisions. It examines how grantees’ design choices address the wide-ranging needs of expectant and parenting youth and how grantees’ administrative structures support program implementation. It also provides a set of profiles summarizing each grantee’s specific program approach. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Pakulak, Eric; Bell, Theodore A.; Giuliano, Ryan; Gomsrud, Melissa; Karns, Christina; Klein, Scott; Longoria, Zayra; O'Neill, Lauren; Neville, Helen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    ...Guided by evidence of the neuroplasticity of systems supporting stress regulation, selective attention, and self-regulation, as well as by evidence from successful parenting programs (e.g., Reid et al., 1999), we developed a two-generation intervention that targets attention and self-regulation in preschool children by engaging the broader context of parents and the home environment. The child component of the curriculum is delivered in the classroom, and the parent component is offered in eight weekly two-hour meetings midway through the school year. Child and parent training programs are integrated via an overarching emphasis on child attention, self-regulation, and emotional regulation and via explicit links in the parent program to child learning activities. We have shown that, relative to two comparison groups, parents in the program demonstrate reduced parenting stress, and children in the program display significant improvements in cognition, parent-reported child behaviors, and brain functions supporting selective attention (Neville et al., 2013).

    Our current...

    ...Guided by evidence of the neuroplasticity of systems supporting stress regulation, selective attention, and self-regulation, as well as by evidence from successful parenting programs (e.g., Reid et al., 1999), we developed a two-generation intervention that targets attention and self-regulation in preschool children by engaging the broader context of parents and the home environment. The child component of the curriculum is delivered in the classroom, and the parent component is offered in eight weekly two-hour meetings midway through the school year. Child and parent training programs are integrated via an overarching emphasis on child attention, self-regulation, and emotional regulation and via explicit links in the parent program to child learning activities. We have shown that, relative to two comparison groups, parents in the program demonstrate reduced parenting stress, and children in the program display significant improvements in cognition, parent-reported child behaviors, and brain functions supporting selective attention (Neville et al., 2013).

    Our current project builds on a ten-year program-research partnership with Head Start of Lane County, Oregon. As part of the study, children in 20 classrooms across seven sites are randomly assigned to receive either the two-generation intervention, Creating Connections (CC), or Head Start-as-usual, enabling us to test the hypothesis that children and parents receiving CC will show improvements in in stress physiology, brain functions for attention, and self-regulation. This paper describes preliminary findings based on the first cohort of CC participants (N = 48). We measure stress physiology and brain function for attention and self-regulation in both children and parents before and after implementation of the parent component, in addition to longer-term measures of broader outcomes. Because stress and self-regulation are related to multiple outcomes, we hypothesize that short-term changes in these systems will lead to broader, longer-term improvements in family well-being (e.g., Shonkoff, 2012). Results supporting this hypothesis would provide evidence that investments in two-generation interventions that target self-regulation in children and parents from lower SES backgrounds may produce benefits that extend beyond improvements in school readiness. (author abstract)

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