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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Burd-Sharps, Sarah; Lewis, Kristen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In 2016, the number of young people disconnected from both work and school declined for the sixth year in a row. The 2016 disconnected youth rate of 11.7 percent represents a 20 percent decrease since 2010, when disconnection peaked in the aftermath of the Great Recession—about 1.2 million fewer young people. A large group of young people saw their opportunities expand alongside the expanding economy; the youth unemployment rate was roughly half in 2016 what it was in 2010. But not all young people saw growth: 4.6 million young women and men remain disconnected from both school and the labor market, unmoored from routines of work and school that give shape, purpose, and direction to one’s days, and deprived of experiences that build knowledge, networks, skills, and confidence.

    More than a Million Reasons for Hope: Youth Disconnection in America Today analyzes youth disconnection in the United States by state, metro area, county, and community type, and by gender, race, and ethnicity. Disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, are teenagers and young...

    In 2016, the number of young people disconnected from both work and school declined for the sixth year in a row. The 2016 disconnected youth rate of 11.7 percent represents a 20 percent decrease since 2010, when disconnection peaked in the aftermath of the Great Recession—about 1.2 million fewer young people. A large group of young people saw their opportunities expand alongside the expanding economy; the youth unemployment rate was roughly half in 2016 what it was in 2010. But not all young people saw growth: 4.6 million young women and men remain disconnected from both school and the labor market, unmoored from routines of work and school that give shape, purpose, and direction to one’s days, and deprived of experiences that build knowledge, networks, skills, and confidence.

    More than a Million Reasons for Hope: Youth Disconnection in America Today analyzes youth disconnection in the United States by state, metro area, county, and community type, and by gender, race, and ethnicity. Disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. This report is the first in Measure of America’s disconnected youth series to compare American and European metro areas or to examine disconnection by group characteristics such as poverty status, motherhood, marriage status, disability, English proficiency, citizenship, educational attainment, institutionalization, and household composition for different racial and ethnic groups. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Carson, Jessica A.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.; Schaefer, Andrew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    In 2015, for the second year in a row, child poverty rates declined in the United States. However, familiar patterns in levels and characteristics of child poverty persist: more than one in five children are poor; children of color are at disproportionate risk for poverty; and rates are highest in the South and West and in rural areas and cities (Table 1). This brief uses data from the American Community Survey to investigate patterns of child poverty across race-ethnicities and across regions and place types. We also explore changes in child poverty rates since 2014 and since the end of the Great Recession in 2009. The estimates presented in this brief are based on the official poverty measure (see Box 1 on page 3). Native Americans, Alaskan and Hawaiian natives, and those reporting multiple racial-ethnic backgrounds are excluded from this update because such samples are too small for meaningful analyses. (Author abstract)

    In 2015, for the second year in a row, child poverty rates declined in the United States. However, familiar patterns in levels and characteristics of child poverty persist: more than one in five children are poor; children of color are at disproportionate risk for poverty; and rates are highest in the South and West and in rural areas and cities (Table 1). This brief uses data from the American Community Survey to investigate patterns of child poverty across race-ethnicities and across regions and place types. We also explore changes in child poverty rates since 2014 and since the end of the Great Recession in 2009. The estimates presented in this brief are based on the official poverty measure (see Box 1 on page 3). Native Americans, Alaskan and Hawaiian natives, and those reporting multiple racial-ethnic backgrounds are excluded from this update because such samples are too small for meaningful analyses. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Caldwell, Julia T.; Ford, Chandra L.; Wallace, Steven P.; Wang, May C.; Takahashi, Lois M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    This study examined the relationship between racial/ethnic residential segregation and access to health care in rural areas. Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were merged with the American Community Survey and the Area Health Resources Files. Segregation was operationalized using the isolation index separately for African Americans and Hispanics. Multilevel logistic regression with random intercepts estimated four outcomes. In rural areas, segregation contributed to worse access to a usual source of health care but higher reports of health care needs being met among African Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]: 1.42, CI: 0.96-2.10) and Hispanics (AOR: 1.25, CI: 1.05-1.49). By broadening the spatial scale of segregation beyond urban areas, findings showed the complex interaction between social and spatial factors in rural areas. (Author abstract)

    This study examined the relationship between racial/ethnic residential segregation and access to health care in rural areas. Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were merged with the American Community Survey and the Area Health Resources Files. Segregation was operationalized using the isolation index separately for African Americans and Hispanics. Multilevel logistic regression with random intercepts estimated four outcomes. In rural areas, segregation contributed to worse access to a usual source of health care but higher reports of health care needs being met among African Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]: 1.42, CI: 0.96-2.10) and Hispanics (AOR: 1.25, CI: 1.05-1.49). By broadening the spatial scale of segregation beyond urban areas, findings showed the complex interaction between social and spatial factors in rural areas. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Caldwell, Julia T.; Ford, Chandra L.; Wallace, Steven P.; Wang, May C.; Takahashi, Lois M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Objectives. To examine whether living in a rural versus urban area differentially exposes populations to social conditions associated with disparities in access to health care. Methods. We linked Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2005–2010) data to geographic data from the American Community Survey (2005–2009) and Area Health Resource File (2010). We categorized census tracts as rural and urban by using the Rural–Urban Commuting Area Codes. Respondent sample sizes ranged from 49 839 to 105 306. Outcomes were access to a usual source of health care, cholesterol screening, cervical screening, and dental visit within recommended intervals, and health care needs met. Results. African Americans in rural areas had lower odds of cholesterol screening (odds ratio [OR] = 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.25, 0.57) and cervical screening (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.29, 0.80) than African Americans in urban areas. Whites had fewer screenings and dental visits in rural versus urban areas. There were mixed results for which racial/ethnic group had better access....

    Objectives. To examine whether living in a rural versus urban area differentially exposes populations to social conditions associated with disparities in access to health care. Methods. We linked Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2005–2010) data to geographic data from the American Community Survey (2005–2009) and Area Health Resource File (2010). We categorized census tracts as rural and urban by using the Rural–Urban Commuting Area Codes. Respondent sample sizes ranged from 49 839 to 105 306. Outcomes were access to a usual source of health care, cholesterol screening, cervical screening, and dental visit within recommended intervals, and health care needs met. Results. African Americans in rural areas had lower odds of cholesterol screening (odds ratio [OR] = 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.25, 0.57) and cervical screening (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.29, 0.80) than African Americans in urban areas. Whites had fewer screenings and dental visits in rural versus urban areas. There were mixed results for which racial/ethnic group had better access. Conclusions. Rural status confers additional disadvantage for most of the health care use measures, independently of poverty and health care supply. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Boxmeyer, Caroline; Gilpin, Ansley; DeCaro, Jason; Lochman, John; Qu, Lixin; Mitchell, Qshequilla; Snead, Stacey
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This paper examines whether Power PATH, an integrated classroom and parent social-emotional curriculum, can be successfully implemented in Head Start settings, and whether it leads to significant improvements in child school-readiness and family well-being. Power PATH combines the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (Preschool PATHS) social-emotional classroom curriculum for children (Domitrovich, Greenberg, Cortes, & Kusche, 1999) with the Coping Power parent program (Wells, Lochman & Lenhart, 2008). The curricula each have an existing evidence-base for improving social-emotional functioning in children (Bierman et al., 2008; 2012; Domitrovich & Greenberg, 2007; Morris et al., 2014) and parents (e.g., Lochman & Wells, 2003, 2004; Lochman et al., 2006), respectively. The coordinated parent-child curriculum is designed to: create positive, consistent home and classroom environments; improve child and parent emotional self-regulation and interpersonal skills; and increase natural social supports. While Power PATH does not directly target parent employment or...

    This paper examines whether Power PATH, an integrated classroom and parent social-emotional curriculum, can be successfully implemented in Head Start settings, and whether it leads to significant improvements in child school-readiness and family well-being. Power PATH combines the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (Preschool PATHS) social-emotional classroom curriculum for children (Domitrovich, Greenberg, Cortes, & Kusche, 1999) with the Coping Power parent program (Wells, Lochman & Lenhart, 2008). The curricula each have an existing evidence-base for improving social-emotional functioning in children (Bierman et al., 2008; 2012; Domitrovich & Greenberg, 2007; Morris et al., 2014) and parents (e.g., Lochman & Wells, 2003, 2004; Lochman et al., 2006), respectively. The coordinated parent-child curriculum is designed to: create positive, consistent home and classroom environments; improve child and parent emotional self-regulation and interpersonal skills; and increase natural social supports. While Power PATH does not directly target parent employment or financial income, it is designed to enhance their social-emotional skills and resources, which are foundational to educational and financial attainment. The large, experimental study is being conducted in collaboration with a community action program that administers Head Start preschools in seven counties in Alabama. The study sample is predominantly Black/African American (75%) and from rural to semi-rural areas. Twenty-six classrooms across nine Head Start centers were randomly assigned (by center) to receive Power PATH or Head Start-as-usual. Initial pilot testing yielded evidence of strong, positive impacts. This paper will present findings from the first intervention cohort (n=117) in the following domains: implementation of Power PATH in Head Start preschools; program effects on children (cognitive and executive function skills, emotional and behavioral self-regulation, stress physiology) and parents/families (parental stress and mental health, emotional self-regulation, executive function, social support, educational and employment status, and financial well-being); and participant perceptions of Power PATH, including its sustainability in Head Start settings. Experimental impact findings will provide compelling evidence of whether Power PATH can serve as a valuable resource for improving low-income parent and child social-emotional functioning in an integrated way. (author abstract)

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