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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Maxwell, Kelly; Starr, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Licensing is traditionally viewed as providing the foundation (or the floor) of quality in early care and education (ECE) settings. States and territories are responsible for licensing child care programs, and a license serves as permission to legally operate a child care program. The essential purpose of licensing is to provide basic protections to prevent harm to children. Initiatives like Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) often build on the basic requirements of licensing to define quality and support programs in achieving higher levels of quality. This conceptualization of licensing as a basic, first step toward quality has begun to change recently. Licensing is increasingly viewed as integral all along the quality continuum, not just as the floor of quality. Further, some ECE policymakers are considering how all aspects of the licensing system—from the standards to monitoring compliance to enforcement—can support the quality of ECE. Although the conceptual relationship between licensing and quality is evolving, there is little research about how licensing...

    Licensing is traditionally viewed as providing the foundation (or the floor) of quality in early care and education (ECE) settings. States and territories are responsible for licensing child care programs, and a license serves as permission to legally operate a child care program. The essential purpose of licensing is to provide basic protections to prevent harm to children. Initiatives like Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) often build on the basic requirements of licensing to define quality and support programs in achieving higher levels of quality. This conceptualization of licensing as a basic, first step toward quality has begun to change recently. Licensing is increasingly viewed as integral all along the quality continuum, not just as the floor of quality. Further, some ECE policymakers are considering how all aspects of the licensing system—from the standards to monitoring compliance to enforcement—can support the quality of ECE. Although the conceptual relationship between licensing and quality is evolving, there is little research about how licensing influences quality. This brief provides a framework to support discussion and research in this important area. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Woolverton, Maria; Bradley, M.C.; Gabel, George; Melz, Heidi
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In the fall of 2014, OPRE organized an Innovative Methods meeting to explore cutting-edge applications of methods and analytic techniques that can inform social program practice and policy. This brief summarizes the meeting and includes:

    • A description of the meeting topic
    • An overview of each panel
    • The meeting agenda
    • Information about other products that came out of the meeting.

    The brief considers methods and designs that move beyond questions about whether or not programs and policies work, but also address questions about which particular parts work, under what circumstances, and how. You will also find potential steps to advance research that unpacks the “black box” of policy and program effects.

    In the fall of 2014, OPRE organized an Innovative Methods meeting to explore cutting-edge applications of methods and analytic techniques that can inform social program practice and policy. This brief summarizes the meeting and includes:

    • A description of the meeting topic
    • An overview of each panel
    • The meeting agenda
    • Information about other products that came out of the meeting.

    The brief considers methods and designs that move beyond questions about whether or not programs and policies work, but also address questions about which particular parts work, under what circumstances, and how. You will also find potential steps to advance research that unpacks the “black box” of policy and program effects.

  • Individual Author: McCay, Jonathan; Sandfort, Jodi; Goerge, Robert; Derr, Michelle; Tseng, Vivian
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes methods for building research capacity in social service agencies, including 1) rapid-cycle evaluation, 2) using administrative data for performance management and program decision support, 3) practices to engage program administrators in creating and using research evidence, and 4) evidence-based technical assistance.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes methods for building research capacity in social service agencies, including 1) rapid-cycle evaluation, 2) using administrative data for performance management and program decision support, 3) practices to engage program administrators in creating and using research evidence, and 4) evidence-based technical assistance.

  • Individual Author: Edin, Kathryn; Seefeldt, Kristin; Dutta-Gupta, Indivar ; Greenberg, Mark; Simms, Margaret; Cancian, Maria
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes the opening remarks and first plenary session on the second day of the conference. Plenary panelists included academics, researchers, and policymakers. The discussion centered around what is known about Americans living in deep poverty.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes the opening remarks and first plenary session on the second day of the conference. Plenary panelists included academics, researchers, and policymakers. The discussion centered around what is known about Americans living in deep poverty.

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