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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Kim, Jeounghee; Joo, Myungkook
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    How much did single mothers on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) work after welfare reform? Has their work participation stopped increasing recently? Since the U.S. Federal Government established mandatory work requirements for most TANF recipients and minimum annual work participation rates for States in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, welfare recipients' participation in work-related activities became the central issue among both policymakers and researchers. Under the law, an adult TANF recipient generally is required to participate in "core" and "supplementary" work activities for at least 30 hours per week. In response to PRWORA's requirement that recipients participate in work-related activities, there was a dramatic increase in adult welfare recipients' work activities, and the share of adults on Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) or TANF who were engaged in work-related activities for at least 1 hour per week in a typical month rose from 22.4 percent in 1996 to 43.1 percent in 2001. Many...

    How much did single mothers on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) work after welfare reform? Has their work participation stopped increasing recently? Since the U.S. Federal Government established mandatory work requirements for most TANF recipients and minimum annual work participation rates for States in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, welfare recipients' participation in work-related activities became the central issue among both policymakers and researchers. Under the law, an adult TANF recipient generally is required to participate in "core" and "supplementary" work activities for at least 30 hours per week. In response to PRWORA's requirement that recipients participate in work-related activities, there was a dramatic increase in adult welfare recipients' work activities, and the share of adults on Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) or TANF who were engaged in work-related activities for at least 1 hour per week in a typical month rose from 22.4 percent in 1996 to 43.1 percent in 2001. Many supporters of welfare reform viewed this increase in work participation as strong evidence of the success of PRWORA. In 2002, however, the weekly work participation rate decreased to 41.7 percent and then went to 41.2 percent in 2003 as the country's economy struggled to recover from the 2001 recession.

    This study finds that when consistent measures are used to calculate data on paid employment and other work-related activities of single mothers on TANF, the resulting rates of employment and participation in work-related activities are higher than those initially reported. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Regulation
    Year: 1999

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issues regulations governing key provisions of the new welfare block grant program enacted in 1996—the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF, program. It replaces the national welfare program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and the related programs known as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training Program (JOBS) and the Emergency Assistance (EA) program. These rules reflect new Federal, State, and Tribal relationships in the administration of welfare programs; a new focus on moving recipients into work; and a new emphasis on program information, measurement, and performance regulatory reform (author abstract). 

    64 Fed. Reg. 17720 (1999). 

     

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issues regulations governing key provisions of the new welfare block grant program enacted in 1996—the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF, program. It replaces the national welfare program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and the related programs known as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training Program (JOBS) and the Emergency Assistance (EA) program. These rules reflect new Federal, State, and Tribal relationships in the administration of welfare programs; a new focus on moving recipients into work; and a new emphasis on program information, measurement, and performance regulatory reform (author abstract). 

    64 Fed. Reg. 17720 (1999). 

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1996

    This statute ended the Aid to Families with Dependent Children welfare entitlement program, replacing it with the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) block grant program, which provides cash assistance to needy families and requires families to make verifiable work efforts to leave welfare. It also allowed funds to be used to encourage the maintenance and formation of two-parent families. A second block grant under the statute provided funds to states to subsidize child care for low-income families.

    Public Law No. 104-193 (1996).

    This statute ended the Aid to Families with Dependent Children welfare entitlement program, replacing it with the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) block grant program, which provides cash assistance to needy families and requires families to make verifiable work efforts to leave welfare. It also allowed funds to be used to encourage the maintenance and formation of two-parent families. A second block grant under the statute provided funds to states to subsidize child care for low-income families.

    Public Law No. 104-193 (1996).