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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The federal Office of Child Support Enforcement collects data from state child support agencies on the number of support orders that do not have a dollar support amount, referred to here as zero orders. These may reflect different types of orders – medical support only, shared custody, arrears only, or current support with no amount due. Zero orders have been increasing over time within the child support program. Today, they represent 10% of support orders nationally. This Story Behind the Numbers explores this trend and examines why zero orders have become more common in the child support program. (excerpt from author introduction)

    The federal Office of Child Support Enforcement collects data from state child support agencies on the number of support orders that do not have a dollar support amount, referred to here as zero orders. These may reflect different types of orders – medical support only, shared custody, arrears only, or current support with no amount due. Zero orders have been increasing over time within the child support program. Today, they represent 10% of support orders nationally. This Story Behind the Numbers explores this trend and examines why zero orders have become more common in the child support program. (excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    This guide offers information to help parents, and people who work with parents, better understand the child support review and modification process. It explains how parents can request to have their child support order changed when their financial situation changes. You’ll see that much of this guide relates to changes handled by the child support agency, although some state-specific information addresses court processes. Parents and others can find phone numbers, websites, and forms (where available) to help start the modification process. Parents who do not know a lot about the child support system may find this guide especially useful. It will also help parents who may not have access to the internet. The information focuses on how incarcerated parents can ask to have a child support order changed. And, it includes website links for partners to find more resources. If you want to help a parent navigate the child support system, this guide is for you! The federal Office of Child Support Enforcement prepared the guide, consulting with the state and territorial child support...

    This guide offers information to help parents, and people who work with parents, better understand the child support review and modification process. It explains how parents can request to have their child support order changed when their financial situation changes. You’ll see that much of this guide relates to changes handled by the child support agency, although some state-specific information addresses court processes. Parents and others can find phone numbers, websites, and forms (where available) to help start the modification process. Parents who do not know a lot about the child support system may find this guide especially useful. It will also help parents who may not have access to the internet. The information focuses on how incarcerated parents can ask to have a child support order changed. And, it includes website links for partners to find more resources. If you want to help a parent navigate the child support system, this guide is for you! The federal Office of Child Support Enforcement prepared the guide, consulting with the state and territorial child support offices. If a tribal program issued an order, please check with that program. Note that programs evolve and may offer newer information, so please check with your local child support agency for updates. (Author introduction) 

  • Individual Author: Solomon-Fears, Carmen; Falk, Gene; Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
    Year: 2013

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the...

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the policy community that might improve the lives of low-income noncustodial fathers and their children. For example, social policy could play a role by expanding economic assistance programs to noncustodial fathers, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); and implementing strategies to prevent the build-up of unpaid child support through early intervention. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    As a service member, or spouse or former spouse of one, you have unique child support needs.  All branches of the armed forces offer parenting programs and resources to strengthen military families.  This handbook supplements those resources by providing information you might need regarding paternity establishment, child support, access/visitation, and child custody.  First line supervisors and military commanders may also find this a handy addition to a leadership toolkit. (author abstract)

    As a service member, or spouse or former spouse of one, you have unique child support needs.  All branches of the armed forces offer parenting programs and resources to strengthen military families.  This handbook supplements those resources by providing information you might need regarding paternity establishment, child support, access/visitation, and child custody.  First line supervisors and military commanders may also find this a handy addition to a leadership toolkit. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    This fact sheet focuses on data reported in a recent U.S. Census Bureau report, Custodial Mothers and Fathers and Their Child Support: 2009.  The data reported are estimated based on a biennial survey of custodial parents, the Child Support Supplement to the Current Population Survey, March/April 2010, co-sponsored by the Office of Child Support Enforcement.

    While we have very detailed information on the IV-D caseload, there is no national source of information for total (IV-D and non-IV-D) child support recipients and total amount of child support received. We rely on nationally representative surveys such as this one to provide information on the total child support population. It is important to note that this survey includes both IV-D and non-IV-D families, but does not include households where children are living with someone other than their biological parent (e.g. aunt, uncle, grandparents). (author abstract)

    This fact sheet focuses on data reported in a recent U.S. Census Bureau report, Custodial Mothers and Fathers and Their Child Support: 2009.  The data reported are estimated based on a biennial survey of custodial parents, the Child Support Supplement to the Current Population Survey, March/April 2010, co-sponsored by the Office of Child Support Enforcement.

    While we have very detailed information on the IV-D caseload, there is no national source of information for total (IV-D and non-IV-D) child support recipients and total amount of child support received. We rely on nationally representative surveys such as this one to provide information on the total child support population. It is important to note that this survey includes both IV-D and non-IV-D families, but does not include households where children are living with someone other than their biological parent (e.g. aunt, uncle, grandparents). (author abstract)

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