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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Radel, Laura; Baldwin, Melinda; Crouse, Gilbert; Ghertner, Robin; Waters, Annette
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Codd, Nick
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program supports voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. The program builds on decades of scientific research showing that home visits by a nurse, social worker, early childhood educator, or othertrained professional during pregnancy and in the first years of a child’s life improve the lives of children and families by preventing child abuse and neglect, supporting positive parenting, improving maternal and child health, and promoting child development and school readiness. States, territories, and tribal communities receive funding through the MIECHV program and have the flexibility to select home visiting service delivery models that best meet state and local needs. The MIECHV program is administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) in partnership with the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). This resource for MIECHV awardees provides essential...

    The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program supports voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. The program builds on decades of scientific research showing that home visits by a nurse, social worker, early childhood educator, or othertrained professional during pregnancy and in the first years of a child’s life improve the lives of children and families by preventing child abuse and neglect, supporting positive parenting, improving maternal and child health, and promoting child development and school readiness. States, territories, and tribal communities receive funding through the MIECHV program and have the flexibility to select home visiting service delivery models that best meet state and local needs. The MIECHV program is administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) in partnership with the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). This resource for MIECHV awardees provides essential information about the opioid epidemic, opioid use disorder (OUD), and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). It includes relevant research; offers strategies for MIECHV awardees and their state partners in early childhood, public health, and substance misuse and mental health treatment; and highlights promising efforts underway in Maine, Colorado, West Virginia, and Massachusetts. (Excerpt from introduction)

  • Individual Author: Gubits, Daniel; Shinn, Marybeth; Bell, Stephen; Wood, Michelle; Dastrup, Samuel; Solari, Claudia D.; Brown, Scott R.; Brown, Steven; Dunton, Lauren; Lin, Winston; McInnis, Debi; Rodriguez, Jason; Savidge, Galen; Spellman, Brooke E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report, titled Short-Term Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, presents the short-term outcomes of the families enrolled in the Family Options Study, a multi-site random assignment experiment designed to study the impact of various housing and services interventions on homeless families. The report documents how families are faring approximately 20 months after random assignment to one of four interventions: community-based rapid re-housing (CBRR), project-based transitional housing (PBTH), permanent housing subsidy (SUB), and usual care (UC). Outcome measures fall within five domains: housing stability; family preservation; adult well-being; child well-being; and self-sufficiency. The collection of extensive cost data for each of the interventions tested enables the calculation of the costs that can be tied to each of the interventions, and in turn, used to understand the cost of achieving the outcomes observed. The study resulted in strong and significant findings, particularly related to the power of offering a voucher to a homeless family...

    This report, titled Short-Term Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, presents the short-term outcomes of the families enrolled in the Family Options Study, a multi-site random assignment experiment designed to study the impact of various housing and services interventions on homeless families. The report documents how families are faring approximately 20 months after random assignment to one of four interventions: community-based rapid re-housing (CBRR), project-based transitional housing (PBTH), permanent housing subsidy (SUB), and usual care (UC). Outcome measures fall within five domains: housing stability; family preservation; adult well-being; child well-being; and self-sufficiency. The collection of extensive cost data for each of the interventions tested enables the calculation of the costs that can be tied to each of the interventions, and in turn, used to understand the cost of achieving the outcomes observed. The study resulted in strong and significant findings, particularly related to the power of offering a voucher to a homeless family. HUD anticipates releasing the "long-term" outcomes of families within the next two years, and these findings will document how families are faring a full three years after random assignment, and how the costs of the different groups of families continue to evolve. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pendall, Rolf; Hendey, Leah; Greenberg, David; Pettit, Kathryn L.S.; Levy, Diane; Khare, Amy; Gallagher, Megan; Joseph, Mark; Curley, Alexandra; Rasheed, Aesha; Latham, Nancy; Brecher, Audra ; Hailey, Chantal
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

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