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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Stevens, Kathryn; Blatt, Lorraine; Minton,Sarah
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she get government help, or a subsidy, to pay for child care? What if she lost her job and needs child care while she hunts for a new one? If she is eligible for a subsidy, how much will the government pay, and how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to all of those questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances:

    • the ages of the children
    • the number of people in the family
    • income
    • where they live

    Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for...

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she get government help, or a subsidy, to pay for child care? What if she lost her job and needs child care while she hunts for a new one? If she is eligible for a subsidy, how much will the government pay, and how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to all of those questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances:

    • the ages of the children
    • the number of people in the family
    • income
    • where they live

    Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Hysell, Andrew
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the impact that early literacy has on poverty prevention.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the impact that early literacy has on poverty prevention.

  • Individual Author: Aspen Institute; Georgetown University
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    There is no greater challenge in the United States today than income inequality. It has been 50 years since the War on Poverty began. We have made progress but not enough. More than 32 million children live in low-income families, and racial and gender gaps persist. For the first time, Americans do not believe life will be better for the next generation. We have both a moral and an economic imperative to fuel social and economic mobility in this country.

    The Bottom Line: Investing for Impact on Economic Mobility in the U.S. recognizes the importance of learning from all sectors in tackling any challenge. Specifically, it builds on opportunities in the growing impact investment field. The report draws on the lessons from market-based approaches to identify tools and strategies that can help move the needle on family economic security. (publisher abstract)

    There is no greater challenge in the United States today than income inequality. It has been 50 years since the War on Poverty began. We have made progress but not enough. More than 32 million children live in low-income families, and racial and gender gaps persist. For the first time, Americans do not believe life will be better for the next generation. We have both a moral and an economic imperative to fuel social and economic mobility in this country.

    The Bottom Line: Investing for Impact on Economic Mobility in the U.S. recognizes the importance of learning from all sectors in tackling any challenge. Specifically, it builds on opportunities in the growing impact investment field. The report draws on the lessons from market-based approaches to identify tools and strategies that can help move the needle on family economic security. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Birkholz, JoAnn; Gregerson, Kathy
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    The Medica Foundation is the charitable giving arm of Medica Health Plans, a Minnesota-based, regional nonprofit health maintenance organization. The Medica Foundation funds community-based initiatives that support the needs of customers and the greater community by improving their health and removing barriers to health care services. Behavioral health has been a cornerstone funding area for the Medica Foundation over the last 10 years. (author introduction)

    The Medica Foundation is the charitable giving arm of Medica Health Plans, a Minnesota-based, regional nonprofit health maintenance organization. The Medica Foundation funds community-based initiatives that support the needs of customers and the greater community by improving their health and removing barriers to health care services. Behavioral health has been a cornerstone funding area for the Medica Foundation over the last 10 years. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ku, Leighton; Ferguson, Christine
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    This report briefly reviews the evidence about the effectiveness of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in addressing the health and financial needs of vulnerable Americans, including children and other vulnerable populations, including low-income parents, pregnant women, seniors and people with disabilities. The importance of Medicaid and CHIP to low-income children and adults is well understood; less evident is the extent to which Medicaid and CHIP protect populations with serious health problems. Children covered by Medicaid or CHIP are more likely than their privately-insured counterparts to be in poorer health status and to have serious health conditions, as are publicly-insured adults. Almost all elderly Americans are covered by Medicare, but low-income seniors who are also enrolled in Medicaid (sometimes called dual eligibles) tend to have substantially worse health than those with Medicare alone or with private coverage. The benefit structure of Medicaid is particularly designed to help address the serious health needs and low incomes of its...

    This report briefly reviews the evidence about the effectiveness of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in addressing the health and financial needs of vulnerable Americans, including children and other vulnerable populations, including low-income parents, pregnant women, seniors and people with disabilities. The importance of Medicaid and CHIP to low-income children and adults is well understood; less evident is the extent to which Medicaid and CHIP protect populations with serious health problems. Children covered by Medicaid or CHIP are more likely than their privately-insured counterparts to be in poorer health status and to have serious health conditions, as are publicly-insured adults. Almost all elderly Americans are covered by Medicare, but low-income seniors who are also enrolled in Medicaid (sometimes called dual eligibles) tend to have substantially worse health than those with Medicare alone or with private coverage. The benefit structure of Medicaid is particularly designed to help address the serious health needs and low incomes of its beneficiaries. Children covered by Medicaid have comprehensive services under its Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment policies.(author abstract)

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