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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Olson, Steve
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2017

    After decades of increases in the obesity rate among U.S. adults and children, the rate recently has dropped among some populations, particularly young children. What are the factors responsible for these changes? How can promising trends be accelerated? What else needs to be known to end the epidemic of obesity in the United States?

    To examine these and other pressing questions, the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions, of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, held a workshop in September 2016. The workshop brought together leaders from business, early care and education, government, health care, and philanthropy to discuss the most promising approaches for the future of obesity prevention and treatment. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop. (Author abstract)

    After decades of increases in the obesity rate among U.S. adults and children, the rate recently has dropped among some populations, particularly young children. What are the factors responsible for these changes? How can promising trends be accelerated? What else needs to be known to end the epidemic of obesity in the United States?

    To examine these and other pressing questions, the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions, of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, held a workshop in September 2016. The workshop brought together leaders from business, early care and education, government, health care, and philanthropy to discuss the most promising approaches for the future of obesity prevention and treatment. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory B.; Lowenstein, Christopher
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    In seeking to reduce the trafficking of benefits in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), states are considering policies to require that SNAP electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards include a photograph of the household head. Such policies have sparked controversy, placing in direct conflict the desires to bolster program integrity with the statutory rights of SNAP household members to utilize their program benefits and receive equal customer treatment. Drawing on Massachusetts’ 2013 implementation of a photo EBT policy, this brief suggests that such policies are not a cost-effective means to promote program integrity and may hinder benefit access. (Author introduction)

     

    In seeking to reduce the trafficking of benefits in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), states are considering policies to require that SNAP electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards include a photograph of the household head. Such policies have sparked controversy, placing in direct conflict the desires to bolster program integrity with the statutory rights of SNAP household members to utilize their program benefits and receive equal customer treatment. Drawing on Massachusetts’ 2013 implementation of a photo EBT policy, this brief suggests that such policies are not a cost-effective means to promote program integrity and may hinder benefit access. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Shetty, Prakash
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    The concept of food security developed over the last 50 or more years addressed primarily the need for the production and access to adequate food grains to feed the world’s increasing population. Nutrition security, a later development, was a much broader concept since nutritious and safe diets alongside adequate biological and proper social environments ensures appropriate growth and development in childhood and helps promote health and prevent disease in adulthood. The need for a paradigm shift in policy formulation from focusing on food security at the aggregate level to nutrition security at the level of each child and adult implied that the definition ‘food and nutrition security’ integrates both the conceptual frameworks of food security and nutrition security. This integrated approach aspires not merely to address the micronutrient malnutrition which is a bigger problem than food energy deficiency, but is a food-based approach that also tackles non-food factors such as water, sanitation and care practices. (Author abstract)

     

    The concept of food security developed over the last 50 or more years addressed primarily the need for the production and access to adequate food grains to feed the world’s increasing population. Nutrition security, a later development, was a much broader concept since nutritious and safe diets alongside adequate biological and proper social environments ensures appropriate growth and development in childhood and helps promote health and prevent disease in adulthood. The need for a paradigm shift in policy formulation from focusing on food security at the aggregate level to nutrition security at the level of each child and adult implied that the definition ‘food and nutrition security’ integrates both the conceptual frameworks of food security and nutrition security. This integrated approach aspires not merely to address the micronutrient malnutrition which is a bigger problem than food energy deficiency, but is a food-based approach that also tackles non-food factors such as water, sanitation and care practices. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    For years, over a dozen LIHEAP grantees coordinated their LIHEAP and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs (SNAP) to help low-income households both heat their homes and feed their families. They did this through programs known as “Heat and Eat,” under which they provided a nominal benefit- from $1 to $5- to help low-income households maximize their Standard Utility Allowance under SNAP. The nominal LIHEAP benefit allowed these households to maximize their SNAP benefits. This practice changed with passage of the 2014 Farm Bill, which required that the LIHEAP benefit in Heat and Eat (H&E) be more than $20. This issue brief will examine the history of H&E; the impact of the 2014 Farm Bill; and how LIHEAP grantees, federal lawmakers, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have responded to the Farm Bill’s requirement. (Author introduction)

    For years, over a dozen LIHEAP grantees coordinated their LIHEAP and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs (SNAP) to help low-income households both heat their homes and feed their families. They did this through programs known as “Heat and Eat,” under which they provided a nominal benefit- from $1 to $5- to help low-income households maximize their Standard Utility Allowance under SNAP. The nominal LIHEAP benefit allowed these households to maximize their SNAP benefits. This practice changed with passage of the 2014 Farm Bill, which required that the LIHEAP benefit in Heat and Eat (H&E) be more than $20. This issue brief will examine the history of H&E; the impact of the 2014 Farm Bill; and how LIHEAP grantees, federal lawmakers, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have responded to the Farm Bill’s requirement. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Finegold, Kenneth; Pindus, Nancy M.; Wherry, Laura; Nelson, Sandi; Triplett, Timothy; Capps, Randolph
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    This report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, reviews existing data sources and prior research on six programs operated by the Department that provide food assistance to American Indians living on or near reservations. The purpose of the review is to help identify future research needs and opportunities to exploit administrative data systems and recurring national surveys. The programs covered are the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), the Food Stamp Program (FSP), the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP). Research topics of continuing importance include the impacts of reservation food assistance on health and nutrition, the characteristics that make nutrition education effective on reservations, the dynamics of program participation, and the contribution of tribal administration to program coordination. (Author abstract)

    This report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, reviews existing data sources and prior research on six programs operated by the Department that provide food assistance to American Indians living on or near reservations. The purpose of the review is to help identify future research needs and opportunities to exploit administrative data systems and recurring national surveys. The programs covered are the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), the Food Stamp Program (FSP), the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP). Research topics of continuing importance include the impacts of reservation food assistance on health and nutrition, the characteristics that make nutrition education effective on reservations, the dynamics of program participation, and the contribution of tribal administration to program coordination. (Author abstract)

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