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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wiseman, Michael
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2017

    Transformation of the Food Stamp Program (FSP) into a near-universal system of food-oriented income support renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was arguably the most significant development in American social policy during the first decade of the new millennium. Three events were the primary drivers of the change: (1) contraction of traditional welfare assistance that followed the 1996 transformation of Aid to Families with Dependent Children into Temporary Assistance for Needy Families; (2) progressive relaxation of federal eligibility requirements for food stamp receipt beginning in 2000; and (3) demand for help generated by the Great Recession (GR) of 2007 to 2009. Even with this metamorphosis, SNAP is only one component of the U.S. "safety net," and attention to the program's interface with other safety net components is essential to overall evaluation and planning for improvement. Material from this paper will appear as chapter 3 in The Middle-Class Safety Net in the Great Recession: Unemployment Insurance and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance...

    Transformation of the Food Stamp Program (FSP) into a near-universal system of food-oriented income support renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was arguably the most significant development in American social policy during the first decade of the new millennium. Three events were the primary drivers of the change: (1) contraction of traditional welfare assistance that followed the 1996 transformation of Aid to Families with Dependent Children into Temporary Assistance for Needy Families; (2) progressive relaxation of federal eligibility requirements for food stamp receipt beginning in 2000; and (3) demand for help generated by the Great Recession (GR) of 2007 to 2009. Even with this metamorphosis, SNAP is only one component of the U.S. "safety net," and attention to the program's interface with other safety net components is essential to overall evaluation and planning for improvement. Material from this paper will appear as chapter 3 in The Middle-Class Safety Net in the Great Recession: Unemployment Insurance and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Working Together, to be published by the W. E. Upjohn Institute in 2018. The book's object is to use the GR experience to inform both Unemployment Insurance (UI) and SNAP policy development in the future. The intent of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive overview of the SNAP program as operated through the GR that explains structure, reviews consequences, and lays part of the foundation for the book's state-specific analyses and its conclusions. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Gray, Kelsey Farson; Fisher, Sarah; Lauffer, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report describes the characteristics of SNAP households and participants and presents an overview of SNAP eligibility requirements and benefit levels in fiscal year 2015 (October 2014 through September 2015). In fiscal year 2015, approximately 82 percent of SNAP households lived in poverty; these households received 57 percent of all benefits. Seventy-five percent of SNAP households included a child, an elderly individual, or an individual with a disability; these households received 82 percent of all benefits. The average SNAP monthly benefit in fiscal year 2015 was $254. (Author abstract)

    This report describes the characteristics of SNAP households and participants and presents an overview of SNAP eligibility requirements and benefit levels in fiscal year 2015 (October 2014 through September 2015). In fiscal year 2015, approximately 82 percent of SNAP households lived in poverty; these households received 57 percent of all benefits. Seventy-five percent of SNAP households included a child, an elderly individual, or an individual with a disability; these households received 82 percent of all benefits. The average SNAP monthly benefit in fiscal year 2015 was $254. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory B.; Lowenstein, Christopher
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    In seeking to reduce the trafficking of benefits in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), states are considering policies to require that SNAP electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards include a photograph of the household head. Such policies have sparked controversy, placing in direct conflict the desires to bolster program integrity with the statutory rights of SNAP household members to utilize their program benefits and receive equal customer treatment. Drawing on Massachusetts’ 2013 implementation of a photo EBT policy, this brief suggests that such policies are not a cost-effective means to promote program integrity and may hinder benefit access. (Author introduction)

     

    In seeking to reduce the trafficking of benefits in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), states are considering policies to require that SNAP electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards include a photograph of the household head. Such policies have sparked controversy, placing in direct conflict the desires to bolster program integrity with the statutory rights of SNAP household members to utilize their program benefits and receive equal customer treatment. Drawing on Massachusetts’ 2013 implementation of a photo EBT policy, this brief suggests that such policies are not a cost-effective means to promote program integrity and may hinder benefit access. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Shetty, Prakash
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    The concept of food security developed over the last 50 or more years addressed primarily the need for the production and access to adequate food grains to feed the world’s increasing population. Nutrition security, a later development, was a much broader concept since nutritious and safe diets alongside adequate biological and proper social environments ensures appropriate growth and development in childhood and helps promote health and prevent disease in adulthood. The need for a paradigm shift in policy formulation from focusing on food security at the aggregate level to nutrition security at the level of each child and adult implied that the definition ‘food and nutrition security’ integrates both the conceptual frameworks of food security and nutrition security. This integrated approach aspires not merely to address the micronutrient malnutrition which is a bigger problem than food energy deficiency, but is a food-based approach that also tackles non-food factors such as water, sanitation and care practices. (Author abstract)

     

    The concept of food security developed over the last 50 or more years addressed primarily the need for the production and access to adequate food grains to feed the world’s increasing population. Nutrition security, a later development, was a much broader concept since nutritious and safe diets alongside adequate biological and proper social environments ensures appropriate growth and development in childhood and helps promote health and prevent disease in adulthood. The need for a paradigm shift in policy formulation from focusing on food security at the aggregate level to nutrition security at the level of each child and adult implied that the definition ‘food and nutrition security’ integrates both the conceptual frameworks of food security and nutrition security. This integrated approach aspires not merely to address the micronutrient malnutrition which is a bigger problem than food energy deficiency, but is a food-based approach that also tackles non-food factors such as water, sanitation and care practices. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    Virtually all states have made basic program information on the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs — SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as Food Stamps), Medicaid, CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program), TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), and child care assistance — available to the public via the Internet.  Many states, however, go much further, providing information such as application forms and data on the number of participants.  A number of states allow individuals to apply for benefits and transact certain related business online.  In addition to information provided for the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs, 30 states have General Assistance (GA) programs for individuals not qualifying for any other public assistance, and provide basic program information for GA online as well.   

    This paper provides links to state information available online for these benefit programs.  Individuals seeking information about eligibility and benefits in a particular state will find these links...

    Virtually all states have made basic program information on the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs — SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as Food Stamps), Medicaid, CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program), TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), and child care assistance — available to the public via the Internet.  Many states, however, go much further, providing information such as application forms and data on the number of participants.  A number of states allow individuals to apply for benefits and transact certain related business online.  In addition to information provided for the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs, 30 states have General Assistance (GA) programs for individuals not qualifying for any other public assistance, and provide basic program information for GA online as well.   

    This paper provides links to state information available online for these benefit programs.  Individuals seeking information about eligibility and benefits in a particular state will find these links a useful place to start.  Most state human service agencies also provide phone numbers for families to seek additional information.  In addition, individuals in most states (as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) can call 2-1-1 on any type of telephone for help finding out about many kinds of assistance, including emergency help with food, housing, or clothing; physical or mental health treatment; and assistance for the aged, people with disabilities, and families with children. (author abstract) 

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