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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hickey, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    As transit systems expand and deliver improved connectivity, demand for housing within walking distance of transit stops is expected to grow, leading to higher rents and home prices that may price existing and prospective lower income households out of these neighborhoods. This paper examines the potential role of community land trusts (CLTs) to help address these concerns and ensure that transit-oriented development (TOD) is affordable to lower income households over the long term. Using case studies of CLTs engaged in TOD efforts in Atlanta, Denver, and the Twin Cities, this paper explores the opportunities, challenges, and supports that exist for CLTs eyeing future TOD endeavors. (author abstract)

    As transit systems expand and deliver improved connectivity, demand for housing within walking distance of transit stops is expected to grow, leading to higher rents and home prices that may price existing and prospective lower income households out of these neighborhoods. This paper examines the potential role of community land trusts (CLTs) to help address these concerns and ensure that transit-oriented development (TOD) is affordable to lower income households over the long term. Using case studies of CLTs engaged in TOD efforts in Atlanta, Denver, and the Twin Cities, this paper explores the opportunities, challenges, and supports that exist for CLTs eyeing future TOD endeavors. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Leckie, Norm; Shek-Wai Hui, Taylor; Tattrie, Doug; Robson, Jennifer; Voyer, Jean-Pierre
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    In today’s economy, people who lack sufficient education and basic skills are exposing themselves to lower earnings and higher risk of unemployment. This has been a source of concern for Canadian governments over the last two decades. That concern, along with the desire to build a competitive workforce, explains why governments have been looking for ways to encourage Canadians to invest in their own human capital.

    learn$ave was introduced as a demonstration project to test the effectiveness of a new instrument – Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) – to encourage low-income adults to save for their own education or training. The use of IDAs was pioneered in the United States in the 1990s and introduced in Canada on a small scale more recently. In general, IDAs work as regular saving accounts, with account holders receiving a matching grant for every dollar they deposit. To benefit from the matching grant, savings have to be used for specific purposes. In learn$ave, savings could be used for education, training or starting a small business.

    There has been much...

    In today’s economy, people who lack sufficient education and basic skills are exposing themselves to lower earnings and higher risk of unemployment. This has been a source of concern for Canadian governments over the last two decades. That concern, along with the desire to build a competitive workforce, explains why governments have been looking for ways to encourage Canadians to invest in their own human capital.

    learn$ave was introduced as a demonstration project to test the effectiveness of a new instrument – Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) – to encourage low-income adults to save for their own education or training. The use of IDAs was pioneered in the United States in the 1990s and introduced in Canada on a small scale more recently. In general, IDAs work as regular saving accounts, with account holders receiving a matching grant for every dollar they deposit. To benefit from the matching grant, savings have to be used for specific purposes. In learn$ave, savings could be used for education, training or starting a small business.

    There has been much discussion of the promise of IDAs, but little proof of their alleged effectiveness, particularly in Canada and particularly in regard to incentivizing adult education and business start-ups. Would the offer be appealing to the target group? Would the program contribute to increasing education enrolment and small business start-ups among participants? Would it improve labour market outcomes? This is the reason why, in 2000, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) funded learn$ave, a nine-year demonstration project to test the IDA approach.

    This report presents final results of the learn$ave project covering the entire 54-month period after participants’ entry into the project. It summarizes findings based on all lines of evidence, including participant surveys, focus groups, and administrative data. While the emphasis is placed on impacts on participants’ savings and education enrolment, important implementation issues around recruitment and take-up as well as cost-effectiveness issues are also addressed. (author introduction)