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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
    Year: 2015

    Each year since 2003, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has produced the National Healthcare Quality Report and the National Healthcare Disparities Report. These reports to Congress are mandated in the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-129). Beginning with the 2014 reports, findings on health care quality and health care disparities are integrated into a single document. The new National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report (QDR) highlights the importance of examining quality and disparities together to gain a complete picture of health care. The QDR provides a comprehensive overview of the quality of health care received by the general U.S. population and disparities in care experienced by different racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. The report is based on more than 250 measures of quality and disparities covering a broad array of health care services and settings. (author overview)

    Each year since 2003, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has produced the National Healthcare Quality Report and the National Healthcare Disparities Report. These reports to Congress are mandated in the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-129). Beginning with the 2014 reports, findings on health care quality and health care disparities are integrated into a single document. The new National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report (QDR) highlights the importance of examining quality and disparities together to gain a complete picture of health care. The QDR provides a comprehensive overview of the quality of health care received by the general U.S. population and disparities in care experienced by different racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. The report is based on more than 250 measures of quality and disparities covering a broad array of health care services and settings. (author overview)

  • Individual Author: Iritani, Katherine M.
    Year: 2013

    In five selected states, GAO determined that the separate State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) plans were generally comparable to the benchmark plans selected by states in 2012 as models for the benefits that will be offered through qualified health plans (QHP) in 2014. The plans were comparable in the services they covered and the services on which they imposed limits, although there was some variation. For example, in coverage of hearing and outpatient therapy services, the benchmark plan in one of the five states--Kansas--did not cover hearing aids nor hearing tests, while the CHIP plans in all states covered at least one of these services. Similarly, two states' CHIP plans and three states' benchmark plans did not cover certain outpatient therapies--known as habilitative services--to help individuals attain or maintain skills they had not learned due to a disability. States' CHIP and benchmark state plans were also similar in terms of the services on which they imposed day, visit, or dollar limits. Plans most commonly imposed limits on outpatient therapies and...

    In five selected states, GAO determined that the separate State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) plans were generally comparable to the benchmark plans selected by states in 2012 as models for the benefits that will be offered through qualified health plans (QHP) in 2014. The plans were comparable in the services they covered and the services on which they imposed limits, although there was some variation. For example, in coverage of hearing and outpatient therapy services, the benchmark plan in one of the five states--Kansas--did not cover hearing aids nor hearing tests, while the CHIP plans in all states covered at least one of these services. Similarly, two states' CHIP plans and three states' benchmark plans did not cover certain outpatient therapies--known as habilitative services--to help individuals attain or maintain skills they had not learned due to a disability. States' CHIP and benchmark state plans were also similar in terms of the services on which they imposed day, visit, or dollar limits. Plans most commonly imposed limits on outpatient therapies and pediatric dental, vision, and hearing services. Officials in all five states expect that CHIP coverage, including limits on these services, will remain relatively unchanged in 2014, while QHPs offered in the exchanges will be subject to certain Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) requirements, such as the elimination of annual dollar limits on coverage for certain services.

    Consumers' costs for these services--defined as deductibles, copayments, coinsurance, and premiums--were almost always less in the five selected states' CHIP plans when compared to their respective benchmark plans. For example, the CHIP plan in the five states typically did not include deductibles while all five states' benchmark plans did. Similarly, when cost-sharing applied, the amount was almost always less for CHIP plans, and the cost difference was particularly pronounced for physician visits, prescription drugs, and outpatient therapies. For example, an office visit to a specialist in Colorado would cost a CHIP enrollee $2 to $10 per visit, depending on their income, compared to $50 per visit for benchmark plan enrollees. GAO's review of premium data further suggests that CHIP premiums are also lower than benchmark plans' premiums. While CHIP officials in five states expect consumer costs to remain largely unchanged in 2014, the cost of QHPs to consumers is less certain. These plans were not yet available at the time of GAO's review. However, PPACA includes provisions that seek to standardize QHP costs or reduce cost-sharing amounts for certain individuals.

    When asked about access to care in the national Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), CHIP enrollees reported positive responses regarding their ability to obtain care, and the proportion of positive responses was generally comparable to those with Medicaid--the federal and state program for very low-income children and families--or with private insurance. Regarding use of services, the proportion of CHIP enrollees who reported using certain services was generally comparable to Medicaid, but differed from those with private insurance for certain services. Specifically, a higher proportion of CHIP enrollees reported using emergency room services, and a lower proportion of CHIP enrollees reported visiting dentists and orthodontists. HHS provided technical comments on a draft of this report, which GAO incorporated as appropriate. (author abstract)