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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Choi, Laura; Erickson, David; Griffin, Kate; Levere, Andrea; Seidman, Ellen
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    This book examines the concept of financial health and well-being from many perspectives, bringing together the voices of long-time champions of financial capability and newer voices hailing from a variety of sectors, such as public health, criminal justice, and business. What unites them is the shared recognition that we must do more to help all Americans have control over their financial lives and achieve their financial goals. As represented on the book’s cover, financial health and well-being is the bridge to a strong financial future, connecting individuals and families to greater opportunity, creating more vibrant communities, and in turn, strengthening the social and economic fabric of our nation. (Author introduction)

    This book examines the concept of financial health and well-being from many perspectives, bringing together the voices of long-time champions of financial capability and newer voices hailing from a variety of sectors, such as public health, criminal justice, and business. What unites them is the shared recognition that we must do more to help all Americans have control over their financial lives and achieve their financial goals. As represented on the book’s cover, financial health and well-being is the bridge to a strong financial future, connecting individuals and families to greater opportunity, creating more vibrant communities, and in turn, strengthening the social and economic fabric of our nation. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Raphael, Steven
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2014

    Raphael provides a concise overview of the barriers faced by ex-convicts as they attempt to reenter the U.S. labor market. First, he studies the factors that influence the market’s supply and demand sides. Next, he presents an empirical portrait of the inmate population, recently released inmates, and the youth who eventually enter the prison system as young adults. Raphael reviews what is known about how employers use criminal histories in screening job applicants and the empirical research on the effects of a criminal record on labor market outcomes; he then describes programs designed to help inmates enter the labor force that show positive results. Raphael concludes with a set of policy recommendations aimed at addressing the concerns of employers and preparing inmates for the labor force as they exit the prison system. (author abstract)

    Raphael provides a concise overview of the barriers faced by ex-convicts as they attempt to reenter the U.S. labor market. First, he studies the factors that influence the market’s supply and demand sides. Next, he presents an empirical portrait of the inmate population, recently released inmates, and the youth who eventually enter the prison system as young adults. Raphael reviews what is known about how employers use criminal histories in screening job applicants and the empirical research on the effects of a criminal record on labor market outcomes; he then describes programs designed to help inmates enter the labor force that show positive results. Raphael concludes with a set of policy recommendations aimed at addressing the concerns of employers and preparing inmates for the labor force as they exit the prison system. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Arditti, Joyce A.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2012

    Over 2% of U.S. children under the age of 18—more than 1,700,000 children—have a parent in prison. These children experience very real disadvantages when compared to their peers: they tend to experience lower levels of educational success, social exclusion, and even a higher likelihood of their own future incarceration. Meanwhile, their new caregivers have to adjust to their new responsibilities as their lives change overnight, and the incarcerated parents are cut off from their children’s development.

    Parental Incarceration and the Family brings a family perspective to our understanding of what it means to have so many of our nation’s parents in prison. Drawing from the field’s most recent research and the author’s own fieldwork, Joyce Arditti offers an in-depth look at how incarceration affects entire families: offender parents, children, and care-givers. Through the use of exemplars, anecdotes, and reflections, Joyce Arditti puts a human face on the mass of humanity behind bars, as well as those family members who are affected by a parent’s imprisonment. In focusing on...

    Over 2% of U.S. children under the age of 18—more than 1,700,000 children—have a parent in prison. These children experience very real disadvantages when compared to their peers: they tend to experience lower levels of educational success, social exclusion, and even a higher likelihood of their own future incarceration. Meanwhile, their new caregivers have to adjust to their new responsibilities as their lives change overnight, and the incarcerated parents are cut off from their children’s development.

    Parental Incarceration and the Family brings a family perspective to our understanding of what it means to have so many of our nation’s parents in prison. Drawing from the field’s most recent research and the author’s own fieldwork, Joyce Arditti offers an in-depth look at how incarceration affects entire families: offender parents, children, and care-givers. Through the use of exemplars, anecdotes, and reflections, Joyce Arditti puts a human face on the mass of humanity behind bars, as well as those family members who are affected by a parent’s imprisonment. In focusing on offenders as parents, a radically different social policy agenda emerges—one that calls for real reform and that responds to the collective vulnerabilities of the incarcerated and their kin. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Harris, Yvette R.; Graham, James A.; Carpenter, Gloria J. O.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2010

    This book serves as a comprehensive source for understanding and intervening with children of incarcerated parents. The text examines the daunting clinical implications inherent in trauma throughout development, as well as social and political roles in ameliorating intergenerational delinquency. This book conceptualizes the problem by using an ecological framework that is focused on the experience of the child.

    Children of Incarcerated Parents addresses developmental and clinical issues experienced throughout the trajectory of childhood and adolescence with a focus on interventions and social policies to improve outcomes for this under-studied group.The chapters explore individual, community, and national levels of policy, programming, and legislation. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents:

    Section One: Framework

    Chapter One: The Changing Landscape in the American Prison Population: Implications for Children of Incarcerated Parents, James A. Graham, Yvette R. Harris, and Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter

    Chapter Two: Parents "in...

    This book serves as a comprehensive source for understanding and intervening with children of incarcerated parents. The text examines the daunting clinical implications inherent in trauma throughout development, as well as social and political roles in ameliorating intergenerational delinquency. This book conceptualizes the problem by using an ecological framework that is focused on the experience of the child.

    Children of Incarcerated Parents addresses developmental and clinical issues experienced throughout the trajectory of childhood and adolescence with a focus on interventions and social policies to improve outcomes for this under-studied group.The chapters explore individual, community, and national levels of policy, programming, and legislation. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents:

    Section One: Framework

    Chapter One: The Changing Landscape in the American Prison Population: Implications for Children of Incarcerated Parents, James A. Graham, Yvette R. Harris, and Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter

    Chapter Two: Parents "in the System:" An Ecological Systems Approach to the Development of Children with Incarcerated Parents, Tabitha R. Holmes, Kimberley Belmonte, Margaret Wentworth, and Kathleen Tillman

    Section Two: Developmental Trajectories

    Chapter Three: Children of Incarcerated Parents: Developmental Trajectories Among School-Age Children, Sophie Naudeau

    Chapter Four: Children of Promise, Kathy Boudin and Sarah Zeller-Berkman

    Section Three: Environmental Considerations

    Chapter Five: The Effects of Incarceration on Neighborhoods and Communities, He Len Chung and Daniel McFadden

    Chapter Six: Living Arrangements of Children of Incarcerated Parents: The Roles of Stability, Embeddedness, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity, Holly Foster

    Section Four: Parenting from Prison

    Chapter Seven: Building Partnerships to Strengthen Families: Intervention Programs and Recommendations, Kristina Toth and Kerry Kazura

    Chapter Eight: Strengthening Parent-Child Relationships:Visit Coaching with Children and their Incarcerated Parents, Marty Beyer, Randi Blumenthal-Guigui, and Tanya Krupat

    Section Five: Current and Future Directions

    Chapter Nine: Child Welfare Legislation and Policies: Foster Children with a Parent in Prison, Adela Beckerman

    Chapter Ten: Service Planning and Intervention Development for Children of Incarcerated Parents, Susan D. Phillips

    Chapter Eleven: The Challenge of Family Reunification, Yvette R. Harris, Vanessa A. Harris, James A. Graham, and Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter

    Chapter Twelve: Research and Intervention Issues for Moving Forward with Development in Children of Incarcerated Parents, Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter, James A. Graham, and Yvette R. Harris

  • Individual Author: Western, Bruce
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2007

    Over the last thirty years, the prison population in the United States has increased more than sevenfold to over 2 million people, including vastly disproportionate numbers of minorities and people with little education. For some racial and educational groups, incarceration has become a depressingly regular experience, and prison culture and influence pervade their communities. Almost 60 percent of black male high school drop-outs in their early thirties have spent time in prison. In Punishment and Inequality in America, sociologist Bruce Western explores the recent era of mass incarceration and the serious social and economic consequences it has wrought.
     
    Punishment and Inequality in America dispels many of the myths about the relationships among crime, imprisonment, and inequality. While many people support the increase in incarceration because of recent reductions in crime, Western shows that the decrease in crime rates in the 1990s was mostly fueled by growth in city police forces and the pacification of the drug trade. Getting “tough on crime”...

    Over the last thirty years, the prison population in the United States has increased more than sevenfold to over 2 million people, including vastly disproportionate numbers of minorities and people with little education. For some racial and educational groups, incarceration has become a depressingly regular experience, and prison culture and influence pervade their communities. Almost 60 percent of black male high school drop-outs in their early thirties have spent time in prison. In Punishment and Inequality in America, sociologist Bruce Western explores the recent era of mass incarceration and the serious social and economic consequences it has wrought.
     
    Punishment and Inequality in America dispels many of the myths about the relationships among crime, imprisonment, and inequality. While many people support the increase in incarceration because of recent reductions in crime, Western shows that the decrease in crime rates in the 1990s was mostly fueled by growth in city police forces and the pacification of the drug trade. Getting “tough on crime” with longer sentences only explains about 10 percent of the fall in crime, but has come at a significant cost. Punishment and Inequality in America reveals a strong relationship between incarceration and severely dampened economic prospects for former inmates. Western finds that because of their involvement in the penal system, young black men hardly benefited from the economic boom of the 1990s. Those who spent time in prison had much lower wages and employment rates than did similar men without criminal records. The losses from mass incarceration spread to the social sphere as well, leaving one out of ten young black children with a father behind bars by the end of the 1990s, thereby helping perpetuate the damaging cycle of broken families, poverty, and crime.
     
    The recent explosion of imprisonment is exacting heavy costs on American society and exacerbating inequality. Whereas college or the military were once the formative institutions in young men’s lives, prison has increasingly usurped that role in many communities. Punishment and Inequality in America profiles how the growth in incarceration came about and the toll it is taking on the social and economic fabric of many American communities. (author abstract)

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