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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Strawn, Julie
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    SNAP E&T and State and local workforce agencies share a common goal of helping low-income individuals gain the skills necessary to qualify for jobs leading to self-sufficiency. A March 2016 joint letter issued by the Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) and the Department of Labor’s (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) encouraged SNAP and the workforce system to collaborate on shared strategies that connect SNAP participants to employment and training services through American Job Centers (AJCs). In particular, the letter emphasized ways to provide services to Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWDs). (Author introduction)

    SNAP E&T and State and local workforce agencies share a common goal of helping low-income individuals gain the skills necessary to qualify for jobs leading to self-sufficiency. A March 2016 joint letter issued by the Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) and the Department of Labor’s (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) encouraged SNAP and the workforce system to collaborate on shared strategies that connect SNAP participants to employment and training services through American Job Centers (AJCs). In particular, the letter emphasized ways to provide services to Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWDs). (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Katz, Michael
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the Work Support Strategies Initiative, an effort to improve families’ well-being by increasing enrollment in the full package of work supports. The Initiative also seeks to help states deliver benefits more effectively and efficiently and share lessons learned to inform state and federal policies.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the Work Support Strategies Initiative, an effort to improve families’ well-being by increasing enrollment in the full package of work supports. The Initiative also seeks to help states deliver benefits more effectively and efficiently and share lessons learned to inform state and federal policies.

  • Individual Author: Sonchak, Lyudmyla
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    In this study, we estimate the effect of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infant and Children (WIC) on breastfeeding initiation at hospital discharge and gestational weight gain, by relying on South Carolina birth certificates data for 2004–2013. The unique longitudinal feature of the data allows us to utilize maternal fixed effects to account for non-random selection into WIC. Contrary to the existing evidence, we find that WIC participation does not have a negative effect on breastfeeding initiation. We uncover an important heterogeneity in WIC's effect by race. More specifically, we find that WIC participation is associated with an increase in breastfeeding initiation among black mothers by nearly 7%, with no statistically significant effect among white mothers. We also document a reduction in the likelihood of an inadequate gestational weight gain of nearly 10% among white and black mothers. (Author abstract)

     

    In this study, we estimate the effect of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infant and Children (WIC) on breastfeeding initiation at hospital discharge and gestational weight gain, by relying on South Carolina birth certificates data for 2004–2013. The unique longitudinal feature of the data allows us to utilize maternal fixed effects to account for non-random selection into WIC. Contrary to the existing evidence, we find that WIC participation does not have a negative effect on breastfeeding initiation. We uncover an important heterogeneity in WIC's effect by race. More specifically, we find that WIC participation is associated with an increase in breastfeeding initiation among black mothers by nearly 7%, with no statistically significant effect among white mothers. We also document a reduction in the likelihood of an inadequate gestational weight gain of nearly 10% among white and black mothers. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: James, Cemerè
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Isaacs, Julia; Wagner, Jennifer; Forster, Hilary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

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