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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Masters, N. Tatiana; Lindhorst, Taryn P.; Meyers, Marcia K.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Current welfare scholarship lacks an analysis of how caseworkers discuss sexuality-related issues with clients. Seventy-two of 232 transcribed welfare interviews in three states included discussion of reproductive decisions and relationships. Overall, caseworkers’ language reflected negative myths regarding African American women’s sexuality and motherhood. By virtue of their status as welfare recipients, regardless of their individual races, clients were placed into racialized myths through workers’ talk. This analysis demonstrates that though not present in every welfare interview and often veiled in bureaucratic language, negative ideas about poor women’s sexuality persist in welfare policy and are deeply embedded in its day-to-day implementation. (author abstract)

    Current welfare scholarship lacks an analysis of how caseworkers discuss sexuality-related issues with clients. Seventy-two of 232 transcribed welfare interviews in three states included discussion of reproductive decisions and relationships. Overall, caseworkers’ language reflected negative myths regarding African American women’s sexuality and motherhood. By virtue of their status as welfare recipients, regardless of their individual races, clients were placed into racialized myths through workers’ talk. This analysis demonstrates that though not present in every welfare interview and often veiled in bureaucratic language, negative ideas about poor women’s sexuality persist in welfare policy and are deeply embedded in its day-to-day implementation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Montoya, Isaac D.; Brown, Victoria L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    This article examines the extent to which Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) recipients file income tax returns and take advantage of the Earned Income Credit (EIC), a program specifically designed to increase the economic self-sufficiency of lower income earners by supplementing earned and other income to make working more profitable. This study consisted primarily of Black and Hispanic women (n = 317), recruited for a longitudinal study designed to examine the effects of welfare reform on drug using and non-drug using welfare recipients. At the 2-year mark, 70% of the sample reported having ever filed an income tax return, of these 76% had received an EIC. Both hours worked and earnings were positively associated with EIC receipt. In this population, EIC appears to be a successful mechanism for improving economic self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

    This article examines the extent to which Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) recipients file income tax returns and take advantage of the Earned Income Credit (EIC), a program specifically designed to increase the economic self-sufficiency of lower income earners by supplementing earned and other income to make working more profitable. This study consisted primarily of Black and Hispanic women (n = 317), recruited for a longitudinal study designed to examine the effects of welfare reform on drug using and non-drug using welfare recipients. At the 2-year mark, 70% of the sample reported having ever filed an income tax return, of these 76% had received an EIC. Both hours worked and earnings were positively associated with EIC receipt. In this population, EIC appears to be a successful mechanism for improving economic self-sufficiency. (author abstract)