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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cunningham, Mary; Gearing, Maeve; Pergamit, Michael; Zhang, Simone; McDaniel, Marla; Howell, Brent
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Supportive Housing is an intervention that combines affordable housing with intensive wrap around services. The intervention has been successful with hard to serve populations, such as chronically homeless adults. Communities are testing the efficacy of supportive housing with high-need child welfare families to learn if providing supportive housing helps improve outcomes for children and families, spend taxpayer dollars more wisely, and lead to long-lasting systems change and service integration. The Partnership to Demonstrate the Effectiveness of Supportive Housing for Families in the Child Welfare System is a federal demonstration investigating these important questions. This brief describes the purpose and design of the demonstration and profiles the five program sites. (author abstract)

    Supportive Housing is an intervention that combines affordable housing with intensive wrap around services. The intervention has been successful with hard to serve populations, such as chronically homeless adults. Communities are testing the efficacy of supportive housing with high-need child welfare families to learn if providing supportive housing helps improve outcomes for children and families, spend taxpayer dollars more wisely, and lead to long-lasting systems change and service integration. The Partnership to Demonstrate the Effectiveness of Supportive Housing for Families in the Child Welfare System is a federal demonstration investigating these important questions. This brief describes the purpose and design of the demonstration and profiles the five program sites. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Khadduri, Jill; Leopold, Josh; Sokol, Brian; Spellman, Brooke
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    This study measures costs associated with first-time homeless families and individuals incurred by homeless and mainstream service delivery systems in six study communities. Unaccompanied individuals were studied in Des Moines, Iowa; Houston, Texas; and Jacksonville, Florida. Families were studied in Houston, Texas; Kalamazoo, Michigan; Upstate South Carolina; and Washington, DC.

    Past research has primarily documented costs associated with homelessness for individuals with chronic patterns of homelessness or severe mental illness. Newer work has been published on the costs incurred within the homeless system for families experiencing first-time homelessness. This study provides additional findings that help to improve our understanding of homelessness and its associated costs. It presents ideas about opportunities for cost savings, and it advances an approach for measuring costs that, coupled with other evaluation methods, can help communities understand the cost-effectiveness of different homelessness interventions. (author abstract) 

    This study measures costs associated with first-time homeless families and individuals incurred by homeless and mainstream service delivery systems in six study communities. Unaccompanied individuals were studied in Des Moines, Iowa; Houston, Texas; and Jacksonville, Florida. Families were studied in Houston, Texas; Kalamazoo, Michigan; Upstate South Carolina; and Washington, DC.

    Past research has primarily documented costs associated with homelessness for individuals with chronic patterns of homelessness or severe mental illness. Newer work has been published on the costs incurred within the homeless system for families experiencing first-time homelessness. This study provides additional findings that help to improve our understanding of homelessness and its associated costs. It presents ideas about opportunities for cost savings, and it advances an approach for measuring costs that, coupled with other evaluation methods, can help communities understand the cost-effectiveness of different homelessness interventions. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Dworsky, Amy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Studies indicate that many transitioning foster youth experience periods in which they are either homeless or precariously housed. Allowing young people to remain in foster care for up to 3 additional years (until age 21) could reduce homelessness by (a) providing housing to 18- to 20-year-old foster youth who might otherwise have been homeless, and (b) better preparing young people for the transition to adulthood. In this issue brief, the authors highlight data from a longitudinal study that examined homelessness among transitioning foster youth in one of the few states that allow youth to remain in foster care until their 21st birthday as well as those from two states where that is not an option. They found that nearly 30 percent of the study participants had been homeless for at least one night by age 23 or 24. Allowing young people to remain in care until their 21st birthday reduced the risk of becoming homeless prior to age 19 and, to a lesser extent, age 21. However, there was little protective effect beyond age 21. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for...

    Studies indicate that many transitioning foster youth experience periods in which they are either homeless or precariously housed. Allowing young people to remain in foster care for up to 3 additional years (until age 21) could reduce homelessness by (a) providing housing to 18- to 20-year-old foster youth who might otherwise have been homeless, and (b) better preparing young people for the transition to adulthood. In this issue brief, the authors highlight data from a longitudinal study that examined homelessness among transitioning foster youth in one of the few states that allow youth to remain in foster care until their 21st birthday as well as those from two states where that is not an option. They found that nearly 30 percent of the study participants had been homeless for at least one night by age 23 or 24. Allowing young people to remain in care until their 21st birthday reduced the risk of becoming homeless prior to age 19 and, to a lesser extent, age 21. However, there was little protective effect beyond age 21. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for policy and practice. (Author abstract)