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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Popham, Amelia ; Dwyer, Kathleen; Bradford, Janae; Eckrich Sommer, Teresa; Sabol, Terri
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for the current family unit, as well as future generations to come.  During this webinar, presenters took a closer look at whole family approaches through the lens of both a practitioner and a researcher with a special focus on CAP Tulsa, which provides a 2Generation healthcare training program called CareerAdvance.  Dr. Teresa Sommer, Dr. Terri Sabol, and Janae Bradford served as speakers while Amelia Popham moderated the discussion and Dr. Kathleen Dwyer served as the discussant.

    This...

    On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for the current family unit, as well as future generations to come.  During this webinar, presenters took a closer look at whole family approaches through the lens of both a practitioner and a researcher with a special focus on CAP Tulsa, which provides a 2Generation healthcare training program called CareerAdvance.  Dr. Teresa Sommer, Dr. Terri Sabol, and Janae Bradford served as speakers while Amelia Popham moderated the discussion and Dr. Kathleen Dwyer served as the discussant.

    This document is the transcript from Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  View additional Webinar materials.

     

  • Individual Author: Popham, Amelia ; Dwyer, Kathleen; Bradford, Janae; Eckrich Sommer, Teresa; Sabol, Terri
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for the current family unit, as well as future generations to come.  During this webinar, presenters took a closer look at whole family approaches through the lens of both a practitioner and a researcher with a special focus on CAP Tulsa, which provides a 2Generation healthcare training program called CareerAdvance.  Dr. Teresa Sommer, Dr. Terri Sabol, and Janae Bradford served as speakers while Amelia Popham moderated the discussion and Dr. Kathleen Dwyer served as the discussant.

    This...

    On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for the current family unit, as well as future generations to come.  During this webinar, presenters took a closer look at whole family approaches through the lens of both a practitioner and a researcher with a special focus on CAP Tulsa, which provides a 2Generation healthcare training program called CareerAdvance.  Dr. Teresa Sommer, Dr. Terri Sabol, and Janae Bradford served as speakers while Amelia Popham moderated the discussion and Dr. Kathleen Dwyer served as the discussant.

    This document is the Q&A document from Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  View additional Webinar materials.

     

  • Individual Author: Popham, Amelia; Dwyer, Kathleen; Bradford, Janae; Eckrich Sommer, Teresa; Sabol, Terri
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for the current family unit, as well as future generations to come.  During this webinar, presenters took a closer look at whole family approaches through the lens of both a practitioner and a researcher with a special focus on CAP Tulsa, which provides a 2Generation healthcare training program called CareerAdvance.  Dr. Teresa Sommer, Dr. Terri Sabol, and Janae Bradford served as speakers while Amelia Popham moderated the discussion and Dr. Kathleen Dwyer served as the discussant.

    This...

    On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for the current family unit, as well as future generations to come.  During this webinar, presenters took a closer look at whole family approaches through the lens of both a practitioner and a researcher with a special focus on CAP Tulsa, which provides a 2Generation healthcare training program called CareerAdvance.  Dr. Teresa Sommer, Dr. Terri Sabol, and Janae Bradford served as speakers while Amelia Popham moderated the discussion and Dr. Kathleen Dwyer served as the discussant.

    This document is the PowerPoint from Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  View additional Webinar materials.

     

  • Individual Author: Gall, Anamita; Wright, Nicole
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program funds demonstration projects that provide training and education to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) is evaluating the HPOG Program using a multipronged strategy to examine program implementation, systems change, and outcomes and impacts for participants.

    The HPOG University Partnership Research Grants (HPOGUP) are part of OPRE’s comprehensive HPOG evaluation strategy and fund studies conducted by university researchers partnering with one or more HPOG program to answer specific questions about how to improve HPOG services within local contexts. In 2016, OPRE awarded a second round of HPOGUP grants (HPOGUP 2.0) to the following universities:

    • Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP), conducting a study...

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program funds demonstration projects that provide training and education to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) is evaluating the HPOG Program using a multipronged strategy to examine program implementation, systems change, and outcomes and impacts for participants.

    The HPOG University Partnership Research Grants (HPOGUP) are part of OPRE’s comprehensive HPOG evaluation strategy and fund studies conducted by university researchers partnering with one or more HPOG program to answer specific questions about how to improve HPOG services within local contexts. In 2016, OPRE awarded a second round of HPOGUP grants (HPOGUP 2.0) to the following universities:

    • Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP), conducting a study titled, Study of Career Advancement and Quality Jobs in Health Care in partnership with the WorkPlace, Inc. in Bridgeport, Connecticut;
    • Loyola University of Chicago, conducting a study titled, Evaluation of Goal-Directed Psychological Capital and Employer Coaching in Health Profession Opportunity Development in partnership with Chicago State University in Chicago, Illinois;
    • Northwestern University, Institute for Policy Research, conducting a study titled, The Northwestern University Two-Generation Study (NU2Gen) of Parent and Child Human Capital Advancement in partnership with the Community Action Project of Tulsa County, (CAP Tulsa) in Oklahoma. (Author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Hendra, Richard ; Greenberg, David H.; Hamilton, Gayle; Oppenheim, Ari; Pennington, Alexandra; Schaberg, Kelsey; Tessler, Betsy L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report summarizes the two-year findings of a rigorous random assignment evaluation of the WorkAdvance model, a sectoral training and advancement initiative. Launched in 2011, WorkAdvance goes beyond the previous generation of employment programs by introducing demand-driven skills training and a focus on jobs that have career pathways. The model is heavily influenced by the positive findings from the Sectoral Employment Impact Study (SEIS) completed in 2010. A major component of the WorkAdvance model, in common with the programs studied in the SEIS, is formal training offering industry-recognized certifications, reflecting the hypothesis that skills acquisition is necessary for advancement. The model also requires providers to be far more employer-facing than traditional training programs, taking into account multiple employers’ changing skill requirements, employee assessment practices, and personnel needs. This report presents the implementation, cost, participation, and two-year economic impacts of WorkAdvance. The economic results are based on unemployment insurance...

    This report summarizes the two-year findings of a rigorous random assignment evaluation of the WorkAdvance model, a sectoral training and advancement initiative. Launched in 2011, WorkAdvance goes beyond the previous generation of employment programs by introducing demand-driven skills training and a focus on jobs that have career pathways. The model is heavily influenced by the positive findings from the Sectoral Employment Impact Study (SEIS) completed in 2010. A major component of the WorkAdvance model, in common with the programs studied in the SEIS, is formal training offering industry-recognized certifications, reflecting the hypothesis that skills acquisition is necessary for advancement. The model also requires providers to be far more employer-facing than traditional training programs, taking into account multiple employers’ changing skill requirements, employee assessment practices, and personnel needs. This report presents the implementation, cost, participation, and two-year economic impacts of WorkAdvance. The economic results are based on unemployment insurance earnings records and a second-year follow-up survey.

    The WorkAdvance program operations and evaluation are funded through the federal Social Innovation Fund (SIF), a public-private partnership administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service. This SIF project is led by the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and the NYC Center for Economic Opportunity in collaboration with MDRC.

    Key Findings

    • All providers translated the WorkAdvance model into a set of concrete services, but it took time — more than a year for some components and providers — and a substantial amount of technical assistance and support. As a result, at some sites, later study enrollees were more likely than earlier ones to experience a fully implemented and “mature” WorkAdvance program.
    • Overall, WorkAdvance resulted in very large increases in participation in every category of services, as well as in training completion and credential acquisition, compared with what would have happened in the absence of the program. Expenditures for the operation of WorkAdvance fell between $5,200 and $6,700 per participant at the four providers delivering the program.
    • WorkAdvance providers increased earnings, with variation in results that closely matched the providers’ experience in running sector-based programs and the extent to which the services they offered were demand driven. The most experienced sectoral provider, Per Scholas, had large and consistent impacts on both primary and secondary outcomes. Madison Strategies Group and Towards Employment, providers new to sectoral training, had promising but less consistent results that grew stronger for later enrollees. One provider, St. Nicks Alliance, did not produce positive impacts. The results did not differ dramatically across subgroups, though encouragingly, WorkAdvance was able to increase earnings among the long-term unemployed.

    The evaluation as a whole provides important information for workforce development providers interested in pursuing a sector strategy. The analysis considers the role played by providers’ sector-specific training and preparation and the role played by the nature of the sectors themselves. Future priorities that emerge from the results are (1) understanding how to help the more disadvantaged access the programs and (2) learning how to build service capacity, given how complex the model is to run. (Author abstract)

     

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