Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Schultz, Caroline; Elliot, Mark; McKernon, Signe-Mary; Lehman, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

  • Individual Author: Roman, Caterina G. ; Link, Nathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Former prisoners are increasingly facing the burden of financial debt associated with legal and criminal justice obligations in the U.S., yet little research has pursued how— theoretically or empirically—the burden of debt might affect key outcomes in prisoner reentry. To address the limited research, we examine the impact that having legal child support (CS) obligations has on employment and recidivism using data from the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI). In this report we describe the characteristics of adult male returning prisoners with child support orders and debt, and examine whether participation in SVORI was associated with greater services receipt than those in the comparison groups (for relevant services such as child-support services, employment preparation, and financial and legal assistance).

    We also examine the lagged impacts that child support obligations, legal employment and rearrest have on each other. Results from the crossed lagged panel model using GSEM in STATA indicate that while having child support debt...

    Former prisoners are increasingly facing the burden of financial debt associated with legal and criminal justice obligations in the U.S., yet little research has pursued how— theoretically or empirically—the burden of debt might affect key outcomes in prisoner reentry. To address the limited research, we examine the impact that having legal child support (CS) obligations has on employment and recidivism using data from the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI). In this report we describe the characteristics of adult male returning prisoners with child support orders and debt, and examine whether participation in SVORI was associated with greater services receipt than those in the comparison groups (for relevant services such as child-support services, employment preparation, and financial and legal assistance).

    We also examine the lagged impacts that child support obligations, legal employment and rearrest have on each other. Results from the crossed lagged panel model using GSEM in STATA indicate that while having child support debt does not appear to influence employment significantly, it does show a marginally significant protective effect—former prisoners who have child support obligations are less likely to be arrested after release from prison than those who do not have obligations. We discuss the findings within the framework of past and emerging theoretical work on desistance from crime. We also discuss the implications for prisoner reentry policy and practice. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sabol, Terri J. ; Sommer, Teresa E.; Chase-Lansdale, Linsday; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; King, Christopher T. ; Kathawalla, Ummul; Alamuddin, Rayane; Gomez, Celia J.; Ross, Emily C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Two-generation programs provide education and training services for parents while their children attend early childhood education programs. This study examines the rates of persistence and certification of parents in one of the only two-generation interventions in the country under study, CareerAdvance®, which offers training in the healthcare sector to parents while their children attend Head Start (n = 92). Results indicate that 16 months after enrolling in CareerAdvance®, 76% of participants attained at least one workforce-applicable certificate of the program and 59% were still in the program. The majority of parents who left the program during the 16 months had attained a certificate (68%). Parents with high levels of material hardship were more likely to attain a certificate and stay enrolled in the program, and parents with higher levels of psychological distress were less likely to attain a certificate in the same time period. Implications for future two-generation programming are discussed. (Author abstract)

    Two-generation programs provide education and training services for parents while their children attend early childhood education programs. This study examines the rates of persistence and certification of parents in one of the only two-generation interventions in the country under study, CareerAdvance®, which offers training in the healthcare sector to parents while their children attend Head Start (n = 92). Results indicate that 16 months after enrolling in CareerAdvance®, 76% of participants attained at least one workforce-applicable certificate of the program and 59% were still in the program. The majority of parents who left the program during the 16 months had attained a certificate (68%). Parents with high levels of material hardship were more likely to attain a certificate and stay enrolled in the program, and parents with higher levels of psychological distress were less likely to attain a certificate in the same time period. Implications for future two-generation programming are discussed. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Sabol, Terri J.; King, Christopher T.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Chor, Elise
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    CAP Tulsa is at the forefront of two-generation education programming and research for low-income parents and their children. This anti-poverty community action agency in Tulsa, Oklahoma has been highly successful to date in helping parents advance educationally and attain workforce-applicable certification in the healthcare field while their young children are engaged in CAP Tulsa’s high-quality early education programs. These achievements are particularly noteworthy when compared with the lower success rates of other postsecondary education and workforce development programs that often focus on low-income adults, not parents. We recommend that CAP Tulsa remain a leader in the two-generation field. 
     
    In this report, which represents the progress made during Year 4 of the CAP Family Life Study, we use study data to suggest that the CareerAdvance® program, in its current form, is both serving a population of CAP Tulsa parents who are largely well-suited for the program (i.e. economically disadvantaged and psychologically healthy) and offering a package of supportive...

    CAP Tulsa is at the forefront of two-generation education programming and research for low-income parents and their children. This anti-poverty community action agency in Tulsa, Oklahoma has been highly successful to date in helping parents advance educationally and attain workforce-applicable certification in the healthcare field while their young children are engaged in CAP Tulsa’s high-quality early education programs. These achievements are particularly noteworthy when compared with the lower success rates of other postsecondary education and workforce development programs that often focus on low-income adults, not parents. We recommend that CAP Tulsa remain a leader in the two-generation field. 
     
    In this report, which represents the progress made during Year 4 of the CAP Family Life Study, we use study data to suggest that the CareerAdvance® program, in its current form, is both serving a population of CAP Tulsa parents who are largely well-suited for the program (i.e. economically disadvantaged and psychologically healthy) and offering a package of supportive services that seem to be well-matched to their needs and interests. The data are also suggestive of potential avenues for cutting program expenses and further strengthening program offerings. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Aizer, Anna; Eli, Shari; Ferrie, Joseph P.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers. (author abstract)

    We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2005 to 2016

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations