Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: MDRC; Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project conducted randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions at two child care agencies in Indiana and Oklahoma. This brief provides an overview of the interventions the BIAS team designed in partnership with these sites, which targeted two primary problems:

    1. Many parents who receive Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) vouchers do not select a highly rated provider, even in states that have a standardized system for rating provider quality,.
    2. Some parents who are required to periodically document their continued eligibility for CCDF subsidies do not complete this process on time, which can lead to gaps in service, loss of funds for providers, and increased administrative burden for agencies.

    One-page site summaries in this brief detail the problem or problems of interest at each agency, the behavioral intervention(s) implemented to address each of those problems, and the findings from the tests of the interventions. (Author abstract) 

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project conducted randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions at two child care agencies in Indiana and Oklahoma. This brief provides an overview of the interventions the BIAS team designed in partnership with these sites, which targeted two primary problems:

    1. Many parents who receive Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) vouchers do not select a highly rated provider, even in states that have a standardized system for rating provider quality,.
    2. Some parents who are required to periodically document their continued eligibility for CCDF subsidies do not complete this process on time, which can lead to gaps in service, loss of funds for providers, and increased administrative burden for agencies.

    One-page site summaries in this brief detail the problem or problems of interest at each agency, the behavioral intervention(s) implemented to address each of those problems, and the findings from the tests of the interventions. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hussermann, Jeanette; Liberman, Akiva; Parks, Erika
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Delivering reentry services to youth proves challenging. This brief describes the implementation and sustainability of two Juvenile Second Chance Act reentry programs in Oklahoma and Virginia. Drawing from semi-structured interviews with grantees and community and state stakeholders conducted between 2013 and 2016, evaluators document the challenges to providing prerelease support and coordinating services among institutional and community supervision agencies and organizations. This brief is part of a larger evaluation of Juvenile Offender Reentry Demonstration Projects funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in fiscal year 2010. (Author abstract)

    Delivering reentry services to youth proves challenging. This brief describes the implementation and sustainability of two Juvenile Second Chance Act reentry programs in Oklahoma and Virginia. Drawing from semi-structured interviews with grantees and community and state stakeholders conducted between 2013 and 2016, evaluators document the challenges to providing prerelease support and coordinating services among institutional and community supervision agencies and organizations. This brief is part of a larger evaluation of Juvenile Offender Reentry Demonstration Projects funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in fiscal year 2010. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Adams, Gina; Derrick-Mills, Teresa; Heller, Caroline
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Child care can be an insurmountable barrier for low-income parents seeking education and training so they can get better jobs to support their families. Helping families with child care can also be challenging for programs trying to help these parents get ahead. Despite funding and policy barriers, there are programs that have taken on this challenge. This brief summarizes a longer study and lays out six steps that local and state programs can take to address the child care needs of parents in education and training. This is part of the Urban Institute’s series of reports from the Bridging the Gap project, which focuses on what we know about the child care needs of parents needing education and training. (Author abstract)

    Child care can be an insurmountable barrier for low-income parents seeking education and training so they can get better jobs to support their families. Helping families with child care can also be challenging for programs trying to help these parents get ahead. Despite funding and policy barriers, there are programs that have taken on this challenge. This brief summarizes a longer study and lays out six steps that local and state programs can take to address the child care needs of parents in education and training. This is part of the Urban Institute’s series of reports from the Bridging the Gap project, which focuses on what we know about the child care needs of parents needing education and training. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Alicia
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    An estimated 2.8 million Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither in school nor employed. In many big cities, up to one-fourth of all young adults can be characterized as “disconnected.” The problem is also severe in rural communities located in high-poverty areas, a pattern that is vividly illustrated by the disproportionate number of minority youth in the South who fall into this category.

    Mayors and city councilmembers are particularly well positioned to set the tone and direction for local efforts to reengage disconnected youth. By articulating key priorities and future directions for change, municipal leaders can provide a much-needed framework for discussions that involve the full range of city officials, community stakeholders, and local residents. (author abstract)

    An estimated 2.8 million Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither in school nor employed. In many big cities, up to one-fourth of all young adults can be characterized as “disconnected.” The problem is also severe in rural communities located in high-poverty areas, a pattern that is vividly illustrated by the disproportionate number of minority youth in the South who fall into this category.

    Mayors and city councilmembers are particularly well positioned to set the tone and direction for local efforts to reengage disconnected youth. By articulating key priorities and future directions for change, municipal leaders can provide a much-needed framework for discussions that involve the full range of city officials, community stakeholders, and local residents. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hendra, Rick
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference describes an implementation study of an employment retention and advancement program based in three cities.

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference describes an implementation study of an employment retention and advancement program based in three cities.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2002 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations