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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Fitzpatrick, Maria Donovan
    Reference Type: Report, Thesis
    Year: 2008

    Three states (Georgia, Oklahoma and Florida) recently introduced Universal Pre-Kindergarten (Universal Pre-K) programs offering free preschool to all age-eligible children, and policy makers in many other states are promoting similar policies. How do such policies affect the participation of children in preschool programs (or do they merely substitute for preschool offered by the market)? Does the implicit child care subsidy afforded by Universal Pre-K change maternal labor supply? The author presents a model that includes preferences for child quality and shows the directions of change in preschool enrollment and maternal labor supply in response to Universal Pre-K programs are theoretically ambiguous. Using restricted-access data from the US Census Bureau, together with year and birthday based eligibility cutoffs, the author employs a regression discontinuity framework to estimate the effects of Universal Pre-K availability. Universal Pre-K availability increases preschool enrollment by 12 to 15 percent, with the largest effect on children of women with less than a Bachelor's...

    Three states (Georgia, Oklahoma and Florida) recently introduced Universal Pre-Kindergarten (Universal Pre-K) programs offering free preschool to all age-eligible children, and policy makers in many other states are promoting similar policies. How do such policies affect the participation of children in preschool programs (or do they merely substitute for preschool offered by the market)? Does the implicit child care subsidy afforded by Universal Pre-K change maternal labor supply? The author presents a model that includes preferences for child quality and shows the directions of change in preschool enrollment and maternal labor supply in response to Universal Pre-K programs are theoretically ambiguous. Using restricted-access data from the US Census Bureau, together with year and birthday based eligibility cutoffs, the author employs a regression discontinuity framework to estimate the effects of Universal Pre-K availability. Universal Pre-K availability increases preschool enrollment by 12 to 15 percent, with the largest effect on children of women with less than a Bachelor's Degree. Universal Pre-K availability has little effect on the labor supply of most women. However, women residing in rural areas in Georgia increase their children’s preschool enrollment and their own employment by 22 and 20 percent, respectively, when Universal Pre-K is available. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Guilfoyle, Deborah Petterson
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2006

    Scope and method of study. This study examined the perceived social support found in two low-income communities in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The purpose of this study was to compare the populations of two non-profit centers to determine if they differed in the types of social support. Social Support was measured by the Social Support Inventory. The Social Support Inventory is a self reporting instrument that identifies the 11 sources of social support and the five kinds of social support perceived by individuals. The results of the data collection were used to determine whether the amount of services provided by neighborhood community centers influenced the perception of social support.

    Findings and conclusions. Fifty-seven participants from an urban, north side community participated along with 47 participants from a west side community in Tulsa, Oklahoma (N = 104). Analysis of variance was used to determine if there was a difference in the perceived sources and kinds of support between the two centers. The difference between the two centers was determined to be...

    Scope and method of study. This study examined the perceived social support found in two low-income communities in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The purpose of this study was to compare the populations of two non-profit centers to determine if they differed in the types of social support. Social Support was measured by the Social Support Inventory. The Social Support Inventory is a self reporting instrument that identifies the 11 sources of social support and the five kinds of social support perceived by individuals. The results of the data collection were used to determine whether the amount of services provided by neighborhood community centers influenced the perception of social support.

    Findings and conclusions. Fifty-seven participants from an urban, north side community participated along with 47 participants from a west side community in Tulsa, Oklahoma (N = 104). Analysis of variance was used to determine if there was a difference in the perceived sources and kinds of support between the two centers. The difference between the two centers was determined to be significant. Two-way Analysis of variance was used to determine if there was a relationship between the centers and the demographic variables of age, gender, employment status, number of children, ethnicity and level of education. Employment status was found to be significant among participants. The author concluded that the relationships that are formed when people are employed extend the social support that individuals have in their lives. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brocksen, Sally M.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2006

    This project employed a descriptive case study methodology guided by rational choice theory to examine the financial feasibility of marriage for low income women. By modeling the income and expenses of eight different low income family types in six states (Arizona, California, New York, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Wisconsin) this study illustrates the financial situation of various low income families. The family types under investigation include: a single parent family, a family receiving TANF, cohabiting couple with two wage earners, cohabiting couple with one wage earner, a married family with two wage earners, a married couple with one wage earner, a unmarried couple with an infant (unmarried fragile family), and a married couple with an infant (married fragile family). The income of each family type was calculated at two different wage levels (minimum and low wage for each state under investigation). Income included the welfare benefits and subsidies each of the family's is likely to receive (including child care subsidies and tax credits). The expenses of each family were...

    This project employed a descriptive case study methodology guided by rational choice theory to examine the financial feasibility of marriage for low income women. By modeling the income and expenses of eight different low income family types in six states (Arizona, California, New York, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Wisconsin) this study illustrates the financial situation of various low income families. The family types under investigation include: a single parent family, a family receiving TANF, cohabiting couple with two wage earners, cohabiting couple with one wage earner, a married family with two wage earners, a married couple with one wage earner, a unmarried couple with an infant (unmarried fragile family), and a married couple with an infant (married fragile family). The income of each family type was calculated at two different wage levels (minimum and low wage for each state under investigation). Income included the welfare benefits and subsidies each of the family's is likely to receive (including child care subsidies and tax credits). The expenses of each family were calculated based on the size of the family and the cost of expenses such as housing and food expenditures. This study found that of the models presented here married families are not always financially better off when compared to single parent and cohabiting families. These findings demonstrate that if policy makers wish to support marriage among low income families they should first make marriage financially feasible for unmarried couples (particularly cohabiting couples) and create greater economic stability for couples that are already married. By providing consistent work supports (e.g. child care and health insurance), expanding programs that help low income families (such as the Earned Income Tax Credit), creating poverty measures that accurately reflect the real situation of low income families, and increasing the wages of low income workers, policy makers will create an environment where it is financially feasible for low income couples to marry and remain married. (author abstract)

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