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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Shattuck, Rachel M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

  • Individual Author: Schultz, Caroline; Elliot, Mark; McKernon, Signe-Mary; Lehman, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

  • Individual Author: Edmiston, Kelly D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The worst recession in U.S. postwar history, starting in late 2007, confronted low- and moderate-income families and individuals with distinct challenges. To address the severe lack of data on the "LMI," population, the Kansas City Fed launched its LMI Survey in 2009.

    Distributed to more than 700 organizations that provide services to the LMI population, the Survey elicits a wealth of qualitative reporting. It also produces quantitative data, including several quarterly indexes that track changes in LMI financial conditions over time.

    Edmiston summarizes insights from the Survey on how the recession and anemic recovery have affected job availability for the LMI population, affordable housing, access to credit and demand for basic services. The findings are useful for policymakers seeking to promote financial success among the 30 million U.S. families classified as LMI. (author abstract)

    The worst recession in U.S. postwar history, starting in late 2007, confronted low- and moderate-income families and individuals with distinct challenges. To address the severe lack of data on the "LMI," population, the Kansas City Fed launched its LMI Survey in 2009.

    Distributed to more than 700 organizations that provide services to the LMI population, the Survey elicits a wealth of qualitative reporting. It also produces quantitative data, including several quarterly indexes that track changes in LMI financial conditions over time.

    Edmiston summarizes insights from the Survey on how the recession and anemic recovery have affected job availability for the LMI population, affordable housing, access to credit and demand for basic services. The findings are useful for policymakers seeking to promote financial success among the 30 million U.S. families classified as LMI. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Berman, Jacqueline; Coffee-Borden, Brandon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is...

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is based on INA grantees’ performance measure data and qualitative data collected during site visits to a purposive sample of five diverse grantees in five states.  This report also highlights key findings and innovations grantees made to better serve youth. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: First Nations Development Institute
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Predatory lending practices, which increased with the collapse of the subprime mortgage market, disproportionately target Native American communities and other vulnerable populations. This report provides an overview of the predatory lending practices that have had a harmful impact on Native people and highlights the efforts of five Native Nations to fight this growing problem. (Author abstract)

    Predatory lending practices, which increased with the collapse of the subprime mortgage market, disproportionately target Native American communities and other vulnerable populations. This report provides an overview of the predatory lending practices that have had a harmful impact on Native people and highlights the efforts of five Native Nations to fight this growing problem. (Author abstract)

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