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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Alemany, Xavier
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted 15 randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions across eight states, in the domains of work support, child support, and child care. BIAS used a systematic approach called “behavioral diagnosis and design” to develop the interventions and their associated materials. This process involved identifying problems that were appropriate for behavioral interventions, diagnosing the underlying behavioral reasons for each problem, designing interventions, and conducting rigorous tests to determine whether the interventions improved outcomes. The Behavioral Interventions Materials Compendium contains all of the written materials that the project designed and tested as part of those interventions. The compendium is arranged by program area domain, site/agency, and type of intervention. Each section begins with a one-page summary of the particular intervention that was implemented, followed by a list of the printed materials for that intervention and copies of the materials themselves. (Author...

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted 15 randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions across eight states, in the domains of work support, child support, and child care. BIAS used a systematic approach called “behavioral diagnosis and design” to develop the interventions and their associated materials. This process involved identifying problems that were appropriate for behavioral interventions, diagnosing the underlying behavioral reasons for each problem, designing interventions, and conducting rigorous tests to determine whether the interventions improved outcomes. The Behavioral Interventions Materials Compendium contains all of the written materials that the project designed and tested as part of those interventions. The compendium is arranged by program area domain, site/agency, and type of intervention. Each section begins with a one-page summary of the particular intervention that was implemented, followed by a list of the printed materials for that intervention and copies of the materials themselves. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zhu, Terri; Berman,David; Gasper, Joseph; Schaberg, Kelsey
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). More information on the longer-term impacts and return on investment (ROI) of workforce strategies can help inform policymakers who must make difficult decisions with constrained resources. This panel focused on how program performance data, coupled with longer term cost and impact findings, can inform and support policymakers making difficult decisions about workforce strategies and programs. Terri Zhu (Chicago Cook Workforce Partnership) moderated this session and served as a discussant. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). More information on the longer-term impacts and return on investment (ROI) of workforce strategies can help inform policymakers who must make difficult decisions with constrained resources. This panel focused on how program performance data, coupled with longer term cost and impact findings, can inform and support policymakers making difficult decisions about workforce strategies and programs. Terri Zhu (Chicago Cook Workforce Partnership) moderated this session and served as a discussant. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Knas, Emily; Stagner, Matthew; Bradley, M.C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

    YARH is built on the Federal Framework to End Youth Homelessness, which was published in 2013 by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH). The goals of the framework are to guide the development of data strategies that are intended to reveal the size and characteristics of the homeless youth population and to support the development of local capacity to prevent youth homelessness. The USICH framework targets the population of youth at risk of homelessness and suggests that the Preliminary Intervention Model be used to address this issue.

    The model focuses on four core outcomes: (1) housing, (2) permanent connections, (3) education and employment, and (4) social-emotional well-being. YARH is the first test of the framework...

    The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

    YARH is built on the Federal Framework to End Youth Homelessness, which was published in 2013 by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH). The goals of the framework are to guide the development of data strategies that are intended to reveal the size and characteristics of the homeless youth population and to support the development of local capacity to prevent youth homelessness. The USICH framework targets the population of youth at risk of homelessness and suggests that the Preliminary Intervention Model be used to address this issue.

    The model focuses on four core outcomes: (1) housing, (2) permanent connections, (3) education and employment, and (4) social-emotional well-being. YARH is the first test of the framework in practice. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Woolverton, Maria; Bradley, M.C.; Gabel, George; Melz, Heidi
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Landers, Patrick
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report represents the final synthesis of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project. Overall, the project’s findings demonstrated that applying behavioral insights to challenges facing human services programs can improve program efficiency, operations, and outcomes at a relatively low cost.

    The report discusses in detail:

    •overall findings from the project;

    •lessons learned during the knowledge development period as well as across the project’s sites;

    •the broader context in which the findings are situated, with respect to both applied behavioral insights and human services; and

    •implications for future research and practice.

    Each chapter is accompanied by at least one independent commentary by an expert in the field. (Author abstract)

    This report represents the final synthesis of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project. Overall, the project’s findings demonstrated that applying behavioral insights to challenges facing human services programs can improve program efficiency, operations, and outcomes at a relatively low cost.

    The report discusses in detail:

    •overall findings from the project;

    •lessons learned during the knowledge development period as well as across the project’s sites;

    •the broader context in which the findings are situated, with respect to both applied behavioral insights and human services; and

    •implications for future research and practice.

    Each chapter is accompanied by at least one independent commentary by an expert in the field. (Author abstract)

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