Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Person, Ann E. ; Clary, Elizabeth; Zief, Susan; Adamek, Katie; Caplan, Valerie; Worthington, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report is the first systematic description of the Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) grant program’s efforts to support expectant and parenting youth. It examines early grant implementation among the 17 states and Indian tribes awarded PAF grants in 2013. The study team gathered and analyzed data from two sources: (1) a standardized review of grant applications, and (2) telephone interviews with administrators representing the 17 grantees. Drawing upon systematic analysis of both data sources, this report describes how grantees developed their strategic approaches and the contextual factors that influenced their decisions. It examines how grantees’ design choices address the wide-ranging needs of expectant and parenting youth and how grantees’ administrative structures support program implementation. It also provides a set of profiles summarizing each grantee’s specific program approach. (Author abstract)

     

    This report is the first systematic description of the Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) grant program’s efforts to support expectant and parenting youth. It examines early grant implementation among the 17 states and Indian tribes awarded PAF grants in 2013. The study team gathered and analyzed data from two sources: (1) a standardized review of grant applications, and (2) telephone interviews with administrators representing the 17 grantees. Drawing upon systematic analysis of both data sources, this report describes how grantees developed their strategic approaches and the contextual factors that influenced their decisions. It examines how grantees’ design choices address the wide-ranging needs of expectant and parenting youth and how grantees’ administrative structures support program implementation. It also provides a set of profiles summarizing each grantee’s specific program approach. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Aizer, Anna; Eli, Shari; Ferrie, Joseph P.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers. (author abstract)

    We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: De Vita, Carol J.; Simms, Margaret; de Leon, Erwin; Fyffe, Saunji; Morley, Elaine; O'Brien, Carolyn T.; Rohacek, Monica; Scott, Molly M.; Ting, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), $1 billion was provided to the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) network to supplement existing CSBG funds to alleviate the causes and conditions of poverty in local areas and develop strong, healthy, and supportive communities. This report presents the findings of an extensive evaluation to document the services, promising practices, and challenges that emerged during the CSBG ARRA initiative. ARRA represented an unprecedented infusion of funding, accompanied by increased monitoring and accountability. The lessons learned have valuable implications for CSBG and the CSBG network. Fieldwork was conducted in California, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Washington. (author abstract)

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), $1 billion was provided to the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) network to supplement existing CSBG funds to alleviate the causes and conditions of poverty in local areas and develop strong, healthy, and supportive communities. This report presents the findings of an extensive evaluation to document the services, promising practices, and challenges that emerged during the CSBG ARRA initiative. ARRA represented an unprecedented infusion of funding, accompanied by increased monitoring and accountability. The lessons learned have valuable implications for CSBG and the CSBG network. Fieldwork was conducted in California, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Washington. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dickert-Conlin, Stacy; Fitzpatrick, Katie; Tiehen, Laura
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In 2004 the U.S. Department of Agriculture began a large-scale advertising campaign to increase participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by increasing awareness about the program. Despite this and other large-scale outreach efforts for federal programs targeted at eligible nonparticipants, the role of information in program participation is not well established. Paying careful attention to the potential endogeneity of advertising placement, we use variation over time and within states to estimate the effect of the advertising on caseloads, applications, approved applications, and denied applications. We find that radio advertisements are positively correlated with county-level caseloads in a sample that represents nearly every U.S. county. Six months after radio advertising in a county, the number of individuals receiving SNAP is 2 to 3 percent higher. With a smaller sample of counties on SNAP applications, approvals, and denials, we find limited evidence that SNAP is positively correlated with overall applications. However, approved applications are...

    In 2004 the U.S. Department of Agriculture began a large-scale advertising campaign to increase participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by increasing awareness about the program. Despite this and other large-scale outreach efforts for federal programs targeted at eligible nonparticipants, the role of information in program participation is not well established. Paying careful attention to the potential endogeneity of advertising placement, we use variation over time and within states to estimate the effect of the advertising on caseloads, applications, approved applications, and denied applications. We find that radio advertisements are positively correlated with county-level caseloads in a sample that represents nearly every U.S. county. Six months after radio advertising in a county, the number of individuals receiving SNAP is 2 to 3 percent higher. With a smaller sample of counties on SNAP applications, approvals, and denials, we find limited evidence that SNAP is positively correlated with overall applications. However, approved applications are not higher following radio advertisement exposure and denied applications increase. One way to reconcile the fact that caseloads are higher but new enrollments are not is that increased information from the advertising campaign may reduce exits from the program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rosenberg, Linda; Derr, Michelle; Pickens, Cassandra; Angus, Megan H.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), local areas throughout the country had the opportunity to offer subsidized summer employment to large numbers of youth in 2009 and 2010. In summer 2010, these initiatives relied largely on Recovery Act funds allocated to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Emergency Contingency Fund (TANF Emergency Fund). Capitalizing on the flexibility offered by the TANF Emergency Fund and building on their summer 2009 experiences using Recovery Act funds allocated to the Workforce Investment Act Youth program, state and local TANF and workforce agencies partnered to plan and administer summer youth employment initiatives in 2010.

    This study examines qualitative data collected in 10 local sites across seven states to describe the partnerships between state and local TANF and workforce agencies, particular aspects of the youth employment initiatives that the TANF funding affected, and youths' summer work experiences. (author abstract)

    *OPRE managed, but funded...

    Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), local areas throughout the country had the opportunity to offer subsidized summer employment to large numbers of youth in 2009 and 2010. In summer 2010, these initiatives relied largely on Recovery Act funds allocated to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Emergency Contingency Fund (TANF Emergency Fund). Capitalizing on the flexibility offered by the TANF Emergency Fund and building on their summer 2009 experiences using Recovery Act funds allocated to the Workforce Investment Act Youth program, state and local TANF and workforce agencies partnered to plan and administer summer youth employment initiatives in 2010.

    This study examines qualitative data collected in 10 local sites across seven states to describe the partnerships between state and local TANF and workforce agencies, particular aspects of the youth employment initiatives that the TANF funding affected, and youths' summer work experiences. (author abstract)

    *OPRE managed, but funded by DOL.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2002 to 2016

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations