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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gilbertson, Lauren; Phelps, Ellen; Morrison, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The presentation summarizes a study to examine which services child welfare agencies have trouble securing for children and families, how states use Title IV-B (of the Social Security Act) funds, and which other federal funding sources states also use for child welfare services.The presentation was based on the GAO's 2013 report titled Child Welfare: States Use Flexible Federal Funds, But Struggle to Meet Service Needs (GAO-13-170).

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation summarizes a study to examine which services child welfare agencies have trouble securing for children and families, how states use Title IV-B (of the Social Security Act) funds, and which other federal funding sources states also use for child welfare services.The presentation was based on the GAO's 2013 report titled Child Welfare: States Use Flexible Federal Funds, But Struggle to Meet Service Needs (GAO-13-170).

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory ; Vericker, Tracy; Lippold, Kye; Wheaton, Laura; Elkin, Sam; Koball, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    “Churning” in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is defined as when a household exits SNAP and then re-enters the program within 4 months. Churning is a policy concern due to the financial and administrative burden incurred by both SNAP households and State agencies that administer SNAP. This study explores the circumstances of churning in SNAP by determining the rates and patterns of churn, examining the causes of caseload churn, and calculating costs of churn to both participants and administering agencies in six States. (Author abstract)

    “Churning” in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is defined as when a household exits SNAP and then re-enters the program within 4 months. Churning is a policy concern due to the financial and administrative burden incurred by both SNAP households and State agencies that administer SNAP. This study explores the circumstances of churning in SNAP by determining the rates and patterns of churn, examining the causes of caseload churn, and calculating costs of churn to both participants and administering agencies in six States. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cunningham, Mary; Burt, Martha; Biess, Jennifer; Emam, Dina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This interim evaluation report describes the first year of the Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration (VHPD). Funded in FY2009, the VHPD is a joint effort of the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Veterans Affairs (VA), and Labor (DOL) to provide homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing to veterans, especially those returning from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The VHPD has five sites, with each associated with a military base and a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). The sites are in Utica, NY; Tampa Bay, FL; Tacoma, WA; San Diego, CA; and Austin, Texas. It is the first attempt to investigate homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services for veterans and their families.

    Prevention and rapid rehousing are necessary components in any plan to end homelessness. Veterans are at greater risk of homelessness than comparable non-veterans, with veterans of recent conflicts possibly at higher risk than veterans of earlier conflicts. Further, compared to earlier generations of veterans, service members returning from post-9/11...

    This interim evaluation report describes the first year of the Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration (VHPD). Funded in FY2009, the VHPD is a joint effort of the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Veterans Affairs (VA), and Labor (DOL) to provide homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing to veterans, especially those returning from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The VHPD has five sites, with each associated with a military base and a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). The sites are in Utica, NY; Tampa Bay, FL; Tacoma, WA; San Diego, CA; and Austin, Texas. It is the first attempt to investigate homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services for veterans and their families.

    Prevention and rapid rehousing are necessary components in any plan to end homelessness. Veterans are at greater risk of homelessness than comparable non-veterans, with veterans of recent conflicts possibly at higher risk than veterans of earlier conflicts. Further, compared to earlier generations of veterans, service members returning from post-9/11 conflicts include more women, parents, and members of the National Guard and Reserve units. Because of this, Congress intended that the VHPD evaluation investigate ways to reach and serve veterans at risk of homelessness among these subgroups. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Grin, Benjamin; Gayle, Tamara ; Saravia, Diana; Sanders, Lee
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Farmers market-based interventions, including the Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), represent a promising strategy for improving dietary behaviors in low-income communities. Little is known, however, about the health-related characteristics of low-income parents who frequent farmers markets in urban settings. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between family-health factors and the use of farmers markets by mothers of WIC recipients. We recruited a convenience sample of mothers of children seeking care at a primary care clinic in a large urban public hospital in Miami, Florida, in 2011 (n = 181 total). The clinic was adjacent to a newly established farmers market at the hospital. Each mother completed an interviewer-administered survey that included self-reported measures of maternal and child health, acculturation, dietary behaviors, food insecurity, and use of farmers markets.

    Reported use of farmers markets was independently associated with maternal history of...

    Farmers market-based interventions, including the Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), represent a promising strategy for improving dietary behaviors in low-income communities. Little is known, however, about the health-related characteristics of low-income parents who frequent farmers markets in urban settings. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between family-health factors and the use of farmers markets by mothers of WIC recipients. We recruited a convenience sample of mothers of children seeking care at a primary care clinic in a large urban public hospital in Miami, Florida, in 2011 (n = 181 total). The clinic was adjacent to a newly established farmers market at the hospital. Each mother completed an interviewer-administered survey that included self-reported measures of maternal and child health, acculturation, dietary behaviors, food insecurity, and use of farmers markets.

    Reported use of farmers markets was independently associated with maternal history of diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–38.3) and increased maternal vegetable (but not fruit) consumption (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.5–8.1). Intended future use of farmers markets was independently associated with being unemployed (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0–5.7), increased maternal vegetable consumption (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1–5.7), and food insecurity (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3–10.3). This study provides a snapshot of factors associated with farmers market use in a diverse population of urban low-income families. Understanding these factors may inform public health approaches to increase fresh fruit and vegetable consumption in communities at high risk for preventable chronic conditions. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Khadduri, Jill; Leopold, Josh; Sokol, Brian; Spellman, Brooke
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    This study measures costs associated with first-time homeless families and individuals incurred by homeless and mainstream service delivery systems in six study communities. Unaccompanied individuals were studied in Des Moines, Iowa; Houston, Texas; and Jacksonville, Florida. Families were studied in Houston, Texas; Kalamazoo, Michigan; Upstate South Carolina; and Washington, DC.

    Past research has primarily documented costs associated with homelessness for individuals with chronic patterns of homelessness or severe mental illness. Newer work has been published on the costs incurred within the homeless system for families experiencing first-time homelessness. This study provides additional findings that help to improve our understanding of homelessness and its associated costs. It presents ideas about opportunities for cost savings, and it advances an approach for measuring costs that, coupled with other evaluation methods, can help communities understand the cost-effectiveness of different homelessness interventions. (author abstract) 

    This study measures costs associated with first-time homeless families and individuals incurred by homeless and mainstream service delivery systems in six study communities. Unaccompanied individuals were studied in Des Moines, Iowa; Houston, Texas; and Jacksonville, Florida. Families were studied in Houston, Texas; Kalamazoo, Michigan; Upstate South Carolina; and Washington, DC.

    Past research has primarily documented costs associated with homelessness for individuals with chronic patterns of homelessness or severe mental illness. Newer work has been published on the costs incurred within the homeless system for families experiencing first-time homelessness. This study provides additional findings that help to improve our understanding of homelessness and its associated costs. It presents ideas about opportunities for cost savings, and it advances an approach for measuring costs that, coupled with other evaluation methods, can help communities understand the cost-effectiveness of different homelessness interventions. (author abstract) 

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